VMware Hands-on Labs - HOL-2001-01-CMP


Lab Overview - HOL-2001-01-CMP - What's New in vROps 7.5

Lab Guidance


Note: It will take more than 90 minutes to complete this lab. You should expect to only finish 2-3 of the modules during your time.  The modules are independent of each other so you can start at the beginning of any module and proceed from there. You can use the Table of Contents to access any module of your choosing.

The Table of Contents can be accessed in the upper right-hand corner of the Lab Manual.

Lab Abstract:  In this lab, we will be reviewing the enhancements that have been made to (vROPs) vRealize Operations 7.5 as well as the new features. We will start off with a very brief overview of "What's new in vRealize Operations 7.5" in Module 1, then get into more details on the individual enhancements and new features in the remainder of the modules of the lab.

Lab Module List:

 Lab Captains:

  • Module 1-7 - Tim Sandy, Solutions Engineer, USA

 

This lab manual can be downloaded from the Hands-on Labs Document site found here:

http://docs.hol.vmware.com

This lab may be available in other languages.  To set your language preference and have a localized manual deployed with your lab, you may utilize this document to help guide you through the process:

http://docs.hol.vmware.com/announcements/nee-default-language.pdf


 

Location of the Main Console

 

  1. The area in the RED box contains the Main Console.  The Lab Manual is on the tab to the Right of the Main Console.
  2. A particular lab may have additional consoles found on separate tabs in the upper left. You will be directed to open another specific console if needed.
  3. Your lab starts with 90 minutes on the timer.  The lab can not be saved.  All your work must be done during the lab session.  But you can click the EXTEND to increase your time.  If you are at a VMware event, you can extend your lab time twice, for up to 30 minutes.  Each click gives you an additional 15 minutes.  Outside of VMware events, you can extend your lab time up to 9 hours and 30 minutes. Each click gives you an additional hour.

 

 

Alternate Methods of Keyboard Data Entry

During this module, you will input text into the Main Console. Besides directly typing it in, there are two very helpful methods of entering data which make it easier to enter complex data.

 

 

Click and Drag Lab Manual Content Into Console Active Window

You can also click and drag text and Command Line Interface (CLI) commands directly from the Lab Manual into the active window in the Main Console.  

 

 

Accessing the Online International Keyboard

 

You can also use the Online International Keyboard found in the Main Console.

  1. Click on the Keyboard Icon found on the Windows Quick Launch Task Bar.

 

 

Activation Prompt or Watermark

 

When you first start your lab, you may notice a watermark on the desktop indicating that Windows is not activated.  

One of the major benefits of virtualization is that virtual machines can be moved and run on any platform.  The Hands-on Labs utilizes this benefit and we are able to run the labs out of multiple datacenters.  However, these datacenters may not have identical processors, which triggers a Microsoft activation check through the Internet.

Rest assured, VMware and the Hands-on Labs are in full compliance with Microsoft licensing requirements.  The lab that you are using is a self-contained pod and does not have full access to the Internet, which is required for Windows to verify the activation.  Without full access to the Internet, this automated process fails and you see this watermark.

This cosmetic issue has no effect on your lab.  

 

 

Look at the lower right portion of the screen

 

Please check to see that your lab is finished all the startup routines and is ready for you to start. If you see anything other than "Ready", please wait a few minutes.  If after 5 minutes your lab has not changed to "Ready", please ask for assistance.

 

Module 1 - A Quick Overview of What's New in vRealize Operations 7.5 (15 minutes)

Introduction


In this module, we will very quickly walk through the user interface of vRealize Operations 7.5 and mention what is new with this version. This module is just meant to briefly cover the topics without going into any detail for those that are already familiar with vRealize Operations and work with it regularly, However everything covered in this module, will be covered in detail in the remainder of the other modules within this lab.

This lab module a brief overview of the following topics:

  • Allocation Planning
  • Application Monitoring
  • Enhanced Capacity Tab
  • Reclamation of Orphaned VMDKs
  • New Planning Scenarios
  • Set Cost Drivers
  • Set Dashboard Times
  • ServiceNow Integration
  • New Super Metric Editor
  • Custom Compliance Rules and Templates  

Log in to the vRealize Operations Live Instance


This lab environment is running two different instances of vRealize Operations and one instance of vRealize Log Insight. We have the different vRealize Operations instances in order to be able to work through different use cases that have unique requirements. The lab instances are as follows:

  • Live Instance: Connected to the small running vSphere environment in the lab. There isn't a large inventory of objects in this instance but it allows us to interact with vCenter Server.
  • Historical View Mode (HVM) Instance: Running a time loop of data that was captured in the past. This instance has a much larger inventory of objects but since it is not currently connected to a vCenter Server, we cannot perform any actions here.

In this lesson we will be using the live Instance of vRealize Operations.

If you are already logged into the live (not historical) instance of vRealize Operations, click here to skip ahead.


 

Open the Chrome Browser from Windows Quick Launch Task Bar

 

If your browser isn't already open, launch Google Chrome

  1. Click the Chrome icon on the Windows Quick Launch Task Bar

 

 

Open the vRealize Operations - Live Instance Tab

 

The browser home page has links to the different instances of vRealize Operations that are running in the lab.

  1. Click the vRealize Operations - Live Instance link to open the vRealize Operations UI in a new browser tab

 

 

Log in to vRealize Operations

 

vRealize Operations is integrated with VMware Identity Manager which we will use for user authentication in this lab.

VMware Identity Manager should be pre-selected as the identity source. However, if it is not you will choose it.

  1. Click the drop-down arrow
  2. Select VMware Identity Manager
  3. Click REDIRECT to take you to the authentication page

 

 

 

VMware Identity Manager Login

 

For this vRealize Operations instance, the lab uses VMware Identity Manager as the authentication provider. This allows for seamless integration with vRealize Log Insight.

The user and password information should already be filled in. However, if needed type them in.

username: holuser

password: VMware1!

  1. Click Sign in

 

Allocation Planning


In this lesson, we will look at the ability to change the policy settings to work from the default "Demand" policy to the "Allocation" model in vRealize Operations 7.5. In versions 6.x and prior, the default policy was based off of allocation. In vRealize Operations 7.0, we switched to only having the demand model and allocation was removed. However, numerous customers voiced that they wanted the allocation model back. So in vRealize Operations 7.5, we added it back as an option. However, you have to enable it by editing the default policy or adding a new one and setting it as the default policy. This lesson will walk us through how to create a new allocation policy.

Allocation model defines how much CPU, memory, or disk space is allocated to objects in a cluster or datastore cluster. In the policy, you can turn on the Allocation Model element and configure the resource allocation for the objects.

How the Allocation Model Element Works

The Allocation Model element determines how vRealize Operations Manager calculates capacity when you allocate a specific amount of CPU, memory, and disk space resource to clusters or data store clusters. You can specify the allocation ratio for either one, or all of the resource containers of the cluster. Unlike the demand model, the allocation model is used for capacity calculations only when you turn it on in the policy.

The allocation model element also affects the reclaimable resources for memory and storage in Reclaim page. When you turn on the Allocation Model element in the policy, the tabular representation of the VMs and snapshots in the selected data center from which resources can be reclaimed displays reclaimable memory and disk space based on the overcommit values.


 

User Interface: Menu

 

As we see, the Menu hasn't changed much in version 7.5. We still have the following tabs:

  • Home
  • Dashboards
  • Alerts
  • Environment
  • Administration

 

 

User Interface: Menu (continued)

 

We also have the following options on the far right side of the menu:

  • Global Search
  • Refresh
  • Notifications
  • User: Profile, Preferences, Help, About, and Log Out

 

 

User Interface:  Navigation Pane

 

The Navigation Pane is on the left-hand side of the user interface and has the following main options that we can select from under the Home tab in the menu bar:

  • Quick Start Dashboard (default)
  • Operations Overview
  • Optimize Performance
  • Optimize Capacity
  • Troubleshoot
  • Monitor Applications (NEW!)

 

 

User Interface:  Quick Start

 

By default, when you log into vRealize Operations 7.5, it will open to the Quick Start dashboard located under the Home tab of the menu bar. There are (4) main boxes/sections in this dashboard:

  • Optimize Performance
  • Optimize Capacity
  • Troubleshoot
  • Manage Configuration

NOTE:  In this lab, we may get to certain areas of the interface through different methods. There is typically more than one way to get to the same page within the interface.

 

 

Administration Tab

 

In order to change from the default Demand Model to the Allocation Model, we need to go to the Administration section of the interface.

  1. Click on the Administration tab in the menu bar at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Policies

 

Now we will need to go into the Policies section to change the default model.

  1. Click on Policies in the Navigation Pane on the left-hand side of the user interface.

 

 

Policy Library

 

  1. Click on the Policy Library tab at the top of the content pane for the policies section.
  2. Next, click on the Hands On Lab Policy from under Base Settings.
  3. Then click on the Edit Selected Policy (pencil) icon.

 

 

Analysis Settings

 

  1. Click on the All object types link under 3. Analysis Settings.

 

 

Allocation Model

 

  1. Drag the scroll bar down a little until we can see all of the Allocation Model section.
  2. Here we see the Allocation Model section. If we were wanting to enable the Allocation Model, we would unlock it and then set the appropriate settings. If it was a new policy, we would also have to then set the new policy as the default policy.

 

 

Cancel

 

  1. Click on the CANCEL button so we don't save any unwanted changes to the policy.

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on Allocation Planning!

In this lesson, we learned that the default policy was based on Demand and not Allocation. We also learned that we can enable the Allocation model so we are able to see data based on both Demand and Allocation.

If interested in learning more about Allocation Planning, see the Module #3 - Allocation-Based Planning lesson.

Up next is the lesson which covers Application Monitoring.

 

Application Monitoring


In this lesson, we will learn about the newly added feature Application Monitoring!

One of the most significant NEW features that vRealize Operations 7.5 will bring into play is native application and OS monitoring! That’s right – vRealize Operations 7.5 will provide full visibility from apps-to-infrastructure. This is a HUGE new set of capabilities that have gone into the product to give complete observability into your entire environment and troubleshoot performance issues even faster and more seamlessly than ever before. vRealize Operations 7.5 will automatically discover supported services running in your environment and allow you to choose whether you want vRealize Operations to monitor those applications directly, or just pull those metrics straight into Wavefront by VMware. Both Wavefront and vRealize Operations are now using Telegraf agents for metric collection and reporting.

If you use or have ever used Endpoint Operations, you know the visibility into the health and availability of the applications running in your SDDC is invaluable. So what if we are using Endpoint Operations today? If we already are using it, we can still try out the new Application Monitoring capability without disruption to our current monitoring with Endpoint Operations. They can both be used together in the same vRealize Operations 7.5 cluster (just not on the same virtual machine)So be sure not to have the old Endpoint Operations agent AND the new Telegraf agent on the same virtual machine, they cannot be together on a single virtual machine!

