VMware Hands-on Labs - HOL-2193-01-ISM


Lab Overview - HOL-2193-01-ISM - VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery

VMware Tech Preview - Disclaimer


This Hands-on Labs may contain product features that are currently under development.

The overview of the new technology represents no commitment from VMware to deliver these features in any generally available product.

Features are subject to change, and must not be included in contracts, purchase orders, or sales agreements of any kind.

Technical feasibility and market demand will affect the final delivery.

Pricing and packaging for any new technologies or features discussed or presented have not been determined.

  • “These features are representative of feature areas under development. Feature commitments are subject to change, and must not be included in contracts, purchase orders, or sales agreements of any kind. Technical feasibility and market demand will affect the final delivery.”

Lab Guidance


Hands-on Labs allows you to evaluate the features and functionality of VMware products with no installation required. This lab is self-paced, and most modules are independent of each other. You can use the Table of Contents located in the upper right-hand corner to access any module.

If you are new to the VMware Learning Platform (VLP), please read the New User Guide located in the appendix. Click below to go directly to the new user console walkthrough before continuing:

This lab, HOL-2193-01-ISM - VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery, will guide you through the most common operation procedures of the VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery service, including the steps of registering an on-premises vSphere environment, enabling protection policies for workloads, creating and testing Disaster Recovery plans then executing a failover plan recovering workloads into VMware Cloud on AWS.

Lab Module List:

Lab Captains:

  • Simon Long, Solutions Architect, US

This lab manual can be downloaded from the Hands-on Labs Document site found here:

http://docs.hol.vmware.com

This lab may be available in other languages. To set your language preference and have a localized manual deployed with your lab, you may utilize this document to help guide you through the process:

http://docs.hol.vmware.com/announcements/nee-default-language.pdf


Module 1 - Creating a Protected Site

Environment Overview


 

The Hands-on Lab environment consists of the following on-premises components: 

  • vCenter 
  • 2x ESXi Hosts
  • Shared storage
  • Local storage
  • Win10-Desktop VM
  • Worker1 VM

The on-premises components are pre-configured into a vSphere cluster where our virtual machines are hosted. 

 And the following cloud services:

  • SaaS Orchestrator (Formerly ControlShift)
  • Scale-Out File System (Formerly Cloud DVX)
  • VMware Cloud on AWS SDDC (Software Defined Datacenter)

SaaS Orchestrator, the Scale-Out File System which are both cloud services and the VMware Cloud on AWS SDDC are already deployed and ready to be configured.


Introduction


This Module contains the following lessons:

  • Lesson 1: Creating a Protected Site - In this lesson, you will be creating a protect site which will be used to protect the on-premises virtual machines.

Hands-on Labs Interactive Simulation: Creating a Protected Site


This part of the lab is presented as a Hands-on Labs Interactive Simulation. This will allow you to experience steps which are too time-consuming or resource intensive to do live in the lab environment. In this simulation, you can use the software interface as if you are interacting with a live environment.

  1. Click here to open the interactive simulation. It will open in a new browser window or tab.
  2. When finished, click the “Return to the lab” link to continue with this lab.

Conclusion


In this lesson, you were able to create a protected site that will be used to protect on-premises vSphere workloads.

To recap, creating a protect site is completed in three simple steps.

  1. Create the protected site
  2. Download, deploy and configure the Connector appliance
  3. Register vCenter

 

You have finished Module 1

Congratulations on completing Module 1.

Module 2, walks you through the process of creating protection groups. A protection group is a policy that is created to identify which virtual machines should be protected and how regularly.

 

Module 2 - Creating a Protection Group

Introduction


This Module contains the following lessons:

  • Lesson 2: Creating a Protection Group - In this lesson, you will be creating a protection group which will be used to select which of our on-premises virtual machines will be protected by VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery

 

Protection Groups

A protection group is a policy that is created to identify which virtual machines should be protected and how regularly. Multiple protection groups can be created, which enables the granularity of backing up workloads more or less regularly than others.

In many cases, a protection group consists of multiple virtual machines that support a service such as an accounting system. For example, a service might consist of a database server, two application servers, and two web servers. In most cases, it is not be beneficial to fail over part of a service (only one or two of the servers in the example). All five servers would be included in a protection group to enable failover of the service.

Creating a protection group for each application or service also has the benefit of selective testing. With VCDR, having a protection group for each application enables non-disruptive, low-risk testing of individual applications. Application owners can test disaster recovery plans, as needed.

There are other organizational methods to consider when creating protection groups. One is creating a protection group for each business unit - all virtual machines belonging to a specific business unit are placed in a protection group. Another method is grouping virtual machines together by application tier. For example, all database servers in one protection group, all middleware servers in a second protection group, and all client-facing servers in a third protection group. While these approaches have their limitations, they also reduce the number of protection groups to create and manage.