An additional great benefit of the new application monitoring is that it also offers full lifecycle management of agents. This includes the deployment, upgrade, configuration and even uninstall of the agent. Never with vRealize Operations has it been easier to get started with application monitoring than with vRealize Operations 7.5.


 

Menu - Home

 

If we are not already on the Home tab in the menu bar, do the following step, otherwise we can skip this step.

  1. Click on the Home tab in the menu bar at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Monitor Applications

 

  1. Click on Monitor Applications in the Navigation Pane on the left side of the user interface.

 

 

Supported Operating Systems and Services

 

In vRealize Operations 7.5, Application Monitoring will provide support for Windows and Linux virtual machines, and (17) popular packaged applications. Additionally, remote monitoring is available for HTTP, ICMP, TCP and UDP. Here we can review the full list of supported operating systems and services that can be monitored. Feel free to scroll down to the bottom of the page to see the full list.

 

 

Installation Process Overview

 

Here we have an overview of the entire installation process from start to finish to manage agents. First, we select the destination of either vRealize Operations or Wavefront. Next, we deploy the (ARC) Application Remote Collector which is a virtual appliance that can support up to (6500) virtual machines (in the “Large” deployment configuration). After deployment, simply register the ARC with vRealize Operations and select the vCenter servers hosting virtual machines with applications that we would like to monitor. At that point, we are ready to start deploying the Telegraf agent to the virtual machines. Once the Telegraf agent is deployed, a service discovery runs to find any of the supported applications running on the virtual machines. We can then select the applications we wish to monitor and provide some configuration details to make it easier to identify applications at a later time.

 

 

Administration

 

  1. Click on the Administration tab of the menu bar at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Inventory

 

  1. Click on Inventory in the Navigation Pane on the left side of the user interface.

 

 

Manage Agents

 

  1. Click on the Manage Agents tab in the Content Pane on the right side of the user interface.

We now see the list of virtual machines in our environment. We also see if the Telegraf agent is installed on the virtual machine, was the install successful, the discovered service that is on it, etc.

Under the Manage Agents tab, we have the ability to do full lifecycle management of the Telegraf agent on the virtual machines. This includes install, uninstall, update, start, stop and do remote checks. This makes managing the agent very easy across our entire environment.

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on Agent Installation and Management for vROPs or Wavefront!

In this lesson, we learned about the addition of native Application Monitoring in vRealize Operations 7.5. We also learned that it uses the Telegraf agent which is also used in our Wavefront solution.

If interested in learning more details about Application Monitoring, see the Module #4 - Agent Install and Management for vROPs or Wavefront lesson.

Up next, is the lesson which covers Full Stack Visibility.

 

Reclamation of Orphaned VMDKs


In this lesson, we will be looking at the new capability to identify and reclaim orphaned disks or VMDKs in our vSphere infrastructure. For many, this has been an ongoing issue that has been greatly needed to assist the VMware virtual administrators of today.

How Reclaim Works

The Capacity Optimization and Reclaim features are tightly integrated functions that enable you to assess workload status and resource contention in data centers across your environment. You can determine time remaining until CPU, memory, or storage resources run out, and realize cost savings when underutilized VMs can be reclaimed and deployed where needed.

When you open the Reclaim page, graphical representations of all the data centers and custom data centers in your environment appear. By default, they are shown in order of time remaining, beginning from the upper left, where the most constrained data centers appear. To review the status of a data center, click the graphic. This will open the selected data center to display its current details. The how much you can potentially save pane reflects potential capacity savings and indicates a possible cost savings once you have reclaimed underused or powered off VMs. The Total Reclaimable Capacity pane gives details of the reclaimable percentages for CPU, memory, and disk space.

The table at the bottom of the page provides important information about the VMs that offer the most cost savings. The VMs are listed by Powered VMs, Idle VMs, Snapshots and Orphaned Disks. The highest priority heading is at the far left. You can specify what information is included in your reclaim action. For example, when you click a column heading, the table lists, by data center and then by VM, the allocated and reclaimable CPUs and memory, respectively. Then, for example, you can check the box next to one or more VM names and click the EXCLUDE VM(S) button to keep those VMs from being included in any reclaim action. You can also select VMs to resize.

Reclamation Settings

Select the gear icon next to the page heading to customize Reclamation Settings. This affects all data centers. Using the Reclamation Settings, you can exclude, for example all snapshots from being included in the reclaim action - by deselecting the Snapshots check box. Similarly, you can include or exclude powered-off VMs, idle VMs, and orphaned disks.

For more detailed information on the various Reclaim Options, please see the below link.

Reclamation of Orphaned Disks: https://docs.vmware.com/en/vRealize-Operations-Manager/7.5/com.vmware.vcom.core.doc/GUID-4A29FC9A-0876-41CD-9C6B-F37CA30E5757.html


 

Menu - Home

 

If we are not already on the Home tab in the menu bar, do the following step, otherwise we can skip this step.

  1. Click on the Home tab in the menu bar at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Optimize Capacity

 

  1. Click on the Reclaim text link in the Optimize Capacity box in the right-hand side of the user interface.

 

 

Reclaim

 

  1. Click on the Regional Datacenter box to select it and to show the associated information in the views and widgets below it.
  2. We now see information such as monthly cost savings, how many virtual machines and orphaned disks we can reclaim along with the CPU, Memory and Disk Space reclaimable capacity.

NOTE: If there were more than one datacenter or cluster, we would select the most appropriate one that we want to see the associated information.

 

 

Orphaned Disks

 

  1. Click on the Orphaned Disks tab at the bottom of the Reclaim Content Pane.
  2. Take note of the message in yellow that states that the list is updated "daily". This means the job runs once every 24 hours, so if you don't see what you are looking for, we would need the 24 hour period for them to show up.

NOTE: Because the disk sizes are so small in this lab environment, they do not reflect any cost savings. In a true production environment, the disks would be much larger and would reflect savings.

 

 

Orphaned Disks (continued)

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to RegionA01-ISCSI01-COMP01 to expand its menu.
  2. Drag the scroll bar all the way to the bottom of the user interface.
  3. We see in the this lab environment there are two orphaned VMDKs that we can reclaim. It provides us the path to them, how much we can save monthly, the disk space to reclaim and the last modification age.

NOTE: Because the disk sizes are so small in this lab environment, they do not reflect any cost savings. In a true production environment, the disks would be much larger and would reflect savings.

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on Reclamation of Orphaned VMDKs!

In this lesson, we learned that the Reclaim dashboard is listed under the Optimize Capacity column in the Quick Start dashboard. We also saw that we can click on a specific datacenter or cluster if there are multiple to review the information on them individually. Besides Orphaned Disks, the Reclaim dashboard also provides us with information related to Powered Off VMs, Idle VMs, and Snapshots.

If interested in learning more about Reclaiming Orphaned VMDKs, see the Module #3 - Reclamation of Orphaned VMDKs lesson.

Up next is the lesson which covers the Reclamation Based on Allocation Model.

 

New Planning Scenarios


With vRealize Operations 7.5 you can find out with new What-If scenarios for removing virtual machines, removing hosts, adding HCI nodes and expanded coverage of migration planning scenarios for practically any cloud in existence, or any new clouds for that matter.

For both Workload Planning and Physical Infrastructure Planning, the benefits are somewhat obvious. But when you consider that 7.5 now also supports stacking of saved scenarios this creates a lot of new capability for capacity planning.

For example, let’s say you are refreshing a new application while refreshing our hardware. This generates four scenarios: removing old hardware, adding new hardware, adding a new application, removing an old application.

Combining the four scenarios gives me a visualization of the aggregate impact on my SDDC resources. The Hyperconverged Infrastructure What-If scenarios allow you to model expanding vSAN clusters, to understand the cost, amount of additional resources available in a vSAN cluster and how that will address any projected capacity shortfalls.  Compute and storage planning in one, easy to use tool!

Finally, rounding out the new and improved What-If Scenarios is a big improvement in Migration Planning, with updated VMware Cloud on AWS options, additional public cloud providers (Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud Platform, IBM Cloud and of course Amazon Web Services). We also have the ability to add any VMware Cloud Verified provider found through the VMware Cloud Provider Program  by uploading a rate card template with the provider’s published rates or your own negotiated rates with that provider.

This makes it incredibly easy to see which options are the most cost effective based on a selection of providers and available regions. Instance sizes for the virtual machines are also listed with their associated cost.


 

Menu - Home

 

If we are not already on the Home tab in the menu bar, do the following step, otherwise we can skip this step.

  1. Click on the Home tab in the menu bar at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Optimize Capacity

 

  1. Click on the Plan text link in the Optimize Capacity box in the right-hand side of the user interface.

 

 

What-If Analysis

 

In vRealize Operations 7.5, there are numerous What-If planning enhancements. In previous versions, we had the ability to add hosts and virtual machines. We now have the ability to remove hosts and virtual machines. This allows us to see what the result of removing hosts or virtual machines from an environment before actually removing anything.

Also added is the ability to add (HCI) Hyper-Converged Infrastructure hosts which is covered in Module #6 - Enhancements to Integrations With vSAN. And finally, we have added the ability to plan the migration to cloud environments (VMware Cloud on AWS, Azure, Google Cloud Platform and various VMware Verified Cloud Providers).

 

 

Remove VMs and Hosts

 

  1. We see here the newly added REMOVE VMS text link under the Workload Planning box.
  2. Then we see the REMOVE HOSTS text link under the Physical Infrastructure Planning box.

By clicking these new options, you have the ability to see the impact of removing VMs or Hosts from your environment

 

 

Plan Migration

 

Now lets take a look at look at some of the additional options to migrate to the cloud. Prior to version vRealize Operations 7.5, we were able to do migrations to the cloud, but only to (AWS) Amazon Web Services and VMware Cloud on AWS. So lets take a look at what new migration to the cloud options are available now!

  1. Click on PLAN MIGRATION text link in the Migration Planning box on the Quick Start dashboard.

 

 

Migrate To Cloud - IBM Cloud

 

  1. The first of the new cloud providers offered in vRealize Operations 7.5 is a IBM Cloud instance we can migrate to.
  2. Click on the arrow on the far right side to see the rest of the cloud providers.

 

 

Migrate To Cloud - VCPP and Azure

 

  1. Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud are also new cloud destinations for migration.
  2. We see here that we also now have the ability to add our own cloud provider. An example of this would be if we had an instance on one of the (VCPP) VMware Cloud Verified Providers.

NOTE:  (VCPP) VMware Cloud Verified Providers are providers running the VMware stack and offering a public cloud environment and experience to customers much like the large ones like AWS, Azure, and Google. Look for the VMware Cloud Verified logo to find cloud providers committed to driving your organization's digital transformation by enabling you to seamlessly run, manage, connect and secure applications across private and public clouds in a common operating environment. The VMware Cloud Verified logo provides assurance that the VMware Cloud Provider's Program's services are compatible with the VMware Cloud Infrastructure. Find VMware Verified Cloud providers here.

 

 

Scroll

 

  1. Drag the scroll bar all the way to the bottom of the user interface.

 

 

Migrate To Cloud - Cancel

 

  1. Click on the CANCEL button.

 

 

Stack Scenarios - Select

 

  1. Click on the Saved Scenarios tab.

We see here there aren't any saved scenarios for us to view at this time. If there were multiple scenarios, we could select the ones we wanted and run the scenario and it will combine the ones selected together into a single scenario so we can see what the combined affect would be.

 

 

 

Stack Scenarios - Timeline

 

In this example Scenario Timeline image, we see when each of the scenarios are implemented in a staggered manner based off the dates we gave them. We would then click on the RUN SCENARIO button.

NOTE:  This screen capture is only an example image of (3) saved scenarios and then ran all (3) of them simultaneously.

 

 

Stack Scenarios - Time Graph

 

NOTE:  This screen capture is an example image of (3) saved scenarios and then ran all (3) of them simultaneously.

  1. We see that all three scenarios are stacked and each arrow points to the timeline that each one of them is implemented, It is reflected in the steep increase or decrease in the graph on a single day.
  2. By default, the graph is on the timeline for CPU, we could then also look at the Memory and Disk Space graphs if this were a real scenario we were running.

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on New Planning Scenarios (What-If) Modeling!

In this lesson, we learned that there are several new planning options. First we saw that we have added the ability to remove virtual machines under Workload Planning as well as remove hosts under Physical Infrastructure Planning. Next we looked at the additional options for Migrate Planning for migrating to the Cloud that has been added. And finally, we see how now we can stack multiple scenarios together to see the combined end result of them.

If interested in learning more about New Planning Scenarios, see the Module #3 - New Planning (What-If) Modeling lesson.

Up next is the lesson which covers Costing.

 

Set Cost Drivers


In this lesson, we will be discussing the ability to set the cost drivers in vRealize Operations 7.5. Some companies use a charge back method to charge the cost of associated infrastructure costs for the associated business unit, department, etc. The ability to set specific cost drivers is very helpful for IT departments to get a handle on their costs associated to the various components of their infrastructure.

vRealize Operations uses industry standard costs by default for its calculations. However, the industry standard may not be close to a companies actual costs. For example, the industry standard for a specific server is $10,000, a company may customize its server build and cost them maybe $18,000. We see in this example, the costs could be way off. So in vRealize Operations 7.5, we allow our customers to manually adjust their costs for anything from man hours, power, hardware, software licensing, etc. By setting these costs in vRealize Operations, a company can get a very accurate cost breakout for the various components of their infrastructure.

Cost Drivers are the aspect that contributes to the expense of your business operations. Cost drivers provide a link between a pool of costs. To provide a granular cost visibility and to track your expenses of virtual machines accurately in a private cloud, vRealize Operations has identified eight key cost drivers. You can see the total projected expense on your private cloud accounts for the current month and the trend of cost over time.

You can now also set a total cost for the License, Labor, Network, Maintenance, and facilities cost drivers in vRealize Operations.


 

Administration Tab

 

  1. Click on Administration in the Menu bar at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Navigation - Cost Settings

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to Configuration in the Navigation Pane on the left-hand side of the user interface.
  2. Click on Cost Settings under the Configuration drop-down menu.

 

 

Cost Settings - Menu

 

We see that there are (4) main tabs for cost settings in the Content Pane on the right-hand side of the user interface.

  • Cost Drivers - This is where we can actually set costs for various objects such as servers, licensing, storage, etc.
  • Cluster Cost - Shows us the various associated costs for all clusters in our environment.
  • Cloud Providers - We are able to download the latest public cloud provider rate sheets to ensure are costs are accurate.
  • Cost Calculation Status -  We are able to run the calculations to update our costs after we have manually made cost changes or downloaded a new provider rate sheet. This should be ran after any cost changes are made.

 

 

Cost Settings -  Cost Drivers

 

Under the Cost Drivers tab, we see all the cost drivers that we can adjust and set to our actual costs. Take a moment to scroll through and look at the various costs that can be modified.

We are not changing these values in this module, but if any of these needed to be modified, you would click on the Private Cloud Cost Driver entry to see the edit screen.”

NOTE:  Due to lab conditions, your lab values will likely differ from the manual.

 

 

Cost Settings - Cluster Cost

 

  1. Click on the Cluster Cost tab in the Cost Setting's Menu.

 

 

Cost Settings - Cluster Cost

 

Under the Cluster Cost tab, we see all the associated costing information for all of the clusters in our current environment.

 

 

Cost Settings -  Cloud Providers

 

  1. Click on the Cloud Providers tab in the Cost Setting's Menu.

Under Cloud Providers, we see the different cloud providers that we can migrate to. For costing, we use the retail pricing for each provider in our calculations. We can see on the right side for each provider are green arrows, these are where we can download the latest rate sheets for each one.

 

 

Cost Settings - Cost Calculation Status

 

  1. Click on the Cost Calculation Status tab in the Cost Setting's Menu.

Under Cost Calculation Status is where we can update the costs of our environment after we have either manually updated costs or have downloaded a new rate sheet for a provider. We would click the RUN button and once it is finished, the new pricing would be available.

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on setting costs in the Set Cost Drivers!

In this lesson, we learned how we have the options to customize the various cost drivers that affect our physical and virtual infrastructure costs. Again, we can just use the industry standard costs that come out of the box in vRealize Operations 7.5. However, to get a more accurate account of your costs, it is recommended that you input your "actual" real costs into the cost drivers. That way we can get very accurate costing information. This is especially useful for those companies that are charging back their costs to their various business units or departments.

If interested in learning how to customize cost drivers in more detail, see the Module #3 - Set Cost Drivers lesson.

Up next is the lesson which covers the Set Dashboard Time Frame.

 

Set Dashboard Time


In this lesson, we will discuss the new ability to override the dashboard times.

New to vRealize Operations 7.5 is the ability to override the dashboard time. For those dashboards with time-based widgets in them, we can override it and look at the metrics in 1 hour, 4 hour, 24 hour, 7 days and custom time frames. Keep in mind though that many default dashboards do not contain time-based widgets in them, so we can't adjust those particular dashboards.


 

Dashboards

 

  1. Click on the Dashboards tab in the menu bar at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Troubleshoot a VM

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to All Dashboards to expand its menu in the Navigation Pane on the right-hand side of the user interface.
  2. Next, click on Performance Troubleshooting from the All Dashboards drop-down menu.
  3. Then click on Troubleshoot a VM from the Performance Troubleshooting drop-down menu.

 

 

Time Change

 

  1. Click on the vIDM virtual machine to select it.
  2. We see here that the dashboard times can be changed on this dashboard. The reason they can be modified on this dashboard and not others is due to the fact that this dashboard has Time-Based View or Widgets in it. The only way you can change the dashboard times is when these Time-Based Widgets are in the dashboard. So we may have noticed that they were grayed out when going through some other dashboards in previous lessons of this lab.

 

 

Scroll Bar

 

  1. Drag the scroll bar down until we see the 6. Is the VM's demand spiking or abnormal? widget can be seen entirely.

 

 

Show Toolbar

 

  1. Click on the Show Toolbar (eye) icon to show the toolbar for the widget.

NOTE:  The graph in the screen capture will most likely look different than what we see in our actual lab environment.

 

 

Date Controls

 

  1. Click on the Date Controls (calendar) icon to show the date control options.
  2. We see that the Range: is already selected to Dashboard Time. Since this is a time-based widget and the range is set to Dashboard Time, this allows us to now override the default dashboard time frames.
  3. Click on the GO button.

 

 

Change Time

 

  1. Click on 24H to override the default dashboard time to a 24 hour time frame now.

 

 

Change Time - 24 Hour

 

  1. We see that now the 6. Is the VM's demand spiking or abnormal? widget now reflects a 24 hour time period in the chart.

NOTE:  The graph in the screen capture will most likely look different that what we see in our actual lab environment.

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on Override Dashboard Times for all Dashboards!

In this lesson, we learned that there is a new option for us to override the default dashboard time frames for the widgets. We now have the option to change the time frames to 1 hour, 6 hours, 24 hours, 7 days, or set a custom time frame. The key thing we learned is that the only way we can change the default time is when there is a time-based widget inside the dashboard. Then we also have to ensure that the Time Range is set to Dashboard Time for it to be enabled and work.

If interested in learning even more about overriding dashboard times, see the Module #4 - Override Dashboard Times for Dashboards lesson.

Up next is the lesson which covers New Super Metric Editor.

 

New Super Metric Editor


In this lesson, we will discuss the new Super Metric Editor and Metric History.

For those that have previously used the Super Metric Editor in previous versions of vRealize Operations, they will agree that it took some time and effort to get used to creating super metrics. With the new version of the editor, it is much quicker, easier and more intuitive than ever before making it more enjoyable to use!

To set the stage to create a new super metric in this lab, lets pretend that a virtual administrator is asked by their boss to figure out what the average memory utilization is for all their virtual machines. They need to know this because it is that time of year again where they need to figure out their budget for next year. So they need to figure out what the average memory utilization for their virtual machines to better figure out their memory needs for next year. They have an idea of their average annual virtual machine growth each year, so we just need to give them a general average of how much the average virtual machine has. Then use that times the number of annual growth should give them a rough average of how much memory they will need for the following year.


 

Administration Tab

 

We need to go to the Administration tab in order to get to the Configuration settings which is where we can create Super metrics.

  1. Click on the Administration tab in the menu bar at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Configuration

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to Configuration to expand its drop-down menu.
  2. Click on Super Metrics to show the Super metrics view to the right.

 

 

Super Metrics - Edit

 

  1. Click on the Group Total CPU Usage (MHz) super metric that has already been created for us.
  2. Then click on the Edit Selected Super Metric (pencil) icon to look at its properties.

 

 

Super Metrics - Create a Formula

 

  1. Here we see that in this pre-created super metric they used this formula that is looking at virtual machines and their CPU usage. When creating a new super metric, there are numerous options on what metrics to look at.

 

 

Super Metrics - Assign to Object Types

 

We want to modify this super metric while we are in it so that we assign it to the object type of virtual machine.

  1. Click on Assign to Object Types.
  2. Type virtual machine into the Select an Object Type text box.
  3. Then click on Virtual Machine from the drop-down menu to select it.

 

 

Super Metrics - Enable in a Policy

 

  1. Click on Enable in a Policy.
  2. Click on the radio button under Virtual Machine to select it.

 

 

Super Metrics - Finish

 

  1. Click on the FINISH button to save our changes to the super metric.

 

 

 

Now that we are finished creating our super metric, lets go look at the web-01a virtual machine and see how it looks.