 

 

Example Protection Group configurations

When creating protection groups, VM name patterns are used to dynamically select which virtual machines are protected by the protection group. Below are some example of how VM naming patterns can be used to protect various workloads.

Protection Group Name
VM name pattern
Description
SQL Databases
*SQL*
All SQL Databases
Web App 1
WEB-1*,APP-1*,SQL-1*
All components required for Web App 1
Test/Dev servers
TEST*,DEV*
All Test and Development servers
All Production servers
*, !TEST*, !DEV*
All servers excluding Test and Development servers

 

Hands-on Labs Interactive Simulation: Creating a Protection Group


This part of the lab is presented as a Hands-on Labs Interactive Simulation. This will allow you to experience steps which are too time-consuming or resource intensive to do live in the lab environment. In this simulation, you can use the software interface as if you are interacting with a live environment.

  1. Click here to open the interactive simulation. It will open in a new browser window or tab.
  2. When finished, click the “Return to the lab” link to continue with this lab.

The lab continues to run in the background. If the lab goes into standby mode, you can resume it after completing the module.


Conclusion


In this lesson, you were able to create a simple protection group that will protect specified workloads.

To recap on some of the key points;

  • A protection group is a policy that is created to identify which virtual machines should be protected and how regularly
  • Multiple protection groups can be created
  • When creating protection groups, VM name patterns are used to dynamically select which virtual machines are protected by the protection group
  • Multiple schedules can be created within each protection group

 


 

You have finished Module 2

Congratulations on completing Module 2.

Module 3, walks you through the process of creating a Disaster Recovery (DR) plan. A Disaster Recovery (DR) defines the orchestration configuration for disaster recovery and workload mobility.

 

Module 3 - Creating a Disaster Recovery Plan

Introduction


This Module contains the following lessons:

  • Lesson 3: Creating a Disaster Recovery (DR) plan - In this lesson, you will be creating a DR plan which will be used to failover our protected workloads into VMware Cloud on AWS.

 

Disaster Recovery Plans

A Disaster Recovery (DR) plan defines the orchestration configuration for disaster recovery and workload mobility.

Each plan includes a set of recovery steps that capture ordering constraints and action sequencing instructions for DR operations. These are the ordered instructions that will occur when the plan is executed.

Plans need to define where protected resources move to on the recovery site: protection groups, virtual machines, files, vCenter(s), all vCenter folders, compute resources, virtual networks, and IP addresses (individual or ranges).

 

 

Hands-on Labs Interactive Simulation: Creating a Disaster Recovery Plan


This part of the lab is presented as a Hands-on Labs Interactive Simulation. This will allow you to experience steps which are too time-consuming or resource intensive to do live in the lab environment. In this simulation, you can use the software interface as if you are interacting with a live environment.

  1. Click here to open the interactive simulation. It will open in a new browser window or tab.
  2. When finished, click the “Return to the lab” link to continue with this lab.

The lab continues to run in the background. If the lab goes into standby mode, you can resume it after completing the module.


Conclusion


In this lesson, you were able to create a simple Disaster Recovery (DR) plan.

To recap on some of the key points;

  • A Disaster Recovery (DR) plan defines the orchestration configuration for disaster recovery and workload mobility.
  • Each plan includes a set of recovery steps that capture ordering constraints and action sequencing instructions for DR operations. These are the ordered instructions that will occur when the plan is executed.
  • Plans need to define where protected resources move to on the recovery site: protection groups, virtual machines, files, vCenter(s), all vCenter folders, compute resources, virtual networks, and IP addresses (individual or ranges).

 

You have finished Module 3

Congratulations on completing Module 3.

Module 4, walks you through testing your newly created Disaster Recovery (DR) plan.

 

Module 4 - Testing a DR Plan

Introduction


This Module contains the following lessons:

  • Lesson 4: Testing a Disaster Recovery (DR) plan - In this lesson, you will be testing our DR plan which will be used to failover our protected workloads into VMware Cloud on AWS.

 

Testing DR Plans

DR plans should be tested on a regular basis, so you can determine if your plan works as you intended, and make sure that all IP address mappings work correctly on the virtual machine guest OS, all your vCenter folders and settings can be recovered on the target, all scripts execute correctly and in the proper order, and so on. Test failovers can also be used with periodic compliance reports to satisfy your company’s DR preparedness auditing policy.

Since test failovers are intended for debugging problems you might encounter during a real failover, you should evaluate each failure and make sure you understand what caused each one. Once the issue is resolved, you can continue the test failover.

 

 

 

Hands-on Labs Interactive Simulation: Testing a DR Plan


This part of the lab is presented as a Hands-on Labs Interactive Simulation. This will allow you to experience steps which are too time-consuming or resource intensive to do live in the lab environment. In this simulation, you can use the software interface as if you are interacting with a live environment.

  1. Click here to open the interactive simulation. It will open in a new browser window or tab.
  2. When finished, click the “Return to the lab” link to continue with this lab.