  1. Click on the Search icon in the upper right-hand corner of the user interface.

 

 

Search - web-01a

 

  1. Type web-01a into the search text field to search for this virtual machine.
  2. Then click on the web-01a virtual machine to select it.

 

 

web-01a - All Metrics

 

In order to see the Super Metrics for this virtual machine, we need to go to the All metrics tab.

  1. Click on the All Metrics tab.

 

 

web-01a - Minimize

 

  1. Click on the double arrow to minimize the Advanced Topology Relationship view to give us more screen real estate.

 

 

web-01a - All Metrics View

 

  1. Click on the Show Previewable Supermetrics icon to enable it.
  2. If not already expanded, click on the arrow next to All Metrics to expand its drop-down menu.

 

 

web-01a - Super Metric and Preview

 

IMPORTANT NOTE:  From the time we completed creating the new Super Metric, there is a (1) minute refresh cycle that happens. After the first cycle, it should show the new Group Total CPU Usage (MHz) super metric listed under Super Metric as it is in the screen capture.

  1. If need be, click on the arrow next to Super Metric to expand its drop-down menu.

NOTE: If you don't see Super Metric listed in the drop-down menu, wait one minute and refresh (F5 key) the Google Chrome browser and it will show up.

  1. Double-click on Group Total CPU Usage (MHz) to load the data in the view to the right.
  2. If need be, click on the arrow next to Super Metric Preview to expand its drop-down menu.
  3. Double-click on Group Total CPU Usage (MHz) under Super Metric Preview to load the data in the view to the right.

 

 

web-01a - Super Metric and Preview Comparison

 

Here we have the super metric chart and preview, we should see our first metric point.

  1. Hover the mouse pointer over the metric point (purple dot) on the graph to bring up the information pop-up.
  2. The information pop-up tells the date and time the metric point was recorded as well as it references the Group Total CPU Usage (MHz) super metric we just created.

 

 

web-01a - Maximize

 

  1. If need be, click on the double arrow to maximize the Advanced Topology Relationship view to return it to the default setting.

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on New Super Metric Editor!

In this lesson, we learned how to create our own specialized Super Metric. We did this in the new Super Metric Editor which is much easier than previous versions of the editor. We really didn't need to know how to use it and could easily figure out what values to put in based on our desired output. We simply started typing in what variable we were looking for and it would find it for us. Then we also looked at the new Super Metric Preview feature which calculates historic super metric values on the fly.

If interested in learning how to create a custom super metric dashboard, see the Module #4 - New Super Metric Editor & Metric History lesson.

Up next is the lesson which covers View Super Metric History.

 

Custom Compliance Rules and Templates


Keeping your corporate data secure is critical to any business. Personal information such as social security numbers, healthcare records, and credit cards are big business for thieves who sell this information on the black market. Healthcare, banking, and retail industries are high-value targets, but the truth is that any business is at risk. Just think about all the information that your HR department has in their files. Social Security numbers, insurance information, 401k, and payroll make HR data a virtual gold mine. That is why maintaining good security hygiene is the most important role of any IT or security team and why compliance standards have been established.

vRealize Operations 7.5 can help make our compliance headaches a lot less painful by aiding in the initial configuration of our environment as well as managing configuration drift. There are (6) vRealize Operations 7.5 Compliance Packs as well as the vSphere Security Configuration Guide which has been updated to support the vSphere 6.7 U1 guide.

If you are running vRealize Operations Advanced or Enterprise, then you can easily install compliance packs for HIPAA, ISO, DISA, CIS, PCI, and FISMA. These compliance packs will compare your vSphere environment against the applicable hardening guides and generate alerts when configurations are not in compliance.


 

Menu - Home

 

If we are not already on the Home tab in the menu bar, do the following step, otherwise we can skip this step.

  1. Click on the Home tab in the menu bar at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Manage Configuration

 

  1. Click on the Compliance text link in the Manage Configuration box.

 

 

Compliance

 

We see here that there are several compliance standards that we can download and enable such as...

  • vSphere Security Configuration Guide
  • ISO Security Standards
  • PCI Security Standards
  • DISA Compliance
  1. Now click on the arrow twice to see more of the compliance standards.

 

 

Compliance (continued)

 

We see the remainder of the security templates that are available to us.

  • CIS Security Standards
  • HIPAA Security Standards
  • FISMA Security Standards

 

 

Compliance - Create

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to the Actions text link menu to expand the drop-down menu.

We see here that we now also have the ability to create our own specialized custom template in the event that the templates provided don't meet our needs. For example, we could create a simple compliance template to ensure that our VMware licenses are always valid and warn us if they are going to expire soon, etc.

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on Custom Compliance Rules and Templates!

In this lesson, we learned that there are numerous new security templates that can be used to ensure our environment is compliant at all times. We also discussed being able to create our own custom compliance templates.

If interested in learning how to create a custom compliance rule and template, see the Module #5 - Custom Compliance Rules and Templates lesson.

Up next is the lesson which covers the Enhanced Capacity Tab.

 

Log in to the vRealize Operations HVM Instance


This lab environment is running two different instances of vRealize Operations and one instance of vRealize Log Insight. We have the different vRealize Operations instances in order to be able to work through different use cases that have unique requirements. The lab vRealize Operations instances are as follows:

  • Live Instance: Connected to the small running vSphere environment in the lab. There isn't a large inventory of objects in this instance but it allows us to interact with vCenter Server.
  • Historical View Mode (HVM) Instance: Running a time loop of data that was captured in the past. This instance has a much larger inventory of objects but since it is not currently connected to a vCenter Server, we cannot perform any actions here.

In this lesson we will be using the HVM instance of vRealize Operations.

If you are already logged into the HVM (not live) instance of vRealize Operations, click here to skip ahead.


 

Open the Chrome Browser from Windows Quick Launch Task Bar

 

If your browser isn't already open, launch Google Chrome

  1. Click the Chrome icon on the Windows Quick Launch Task Bar

 

 

Open the vRealize Operations - HVM Instance Tab

 

The browser home page has links to the different instances of vRealize Operations that are running in the lab.

  1. Click the vRealize Operations - Historical Instance link to open the vRealize Operations UI in a new browser tab

 

 

Log in to vRealize Operations

 

The user and password information should already be filled in. However, if needed type them in.

username: admin

password: VMware1!

  1. Click LOG IN

 

 

Enhanced Capacity Tab


In this lesson, we will learn about the Enhanced Capacity Tab for Clusters and Datastore Clusters.

With the return of the allocation model, we will also notice a refresh of the Capacity tab when viewing object details. The Time Remaining card and Utilization card are based on the most constrained resource and capacity model. Also, with allocation model enabled, we will be able to see both demand and allocation time remaining for CPU, memory, and disk space.

Clicking on the Capacity Remaining card exposes some other great news, custom virtual machine profiles are back! These are great, high level visualizations of how many virtual machines will fit within a cluster given an "average" virtual machine for the cluster along with any other profiles we wish to create.

We can easily add, edit or remove custom profiles with the Custom Profiles manager. It allows us to set profiles for CPU, memory or disk space using wither demand or allocation for each. Also, Custom Profiles can be unique for each cluster, using policies to assign custom profiles as needed.


 

Home

 

NOTE:  Make sure we are in the (HVM) Historical View Mode instance of vRealize Operations 7.5 before continuing to the next step.

  1. Let's make sure we are on the Home tab. Click on the Home tab at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Optimize Capacity

 

  1. Click on the Assess Capacity text link within the Optimize Capacity box on the Quick Start dashboard.

NOTE:  The Total Savings dollar amount may be different in the lab environment than what is in the screen capture.

 

 

Capacity Overview Page

 

  1. Click on the Production cluster listed under the Overview page.

 

 

Cluster Utilization

 

  1. Drag the scroll bar down until you can see the Cluster Utilization information.
  2. We see here that it gives us the time remaining on our resources based on BOTH Allocation and Demand. As you can see, the remaining time is different depending on if it is demand or allocation. It is good to know both to better understand the utilization in our environment!
  3. Double-click on the Production_North cluster to bring us to the Capacity tab for it.

 

 

Capacity Tab

 

  1. We see in this environment we have a Time Remaining of 42 Days and that we are "most constrained" by Memory Allocation.
  2. Then we see how much remaining time we have for CPU, Memory and Disk Space based on both Allocation and Demand.

 

 

Time Remaining

 

  1. As shown in the picture above, we see the breaking point approximately around Monday July 1st where we run out of allocated memory. Since we have historical data in the lab, your values are slightly different.  Hover your mouse pointer over the intersecting point in order to see the pop-ip information that contains the date, time, Projected Utilization Range (KB), Projected Utilization (KB) and Usable Capacity (KB).
  2. As we can see, we also have the options to present the History and Forecast information based on different time frames.

 

 

Capacity Remaining

 

  1. If need be, scroll up and then click on the Capacity Remaining box to select it.
  2. We now see CPU, memory, and Disk Space resources for both Allocation and Demand now.

 

 

Virtual Machine Remaining

 

  1. We see here that it provides us with an idea of how many virtual machines we can get out of the remaining capacity based on the sizes.
  2. Here we see that we have a Disk Space (Allocation) of 1.54 TB and that we have used 80% (1.23 TB) and have a remaining 20% or 312.04 GB left.

NOTE:  Due to constant lab changes the values in your lab may be slightly different

 

 

CPU Allocation and Demand

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to CPU to expand it.
  2. As shown in the pic above, we see that we have the stats for both Allocation and Demand for CPU. If need be, you may need to scroll down a little to see both the Allocation and Demand stats under CPU.

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on Enhanced Capacity Tab for Clusters and Datastore Clusters!

In this lesson, we learned that the new Capacity Tab has some great information contained in it. We are now able to look at remaining resources (CPU, Memory, and Disk Space) based on Allocation as well as Demand. Depending on which is most important to the organization may dictate which is more important. However, a virtual administrator should pay close attention to both the allocation and demand for the resources to truly understand the time remaining for the resources!

If interested in learning how to create a custom compliance rule and template, see the Module #3 - Enhanced Capacity Tab for Clusters and Datastore Clusters lesson.

Up next is the lesson which covers  Custom Profiles for Capacity Remaining Modeling.

 

Service Now Integration


In vRealize Operations 7.5, we now have native ServiceNow integration. This means that we no longer have to create custom web hooks or shims to make this work. This offers a faster time to resolution out of the box because of the new alert notifications that can send directly to ServiceNow and create an incident. Currently, it is only a one-way communication integration from vRealize Operations 7.5 to ServiceNow.

vRealize Operations 7.5 Alert methods:

  • Log file plugin
  • Rest notifications
  • Email
  • SNMP traps
  • ServiceNow Notification

ServiceNow incidents can be assigned to groups or individuals without custom assignment policies. There are (19) customizable fields including category, business service, impact, assignment group, assigned to and severity.


 

Menu - Administration

 

  1. Click on the Administration menu tab at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Navigation Menu - Management

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to Management in the Navigation Pane to expand it.
  2. Then click on Outbound Settings in the Management drop-down menu.

 

 

Outbound Settings

 

  1. Click on the Service Now item under Outbound Settings.
  2. Then click on the Edit (pencil) icon to go into the Service Now settings.

 

 

Add/Edit Outbound Instance

 

Here we see the pre-configured settings for the ServiceNow integration within the historical instance of vRealize Operations. Since it is already configured and this is only for example purposes of this lesson, we will not modify any of the information in this pop-up window. If we had the password for the associated user account "sa-vrops", we could click on the TEST button to verify account access to ServiceNow.

  1. Click on the CANCEL button to ensure no changes are made in this pop-up window.

 

 

Menu - Alerts

 

  1. Click on the Alerts menu tab at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Alert Settings

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to Alert Settings to expand the alert settings drop-down menu.
  2. Then click on Notification Settings in the alert settings drop-down menu.

 

 

Notification Settings

 

NOTE:  The items may be listed in a different order than what we are seeing in our lab environment.

  1. Click on the item SNOW - ECommerce Virtual Machine CPU usage is at 100% for an extended period of time under Notification Settings.  
  2. Then click on the Edit (pencil) icon to edit the item.

 

 

Edit Rule

 

Here we see the Edit Rule pop-up window which contains all the settings for this rule.

  1. We see that this is already configured for the Method Service-Now Notification Plugin for Service Now.
  2. Here is where the (19) customizable items are listed.

 

 

Edit Rule - Scroll Bar

 

  1. Click on the Scroll Bar and drag it all the way to the bottom in order to see the remainder of the customizable items.

 

 

Edit Rule - Customizable Items

 

  1. Here we see the remainder of the customizable items.

 

 

Filter Criteria

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to Scope to see the Scope sub menu.
  2. Then click on Applications in the Scope sub menu.

 

 

Scope - Applications

 

After we selected Applications from the Scope drop-down menu, we now see that it presents to us another drop-down menu to the right of where we selected Applications.

  1. Click on the arrow to select the specific application we want for the scope.
  2. Then click on E-Commerce from the drop-down menu.

 

 

Criticality - Critical

 

  1. We see that we already have the alert definition set as VIRTUAL MACHINE CPU USAGE IS AT 100% FOR AN E..., we are going to keep this setting.
  2. Click on the arrow for the Criticality selection.
  3. Then click on Critical from the drop-down menu.

 

 

Criticality - Critical & Immediate

 

We now see that the Criticality is set to alert for Critical alerts.

 

 

Save

 

In this lab environment, we technically do not have the ServiceNow application/server running to connect to, so saving the changes we made does not actually affect anything.

  1. Click on the SAVE button so our changes are saved.

In this lesson, we learned that vRealize Operations 7.5 now has native ServiceNow integration. This means that we no longer have to create custom web hooks or shims to make this work. This offers a faster time to resolution out of the box because of the new alert notifications that can send directly to ServiceNow and create an incident.

If interested in learning more about the ServiceNow integration, see the Module #4 - Service Now Integration lesson.

 

Module 2 -Enhancements in Performance Optimization (15 minutes)

Introduction


This lab module a brief overview of the following topics:

  • Enhanced Host-Based Optimization & Violation Visualizations  

Log in to the vRealize Operations HVM Instance


This lab environment is running two different instances of vRealize Operations and one instance of vRealize Log Insight. We have the different vRealize Operations instances in order to be able to work through different use cases that have unique requirements. The lab vRealize Operations instances are as follows:

  • Live Instance: Connected to the small running vSphere environment in the lab. There isn't a large inventory of objects in this instance but it allows us to interact with vCenter Server.
  • Historical View Mode (HVM) Instance: Running a time loop of data that was captured in the past. This instance has a much larger inventory of objects but since it is not currently connected to a vCenter Server, we cannot perform any actions here.

In this lesson we will be using the HVM instance of vRealize Operations.

If you are already logged into the HVM (not live) instance of vRealize Operations, click here to skip ahead.


 

Open the Chrome Browser from Windows Quick Launch Task Bar

 

If your browser isn't already open, launch Google Chrome

  1. Click the Chrome icon on the Windows Quick Launch Task Bar

 

 

Open the vRealize Operations - HVM Instance Tab

 

The browser home page has links to the different instances of vRealize Operations that are running in the lab.

  1. Click the vRealize Operations - Historical Instance link to open the vRealize Operations UI in a new browser tab

 

 

Log in to vRealize Operations

 

The user and password information should already be filled in. However, if needed type them in.

username: admin

password: VMware1!

  1. Click LOG IN

 

 

Enhanced Host-Based Optimization & Violation Visualizations


In this lesson, we will look at the enhanced Host-Based Optimization in vRealize Operations 7.5. This enhanced feature adds the ability to create Host Groups. We have enhanced the Workload Optimization cluster details to show host groups created through the Business Intent settings. There is optimization for host groups to avoid risk (aka moderate) regardless of the datacenter operational setting (balance, consolidated, etc). A non-green host group sets the datacenter to Not Optimized.

For example, if we use Business Intent to enforce placement of virtual machines on specific hosts for license cost reduction, Workload Optimization automatically creates host groups in (DRS) Distributed Resource Scheduler (as well as virtual machine groups). Now, we can dig deeper into cluster utilization to see how each of the host groups is using CPU and memory. vRealize Operations 7.5 will automatically build DRS affinity rules based on the tags and also report if VMs are running on the wrong hosts.

We also have a new Host Group Workload Visualization which reviews host group level CPU and memory workloads. The objects seen are "in memory" objects, not actual objects in vCenter. This visualization lets us look under the covers a little deeper to see if we really are optimized in a cluster. So we are able to get a deeper look into the cluster and if it is truly optimized or not. When creating a new Host Group, they are not a vCenter object in the traditional sense such as a datacenter or cluster.

 

For example, in the screenshot there are two clusters in this datacenter. The datacenter itself is set to an Operational Intent of “Balance” and a Business Intent for Host Based License Enforcement. The clusters themselves are balanced well, however that does not mean everything is running smoothly. Notice that the Linux host group on cluster 02 is showing very high CPU workload, while the Linux host group in cluster 01 has much lower CPU workload. The datacenter needs to be optimized to alleviate this high workload on the Host Group. Running Workload Optimization will migrate Linux virtual machines from cluster 02 to cluster 01, ensuring they stay within the appropriate Host Groups and honoring license enforcement.

If a cluster is constrained and cannot meet Operational Intent due to restrictions placed by Business Intent (for example, both Linux host groups above are CPU constrained), then we can see where the bottleneck is within host groups and decide which of them needs more resources (then we can run a What-If scenario to plan for more hosts).


 

Home

 

NOTE:  Make sure we are in the (HVM) Historical View Mode instance of vRealize Operations 7.5 before continuing to the next step.

  1. Let's make sure we are on the Home tab. Click on the Home tab at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Quick Start

 

  1. In the Optimize Performance widget, click on the Workload Optimization text link.

NOTE:  The number of events in our lab environment may reflect differently than what we see in the screen capture.

 

 

Workload Optimization - Production

 

Since we only have a single datacenter in this environment, we see it is already showing the details in the content pane for the Regional Datacenter. There is no need to click on it, if there were numerous ones listed, we would then need to click on the appropriate one to see its associated information.

  1. Click on the Production datacenter in the Workload Optimization dashboard.

 

 

Production Cluster - Current State

 

Scroll down until you can see the "Are your clusters meeting your utilization objection?" tile and the contents of the widget.

We see currently all the clusters have no Host Groups of any types assigned to them. We know this because for each of the clusters, there is no option to expand the cluster to see a sub-menu under them. There would be an arrow that we could click on to expand it if there were Host Groups assigned.

So lets now go in and setup Host Groups based on operating system licensing since in this environment we have Microsoft, Linux and Oracle operating systems. One main purpose of setting up the Host Groups for licensing is to ensure that the associated virtual machines stay within the same cluster as their associated operating system. This ensures for example that all the virtual machines with Oracle stay on the same cluster hence reducing the licensing need to license Oracle. If we didn't do that, we would have to license ALL hosts that the Oracle-based virtual machines "could" migrate to.

 

 

Business Intent

 

  1. If needed, scroll until you can see the Business Intent Widget, then click on the Edit text link.

 

 

Business Intent - Edit

 

  1. Click on the radio button under Hosts to select it.
  2. Click on the arrow next to Operating System to expand its menu.
  3. Click on the arrow for Tag Category and select License Enforcement.
  4. Then click on the INCLUDE TAG button to add the entry.

 

 

Scroll Bar

 

  1. Drag the the scroll bar to the bottom of the pop-up box.

 

 

View Conflicting DRS Rules Button

 

  1. Then click on the check box next to I understand that vRealize Operations will disable all my current and future DRS rules.
  2. Then click on the VIEW CONFLICTING DRS RULES button to review it.

 

 

View Conflicting DRS Rules

 

One thing to keep in mind, we would want to carefully consider what will happen with the conflicting rules. We may need to remove any rules that we have configured within the vCenter server and then make the appropriate changes inside vRealize Operations. We don't want to have (DRS) Distributed Resource Scheduler, Affinity/Anti-Affinity and vRealize Operations rules conflicting with each other constantly. So it is wise to put some thought into what we would need and how best to configure them within vRealize Operations preferably.

  1. Then click on the SAVE button.

 

 

Scroll Bar

 

  1. Drag the scroll bar all the way to the bottom of the screen so we can see all of the clusters.

 

 

Clusters - Host Groups

 

  1. Drag the column separator to the right so we can see the entire name of the Host Group for each one.

NOTE:  We may have to decrease the VM Name column on far right, then it will auto expand the Name column.

  1. Click the arrow next to Product_East to expand it.
  2. Click the arrow next to Product_South to expand it.

We see that since we setup the Business Intent using the tag of License Enforcement (All) by Operating System, it has created the associated Host Groups. It created Host Groups for Windows, Linux and Oracle which are the three options of operating system licensing.

 

 

Business Intent Violation Visualizations Overview

 

Next we will discuss the new Business Intent Violation Visualizations feature.

Along with host group visibility, we can now get more specific detail on Business Intent tag violations. Previously, in Workload Optimization, we would only see the tag involved in the violation at the datacenter level as we see in this screen capture. That was helpful, but it would be better to know which objects are triggering the violation. Now we can easily find out which virtual machines are not where they need to be according to the Business Intent.

Host Groups require that we have more than two hosts in a cluster typically. Because of this, we can't fully demonstrate this in this lab environment due to limitations. However, the (HVM) Historical View Mode instance is setup with them due to the number of hosts and clusters in the system. The one thing to note, is that we do not have access to the vCenter attached to the HVM instance to view the configurations. So we will use some screen captures to tell the story.