The lab continues to run in the background. If the lab goes into standby mode, you can resume it after completing the module.


Conclusion


In this lesson, you were able to test our newly created Disaster Recovery (DR) plan.

To recap on some of the key points;

  • DR plans should be tested on a regular basis
  • Test failovers can also be used with periodic compliance reports to satisfy your companys DR preparedness auditing policy.

 

You have finished Module 4

Congratulations on completing Module 4.

Module 5, walks you through executing the failover, recovering your critical workloads into VMware Cloud on AWS.

 

Module 5 - Executing a Failover

Introduction


This Module contains the following lessons:

  • Lesson 5: Executing a Failover - In this lesson, you will execute our DR plan which will automatically failover our protected workloads into VMware Cloud on AWS.

 

Executing A Failover

Executing a DR plan is as simple as testing a DR plan.  When you execute a plan as a failover, a running instance of the plan recovery steps are launched and the plan continues until completion or until a pause for user input or upon encountering an error if so configured.

The failover process can be monitored in the SaaS Orchestrator as well as the SDDC vCenter. After Failover, once the virtual machines have been powered on they will be Storage vMotioned onto the SDDC vSAN datastore.

 

 

 

Hands-on Labs Interactive Simulation: Executing a Failover


This part of the lab is presented as a Hands-on Labs Interactive Simulation. This will allow you to experience steps which are too time-consuming or resource intensive to do live in the lab environment. In this simulation, you can use the software interface as if you are interacting with a live environment.

  1. Click here to open the interactive simulation. It will open in a new browser window or tab.
  2. When finished, click the “Return to the lab” link to continue with this lab.

The lab continues to run in the background. If the lab goes into standby mode, you can resume it after completing the module.


Conclusion


In this lesson, you were able to successfully execute a failover which automatically recovered our protected workloads into VMware Cloud on AWS.

To recap on some of the key points;

  • Executing a DR plan is as simple as testing a DR plan
  • The failover process can be monitored in the SaaS Orchestrator as well as the SDDC vCenter
  • After Failover, once the virtual machines have been powered on they will be Storage vMotioned onto the SDDC vSAN datastore
  • An execution report can be generated after a failover or test failover has completed (and has been committed or acknowledged)

 

You have finished Module 5

Congratulations on completing Module 5.

 

Appendix - New User Guide

Appendix - New User Guide


The New User Guidance covers the following topics as part of the console walkthrough:

  • Location of the main console  
  • Alternative methods of keyboard data entry  
  • Activation prompt or watermark

 

Location of the Main Console

 

  1. The area in the RED box contains the Main Console.  The Lab Manual is on the tab to the Right of the Main Console.
  2. A particular lab may have additional consoles found on separate tabs in the upper left. You will be directed to open another specific console if needed.
  3. Your lab starts with 90 minutes on the timer.  The lab can not be saved.  All your work must be done during the lab session.  But you can click the EXTEND to increase your time.  If you are at a VMware event, you can extend your lab time twice, for up to 30 minutes.  Each click gives you an additional 15 minutes.  Outside of VMware events, you can extend your lab time up to 9 hours and 30 minutes. Each click gives you an additional hour.

 

 

Alternate Methods of Keyboard Data Entry

During this module, you will input text into the Main Console. Besides directly typing it in, there are two very helpful methods of entering data which make it easier to enter complex data.

 

 

Click and Drag Lab Manual Content Into Console Active Window

You can also click and drag text and Command Line Interface (CLI) commands directly from the Lab Manual into the active window in the Main Console.  

 

 

Accessing the Online International Keyboard

 

You can also use the Online International Keyboard found in the Main Console.

  1. Click on the Keyboard Icon found on the Windows Quick Launch Task Bar.

 

 

Activation Prompt or Watermark

 

When you first start your lab, you may notice a watermark on the desktop indicating that Windows is not activated.  

One of the major benefits of virtualization is that virtual machines can be moved and run on any platform.  The Hands-on Labs utilizes this benefit and we are able to run the labs out of multiple datacenters.  However, these datacenters may not have identical processors, which triggers a Microsoft activation check through the Internet.

Rest assured, VMware and the Hands-on Labs are in full compliance with Microsoft licensing requirements.  The lab that you are using is a self-contained pod and does not have full access to the Internet, which is required for Windows to verify the activation.  Without full access to the Internet, this automated process fails and you see this watermark.

This cosmetic issue has no effect on your lab.  

 

 

Look at the lower right portion of the screen

 

Please check to see that your lab has finished all the startup routines and is ready for you to start. If you see anything other than "Ready", please wait a few minutes.  If after 5 minutes your lab has not changed to "Ready", please ask for assistance.

CLICK HERE TO RETURN TO THE LAB GUIDANCE

 

Conclusion

Thank you for participating in the VMware Hands-on Labs. Be sure to visit http://hol.vmware.com/ to continue your lab experience online.

Lab SKU: HOL-2193-01-ISM

Version: 20201013-161841