 

 

HVM Host Group Configuration

 

This slide represents the (HVM) Historical View Mode instance instance of vRealize Operations 7.5 that we currently are in. We see that there are (3) Host Groups (Microsoft, Linux, and Oracle) which are represented by the color codes on the left. We have the Production_East cluster in the Production environment that is represented in this slide image.

In the Production_East cluster, the virtual machines are represented by the small black boxes within each host. So the (2) boxes in Host #1 and Host #2 represent (2) virtual machines with Linux on them since it is a green host. Host #3 is an Oracle box since it is pink and Host #4 is a Microsoft host since it is blue.

The Host Groups which is a per-cluster concept is keeping the virtual machines balanced on the hosts according to the license groups. So in the slide, the virtual machines are as balanced as they can be in the current Host Group licensing configuration.

Now lets look at the (HVM) Historical View Mode instance of vRealize Operations 7.5 again that we are still in to see what it looks like in the user interface.

 

 

Production_East

 

  1. If need be, click on the arrow next to Production_East to expand it and show the associated Host Groups in this cluster.

We see that just like the previous slide image, this cluster has (3) Host Groups consisting of groups for Linux, Microsoft (MSFT) and Oracle. We also see that all the hosts are balanced across the cluster as previously stated.

  1. Note that we have the Violated Tags and VM Name columns. These two columns are the new Violation Visualization that we were referring of earlier in this lesson. In the lab environment, we see there are no violations at this time.

 

 

Violation Visualizations

 

NOTE:  This image is NOT from the lab environment we are currently in, this is for example purposes since we can not create this example in our lab environment. This example represents the new Violation Visualizations we discussed in the previous step.

  1. We see under the Validated Tags column it shows that we have violated the Gold SLA Tiering which would be similar to the ones in our lab environment based on licensing violations (Linux, Microsoft, or Oracle).
  2. We see under the VM Name column it shows that the BCA-Billing-Web-09 virtual machine is the one that violated the Gold SLA Tier. So now we now exactly what virtual machine is violating any of our rules.

So we now will know what specificity has been violated as well as what virtual machine is violating it!

 

Conclusion


Congratulations, we have just completed Module #2 - Enhancements in Performance Optimization!

In this module, we learned that we have enhanced the Host-Based Optimization function. We started off by creating a Host-Based rule that created (3) Host Groups for each of our license types (Linux, Microsoft, or Oracle) for what we have in our (HVM) Historical View Mode instance of vRealize Operations 7.5. Then we discussed the new Violation Visualizations which add the Violated Tags and VM Name columns which let us know what was violated and which virtual machine(s) are in violation of those rules.  

Up next is Module #3 - Enhancements in Capacity and Costing Optimization.


 

You've finished Module 2!

If you are looking for information related to what lessons we accomplished in this module, please see the below reference links.

If you are looking for additional information on (vROPs) vRealize Operations 7.5 enhancements in Performance Optimization, try one of these:

If you are looking for additional information on vRealize Operations, you can start here: https://www.vmware.com/products/vrealize-suite.html

You may proceed to the next module by advancing to the next page. If you want to jump to a particular module, follow one of the links below.

 

 

How to End Lab

 

Or if you want to end your lab,

  1. Click on the END button at the top of the page.

 

Module 3 - Enhancements in Capacity and Costing Optimization (45 minutes)

Introduction


This lab module a brief overview of the following topics:

  • Reclamation of Orphaned VMDKs
  • Enhanced Capacity Tab for Clusters and Datastore Clusters
  • Custom Profiles for Capacity Remaining Modeling
  • Reclamation Based on Allocation Model
  • New Planning (What-If) Modeling
  • Set Cost Drivers  

Log in to the vRealize Operations Live Instance


This lab environment is running two different instances of vRealize Operations and one instance of vRealize Log Insight. We have the different vRealize Operations instances in order to be able to work through different use cases that have unique requirements. The lab instances are as follows:

  • Live Instance: Connected to the small running vSphere environment in the lab. There isn't a large inventory of objects in this instance but it allows us to interact with vCenter Server.
  • Historical View Mode (HVM) Instance: Running a time loop of data that was captured in the past. This instance has a much larger inventory of objects but since it is not currently connected to a vCenter Server, we cannot perform any actions here.

In this lesson we will be using the live Instance of vRealize Operations.

If you are already logged into the live (not historical) instance of vRealize Operations, click here to skip ahead.


 

Open the Chrome Browser from Windows Quick Launch Task Bar

 

If your browser isn't already open, launch Google Chrome

  1. Click the Chrome icon on the Windows Quick Launch Task Bar

 

 

Open the vRealize Operations - Live Instance Tab

 

The browser home page has links to the different instances of vRealize Operations that are running in the lab.

  1. Click the vRealize Operations - Live Instance link to open the vRealize Operations UI in a new browser tab

 

 

Log in to vRealize Operations

 

vRealize Operations is integrated with VMware Identity Manager which we will use for user authentication in this lab.

VMware Identity Manager should be pre-selected as the identity source. However, if it is not you will choose it.

  1. Click the drop-down arrow
  2. Select VMware Identity Manager
  3. Click REDIRECT to take you to the authentication page

 

 

 

VMware Identity Manager Login

 

For this vRealize Operations instance, the lab uses VMware Idenity Manager as the authentication provider. This allows for seamless integration with vRealize Log Insight.

The user and password information should already be filled in. However, if needed type them in.

username: holuser

password: VMware1!

  1. Click Sign in

 

Reclamation of Orphaned VMDKs


In this lesson, we will discuss the new view which contains a list of potential Orphaned VMDKs for Reclamation.

In vRealize Operations 7.5, we will now provide a list of orphaned disk files on your datastores so we can investigate and remove them to reclaim the disk space. This is another customer favorite and a huge time saver for administrators. Virtual administrators are always looking for ways to regain storage space and orphaned disks are a great way to do that!

What are orphaned disks? Basically, virtual machine disk files that are no longer attached to a virtual machine (for example, a virtual machine was removed from inventory but not deleted from disk). This can be an issue since they do not show up in the vCenter inventory and thus can create disk space constraints with no clear understanding of where the space is being used.

Now we can see a list of orphaned disks on the Reclaim page. We can see the cost associated with the orphaned disks, as well as the length of time the disk has been untouched (the “last modification age”). We can export the list to (CSV) Comma-Separated Value for further review and reference during cleanup. And finally, we can exclude any orphaned disks found from the Reclaim page in case they are being kept for a specific reason (such as archival, legal or compliance needs).


 

Orphaned Disks - Example

 

We see here an example from an environment that has actual orphaned disks, their sizes, the duration, and how much could be saved. This image is just an example of what it would look like in a production environment. We also see that this dashboard provides information on Powered Off VMs, Idle VMs, and Snapshots.

 

 

Home

 

NOTE:  Make sure we are in the Live instance of vRealize Operations 7.5 before continuing to the next step.

  1. Let's make sure we are on the Home tab. Click on the Home tab at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Optimize Capacity

 

  1. Click on the Reclaim text link in the Optimize Capacity column.

 

 

Regional Datacenter

 

  1. Click anywhere inside the Regional Datacenter box to select it and to show the associated information in the content panes below it.

NOTE: If there were more than one datacenter or cluster, we would select the most appropriate one that we want to see the associated information. The values in the lab we are currently working from could be different than what you see in the screen capture.

 

 

Regional Datacenter - Details

 

After clicking on the Regional Datacenter, we now see the details of the datacenter which includes the following information:

  • How much you can potentially save:
    • Monthly Cost Savings
    • Number of VMs with Reclaimable resources
    • Number of Orphaned Disks to Reclaim
  • Total Reclaimable Capacity:
    • Number of vCPU's
    • Memory
    • Disk Space

NOTE:  The values in the lab we are currently working from could be different than what we see in the screen capture.

 

 

Orphaned Disks

 

  1. Click on the Orphaned Disks tab at the bottom of the Reclaim Content Pane.

Take note of the message in yellow that states that the list is updated "daily". This means the job runs once every 24 hours, so if you don't see what you are looking for in a production infrastructure, we would need to wait until the next day for it to show up.

  1. Then click on the down-arrow next to RegionA01-ISCSI01-COMP01 datastore to expand it and show any and all orphaned disks in it. We may need to scroll down a little to see both orphaned disks.  
  2. We see in the this lab environment there are two orphaned disks totally 65 MB that we could reclaim. Keep in mind this is a lab environment and in a true production environment, the disks would be much larger. This is also why in the lab environment, the two orphaned disks don't show any dollar value if we were to reclaim them. The size of these disks in the lab environment are so small, they don't show a value. Again, in a production environment, there is a very large potential to save a lot of money by reclaiming the orphaned disks.

NOTE:  Some of the information in the screen capture may be different than our lab environment such as the Last Modification Age, etc.

 

 

Exclude Disks

 

Now lets pretend that this first orphaned disk (*...orphan-2.vmdk) is there for a good reason because an administrator wants to save it for emergency purposes. We don't want another administrator to come along and delete it just for the fact that it is an orphaned disk, so lets exclude the disk so it doesn't show up in the list of orphaned disks.

  1. Click on the check box next to the first orphaned disk (*...orphan-2.vmdk) in the list.
  2. Then click on the EXCLUDE DISK(S) button to exclude this particular orphaned disk.

 

 

Exclude Disks - Verify

 

  1. Click on the EXCLUDE DISK(S) button to verify that we want to exclude this disk.

 

 

Show Excluded Disks Button

 

  1. Click on the SHOW EXCLUDED DISKS button.

 

 

Excluded Disks

 

We now see the orphaned disk that we just excluded is listed under the Excluded Disks. Now it no longer will show up in the main list of orphaned disks making it less likely for another administrator to come along and delete it to regain resources. By being in the excluded disks section, it tells the other administrators it is there for a specific reason and not to reclaim it for any reason.  

 

 

Include Disks

 

Now lets say the orphaned disk we selected was the incorrect one and we do not need to save it. We can include the disk back which is the reverse of what we did to exclude the disk.  

  1. Click on the check box next to the excluded disk (*...orphan-2.vmdk).
  2. Now click on the INCLUDE DISK(S) button to return the disk back to the orphaned disks list of virtual machines.

 

 

Export

 

There are times for example where we may want a list of reclaimable resources listed in a file. Its generally a good idea not to just reclaim orphaned disks without checking with everyone else first in case it is being kept for a good reason. So we can export the list of orphaned disks in a (CSV) Comma Separated Value file format. So lets see how to export the list to a CSV file.

  1. Click on the EXPORT ALL button to export the data into a CSV file.

 

 

Open CSV

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to the orphaned-disks_Re....csv file on the bottom left-hand side of the browser window.
  2. Then click on Open to open the CSV file.

 

 

Exported Info

 

Here we see the exported data showing the following information in the CSV file:

  • vCenter Name
  • Datacenter Name
  • Datastore Name
  • VMDK Location
  • Cost Savings
  • Reclaimable Disk Space
  • Last Modification Date/Time

NOTE:  Some of the information in the screen capture may be different than our lab environment such as the Last Modification Age, etc.

 

 

Close CSV File

 

  1. Click on the X in the upper right-hand corner of the CSV file to close it.

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on Reclamation of Orphaned VMDKs!

In this lesson, we learned that the Reclaim dashboard is listed under the Optimize Capacity column in the Quick Start dashboard. We also saw that we can click on a specific datacenter or cluster if there are multiple to review the information on them individually. Besides Orphaned Disks, the Reclaim dashboard also provides us with information related to Powered Off VMs, Idle VMs, and Snapshots.

Up next is the lesson which covers Enhanced Capacity Tab for Clusters and Datastore Clusters.

 

Log in to the vRealize Operations HVM Instance


This lab environment is running two different instances of vRealize Operations and one instance of vRealize Log Insight. We have the different vRealize Operations instances in order to be able to work through different use cases that have unique requirements. The lab vRealize Operations instances are as follows:

  • Live Instance: Connected to the small running vSphere environment in the lab. There isn't a large inventory of objects in this instance but it allows us to interact with vCenter Server.
  • Historical View Mode (HVM) Instance: Running a time loop of data that was captured in the past. This instance has a much larger inventory of objects but since it is not currently connected to a vCenter Server, we cannot perform any actions here.

In this lesson we will be using the HVM instance of vRealize Operations.

If you are already logged into the HVM (not live) instance of vRealize Operations, click here to skip ahead.


 

Open the Chrome Browser from Windows Quick Launch Task Bar

 

If your browser isn't already open, launch Google Chrome

  1. Click the Chrome icon on the Windows Quick Launch Task Bar

 

 

Open the vRealize Operations - HVM Instance Tab

 

The browser home page has links to the different instances of vRealize Operations that are running in the lab.

  1. Click the vRealize Operations - Historical Instance link to open the vRealize Operations UI in a new browser tab

 

 

Log in to vRealize Operations

 

The user and password information should already be filled in. However, if needed type them in.

username: admin

password: VMware1!

  1. Click LOG IN

 

 

Enhanced Capacity Tab for Clusters and Datastore Clusters


In this lesson, we will learn about the Enhanced Capacity Tab for Clusters and Datastore Clusters.

With the return of the allocation model, we will also notice a refresh of the Capacity tab when viewing object details. The Time Remaining card and Utilization card are based on the most constrained resource and capacity model. Also, with allocation model enabled, we will be able to see both demand and allocation time remaining for CPU, memory, and disk space.

Clicking on the Capacity Remaining card exposes some other great news, custom virtual machine profiles are back! These are great, high level visualizations of how many virtual machines will fit within a cluster given an "average" virtual machine for the cluster along with any other profiles we wish to create.

We can easily add, edit or remove custom profiles with the Custom Profiles manager. It allows us to set profiles for CPU, memory or disk space using wither demand or allocation for each. Also, Custom Profiles can be unique for each cluster, using policies to assign custom profiles as needed.


 

Home

 

NOTE:  Make sure we are in the (HVM) Historical View Mode instance of vRealize Operations 7.5 before continuing to the next step.

  1. Let's make sure we are on the Home tab. Click on the Home tab at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Optimize Capacity

 

  1. Click on the Assess Capacity text link within the Optimize Capacity column.

NOTE:  Due to the lab environment, the TOTAL SAVINGS OPPORTUNITY may display a different amount in your lab instance.

 

 

Capacity Overview Page

 

  1. Click on the Production cluster listed under the Overview page.

 

 

Cluster Utilization

 

  1. Drag the scroll bar down until you can see the Cluster Utilization information.
  2. We see here that it gives us the time remaining on our resources based on BOTH Allocation and Demand. As we can see, the remaining time is different depending on if it is demand or allocation. It is good to know both to better understand the utilization in our environment!
  3. Double-click on the Production_North cluster to bring us to the Capacity tab for it.

 

 

Capacity Tab

 

  1. We see in this environment we have a Time Remaining of 42 Days and that we are "most constrained" by Memory Allocation.
  2. Then we see how much remaining time we have for CPU, memory and Disk Space based on both Allocation and Demand.

 

 

Time Remaining

 

  1. Here we see the breaking point approximately around Monday July 1st where we run out of allocated memory. Hover your mouse pointer over the intersecting point in order to see the pop-up information that contains the date, time, Projected Utilization Range (KB), Projected Utilization (KB) and Usable Capacity (KB).
  2. As we can see, we also have the options to present the History and Forecast information based on different time frames.

NOTE:  This is a representation of historical data as if we were looking at the environment in mid-June.

 

 

Capacity Remaining

 

  1. Click on the Capacity Remaining box to select it.
  2. We now see CPU, Memory, and Disk Space resources for both Allocation and Demand now.

 

 

Virtual Machine Remaining

 

  1. We see here that it provides us with an idea of how many virtual machines we can get out of the remaining capacity based on the sizes.
  2. Here we see that we have a Disk Space (Allocation) of 1.54 TB and that we have used 80% (1.23 TB) and have a remaining 20% or 312.04 GB left.

 

 

CPU Allocation and Demand

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to CPU to expand it.
  2. We see that we have the stats for both Allocation and Demand for CPU.

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on Enhanced Capacity Tab for Clusters and Datastore Clusters!

In this lesson, we learned that the new Capacity Tab has some great information contained in it. We are now able to look at remaining resources (CPU, Memory, and Disk Space) based on Allocation as well as Demand. Depending on which is most important to the organization may dictate which is more important. However, a virtual administrator should pay close attention to both the allocation and demand for the resources to truly understand the time remaining for the resources!

Up next is the lesson which covers Custom Profiles for Capacity Remaining Modeling.

 

Custom Profiles for Capacity Remaining Modeling


In this lesson, we will discuss the ability to create new Custom Profiles for the Capacity Remaining Model for virtual machines.

As in most cases, one size does not fit everyone! This holds true for virtual machines in everyone's virtual environments. Most organizations have standard builds for their various types of virtual machines, typically using templates. Based on what the server will be used for (Web, Database, etc.) will determine how much resources are allocated to them typically.

So when we are looking at the remaining capacity like we did in the last lesson, it would be helpful to have the virtual machines sizes that are relevant to our environment. So we will learn how to create a new virtual machine profile so that we can see the capacity remaining based on that profile we created. We will create a new virtual machine profile for a database server with


 

Menu - Administration

 

  1. Click on the Administration tab in the Menu Bar at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Configuration

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to Configuration in the Navigation Pane on the left side of the user interface.
  2. Then click on Custom Profiles.

 

 

Custom Profiles

 

We see that under Custom Profiles, we already have a Large, Medium, Small, and Web Server profile built. We also see that we can create a new custom profile, edit an existing one, or delete one.

  1. Click on the Large profile to select it.
  2. Click on the Edit (pencil) icon to edit the Large profile to look at its settings.

 

 

Custom Profiles - Edit

 

Here we see all the settings in the Large profile. We can import the settings from and existing virtual machine in the vCenter server or we can manually set the configurations for all the compute resources that we see listed in the Edit Selected Profile pop-up window.

  1. Click on the CANCEL button.

 

 

Home Tab

 

Now that we finished looking at the custom profiles that were already created for us, lets go create our own custom virtual machine profile for our database servers.

  1. Click on the Home tab in the menu bar at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Optimize Capacity

 

  1. Click on the Assess Capacity text link within the Optimize Capacity box.

 

 

Capacity Overview Page

 

  1. Click on the Production cluster listed under the Overview page.

 

 

Cluster Utilization

 

  1. Double-click on the Production_North cluster to bring us to the Capacity tab for it.

 

 

Capacity Remaining

 

  1. Click on the Capacity Remaining box to select it.

 

 

Large VM Profile

 

  1. Click on the 1 to the right of the Large VM profile to see the settings of the Large VM profile.

This is another way to see what settings are set for a virtual machine profile quickly instead of going into Administration > Configuration > Custom Profiles as we did previously.

 

 

Add Database Profile

 

  1. Click on the Plus Sign to add a new virtual machine profile.

 

 

Applicable Profiles

 

  1. Click on the Add Profile (green plus sign) icon to add a new profile.

 

 

Add New Profile - Name

 

  1. Type Database Server into the Profile Name text field.
  2. Keep the default setting of Virtual Machine for the Object Type.

 

 

Add New Profile - Metrics

 

  1. Click on the pencil icon to left of the vCPUs text for the CPU Allocation row.
  2. Type 10 for the value of CPU Allocation.
  3. Click on the pencil icon to left of the GB text for the Memory Allocation row.
  4. Type 24 for the value of Memory Allocation.
  5. Click on the pencil icon to far right side and change to GB for the Memory Allocation row.

 

 

Add New Profile - Metrics (continued)

 

  1. Click on the pencil icon to left of the GB text for the Disk Space Allocation row.
  2. Type 300 for the value of Disk Space Allocation.
  3. Click on the OK button to save the changes.

 

 

Add New Profile - Review

 

  1. Click on the OK button to finalize the changes.

 

 

Virtual Machines Remaining

 

  1. We see that our new Database Server virtual machine profile is now listed.

NOTE: We see that there is a question mark beside the Database Server profile instead of a number. This is due to the fact that a service runs every 24 hours and we will need to wait the 24 hours before it will reflect how many of them are remaining.

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on Custom Profiles for Capacity Remaining Modeling!

In this lesson, we learned that we can create custom profiles easily and quickly to suit our needs for the Capacity Remaining Model of our virtual machines. We created a Database Server virtual machine profile so we can see how easy it is to create a custom one to fit our needs.

Up next is the lesson which covers Reclamation Based on Allocation Model.

 

Reclamation Based on Allocation Model


In this lesson, we will discuss Reclamation Based on the Allocation Model.

Since vRealize Operations 7.5 has brought back the ability to have the Allocation-Based model again, that also means that we can reclaim resources based on Allocation instead of Demand if we desire. The key thing to remember though, is that we must already have the Allocation model enabled in the currently used policy. Otherwise, the reclaimed resource data will be based off of the Demand model.

We will see that we can only see Allocation-based reclaimable data for some of the views, but not all of them.


 

Menu - Home

 

If we are not already on the Home tab in the menu bar, do the following step, otherwise we can skip this step.

  1. Click on the Home tab in the menu bar at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Optimize Capacity

 

  1. Click on the Reclaim text link in the Optimize Capacity column.

 

 

Reclaim

 

  1. Click on the Production cluster.

 

 

Idle VMs

 

  1. Click on the Idle VMs tab.

 

 

Reclaimable Resources

 

One thing to be sure we understand is that once we have enabled Allocation in regards to reclaiming resources, the represented reclaimable resources are represented on the Allocation-based model and NOT the Demand-Based model. So it is important to remember this when reviewing the reclaimable resource information.

  1. Drag the Scroll Bar down to the bottom so you can see the list of reclaimable resources.
  2. Click on the arrow next to Production_East to expand its resources.
  3. Click on the arrow next to Production_West to expand its resources.

 

 

Demand vs. Allocation Chart

 

This chart is used to help us understand the differences in Demand or Allocation based reclaimable resources. If interested in the details of Virtual Machine Metrics, click here for the entire list of them.

 

 

Demand vs. Allocation - Reclaimable Resources

 

  1. We see here that we have a color coded chart which tells us which color represents either Demand or Allocation based resource numbers.
  2. For the Production_East cluster, we see the column dividers are a light blue color which represents the calculations are based off of Demand. Another quick way to tell is that the Disk Space column number is represented in bytes instead of GB.
  3. For the Production_West cluster, we see the column dividers are a dark blue color which represents the calculations are based off of Allocation. Another quick way to tell is that the Disk Space column number is represented in GB instead of bytes.

 

 

Powered Off VMs

 

  1. Click on the Powered Off VMs tab.
  2. We see that in this tab, we also have the color coding to signify whether they are based off of Demand or Allocation.

NOTE: If we were to click on the Snapshots or Orphaned Disks tabs, we would see that the color coded legend is not there because these two tabs do not reflect the associated information based off of the Allocation model.

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on Reclamation Based on Allocation Model!

In this lesson, we learned that when we go to the dashboard containing the reclaimable resources such as Powered Off VMs, Idle VMs, Snapshots and Orphaned Disks, we are able to see the data based off of both the Demand and Allocation models. However, only the Powered Off VMs and the Idle VMs tabs reflect both. The remaining two tabs show information based off of the Demand model.

Up next is the lesson which covers New Planning (What-If) Modeling.

 

New Planning (What-If) Modeling


In this lesson, we will be looking at all the new Planning (What-If) Models that have been added to vRealize Operations 7.5.

With vRealize Operations 7.5 you can find out with new What-If scenarios for removing virtual machines, removing hosts, adding (HCI) Hyper-Converged Infrastructure nodes and expanded coverage of migration planning scenarios for practically any cloud in existence, or any new clouds for that matter.

For both Workload Planning and Physical Infrastructure Planning, the benefits are somewhat obvious. But when you consider that 7.5 now also supports stacking of saved scenarios this creates a lot of new capability for capacity planning.

For example, a hardware refresh. During a refresh of ESXi hosts, you will be removing old hardware and replacing it with new hardware. In the screenshot below, not only am I refreshing hardware but also on-boarding a new application and retiring an old one.

Combining the four scenarios gives me a visualization of the aggregate impact on my SDDC resources. The Hyperconverged Infrastructure What-If scenarios allow you to model expanding vSAN clusters, to understand the cost, amount of additional resources available in a vSAN cluster and how that will address any projected capacity shortfalls.  Compute and storage planning in one, easy to use tool!

Finally, rounding out the new and improved What-If Scenarios is a big improvement in Migration Planning, with updated VMware Cloud on AWS options, additional public cloud providers (Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud Platform, IBM Cloud and of course Amazon Web Services). We also have the ability to add any cloud provider, such as a VMware Cloud Provider by uploading a rate card template with the provider’s published rates or your own negotiated rates with that provider.

This makes it incredibly easy to see which options are the most cost effective based on a selection of providers and available regions. Instance sizes for the virtual machines are also listed with their associated cost.

In regards to migrating to the cloud, say we have a specific workload or set of workloads and we want to evaluate the cost of running that workload on our own private cloud, vs. VMware Cloud on AWS, vs. any number of public clouds (AWS, Azure, Google Cloud). With the new vRealize Operations cloud migration planning feature, we will be able compare the exact cost impact across all of our options (including a custom “any cloud provider” rate card option).

In regards to the new (HCI) Hyper-Converged Infrastructure modeling, we won't be covering it in this particular lesson. Instead, we will covered it in Module #6 - Enhancements to the Integrations with vSAN.


 

Menu - Home

 

  1. Click on the Home tab in the menu bar at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Optimize Capacity

 

  1. Click on the Plan text link in the Optimize Capacity column.

 

 

What-If Analysis

 

In vRealize Operations 7.5, there are numerous What-If planning enhancements. In previous versions, we had the ability to plan to add hosts and virtual machines. Now we have the ability to remove hosts and virtual machines. Also added is the ability to add (HCI) Hyper-Converged Infrastructure hosts which is covered in Module #6 - Enhancements to Integrations With vSAN. And finally, we have added the ability to plan the migration to cloud environments (VMware Cloud on AWS, Azure, Google Cloud Platform and various Cloud Providers).

In this lesson, we will look at the ability to remove hosts, remove virtual machines and migrate to new cloud providers.

 

 

Remove VMs

 

The first added feature we will look at is the impact of removing virtual machines from our infrastructure. We will go through the process and save the plan itself.

  1. Click on the REMOVE VMS text link in the Workload Planning box.

 

 

Remove Workload - Name

 

  1. Type Remove VM into the SCENARIO NAME text field.
  2. Click on the Select datacenter arrow next to LOCATION to expand its drop-down menu.
  3. Click on Production to select it as the datacenter location.

 

 

Remove Workload - Cluster

 

  1. Leave the default cluster of Production_Central that is automatically selected.

 

 

Remove Workload - Import

 

At this point in the configuration, we have the option to manually configure everything or import the specific virtual machine(s). For this lab purpose, lets pick the import from existing VM option.

  1. Click on the radius button next to Import from existing VM.
  2. then click on the SELECT VMS button.

 

 

Remove Workload - Select Virtual Machine(s)

 

Since we are not actually removing any virtual machines in this lab environment, we will just select the first virtual machine in the list for example purposes. However, do notice that we can select multiple virtual machines if we wanted to.

  1. Click on the arrow to the right of the first virtual machine in the list accounting-app-913747082 (sc2dc02 > Production_Central) to add it to the right as the one virtual machine to remove.
  2. Then click on the OK button.

 

 

Scroll Bar

 

  1. Drag the scroll bar all the way to the bottom of the user interface.

 

 

Remove Workload - Run Scenario

 

Keep in mind that the date in the screen capture is going to be different than the current date in which we are going through this lab. Because of this, we will just select a date one month from the current day we are doing this lab.

  1. Click on the calendar icon and change the date to (1) month from today's date (i.e. 7/18/19 for the screen capture).
  2. Click on the RUN SCENARIO button to run this scenario.

 

 

Remove Workload - Scenario Results

 

  1. We see the information related to the resources we selected to be removed in this particular example.
  2. Here it tells us the affect of removing the particular virtual machine we selected. It tells us how many days until we run out of resources and how much money we will save monthly. Then it goes into more details by telling us how we will regain the individual resources (CPU, Memory and Disk Space).

IMPORTANT NOTE:  Just a reminder, we are in the (HVM) Historical View Mode instance of vRealize Operations. So this is a snapshot of the historical view of one of our environments. Because of this, when we run this scenario to remove virtual machines, it reflects the cost savings of removing the virtual machine. However, as we see, the number of days has not changed. Again, this is because of it being in historical view. If this was a live environment, then we would see the number of days until we run out of resources increase.

 

 

Remove Workload - Scroll Bar

 

  1. Drag the scroll bar all the way to the bottom of the user interface.

 

 

Remove Workload - Timeline

 

  1. Hover your mouse over the intersecting lines to see the associated information in the pop-ups. Notice there is a pop-up window for each individual intersecting line on the graph. Feel free to hover over each of the intersecting lines.
  2. Here we have the option to look at the individual time graphs to see when we will run out of CPU, Memory or Disk Space. Fell free to click on the Memory and Disk Space tabs to see their associated time graphs.

 

 

Remove Workload - Save

 

As we mentioned previously, we will save the plan now so it will show up in the Saved Scenarios tab.

  1. Drag the scroll bar all the way up to the top of the page.
  2. Click on the SAVE button to save this scenario.

 

 

Remove Workload - Verify Saved

 

After clicking the SAVE button, we should see this reflecting that saving the scenario was successful.

NOTE:  If we click Save at the top, we will get the "Scenario was successfully saved" message, but only in the Run Scenario section. If we click Save on the edit screen, we will not get the messaget.

 

 

Remove Workload - Exit

 

  1. To close the Run Scenario dialog, click the X icon to exit out of this scenario.

 

 

Remove Host

 

The next added feature we will look at is the ability to remove host(s) from our infrastructure. We will go through the process and save the plan itself.

  1. Click on REMOVE HOSTS text link inside the Physical Infrastructure Planning box.

 

 

Remove Host - Name

 

  1. Type Remove Host into the Scenario Name text field to name the scenario.
  2. Click on the arrow next to Location to expand the drop-down list of locations.
  3. Click on the Production location.
  4. Keep the default selection of the Production_Central location.

 

 

Remove Host - Select Server

 

  1. Click on the SELECT SERVER button under Server type.

 

 

Remove Host - Select Server Type

 

  1. Click on the only host type in the list to remove it as a part of this scenario.
  2. Click on the OK button.

 

 

Remove Host - Server Details

 

  1. We see here is the information on the particular host type that we selected to include the processor speed and type, sockets, cores, RAM, manufacturer date and cost.
  2. Here is where we can select the number of host(s) we would want to remove.

 

 

Remove Host - Run Scenario

 

Keep in mind that the date in the screen capture is going to be different than the current date in which we are going through this lab. Because of this, we will just select a date one month from the current day we are doing this lab.

  1. Click on the calendar icon and change the date to (3) months from today's date (i.e. 9/18/19 for the screen capture).
  2. Click on the RUN SCENARIO button to run the scenario.

 

 

Remove Host - Remove Capacity

 

Just like when we previously removed a virtual machine, here we have the same scenario output for removing a host. The only exception is since the host has no local storage, it doesn't show any storage savings obviously. Feel free to scroll down and look at the timeline graph at the bottom of the page if you like.

 

 

Remove Host - Save and Exit

 

  1. Scroll to the top of the page if not already there and click on the SAVE button to save the scenario.
  2. Click on the X icon to exit the scenario.

 

 

Migrate To Cloud

 

Now lets take a look at look at some of the additional options to migrate to a public cloud provider. Prior to version vRealize Operations 7.5, we were able to do migrations to the cloud, but only to (AWS) Amazon Web Services and VMware Cloud on AWS. So lets take a look at what new migration to the cloud options are available now.

IMPORTANT NOTE: With this being a lab environment, we won't actually be able to migrate anything to a cloud provider since we do not have a connection to the internet. However, we will go through the process and save the plan itself.

  1. Click on the PLAN MIGRATION text link in the Migration Planning box on the Quick Start dashboard.

 

 

Migrate To Cloud - IBM Cloud

 

  1. The first of the new cloud providers that we can migrate to is IBM Cloud.
  2. Click on the arrow on the far right side of the providers list to see the remaining ones.

 

 

Migrate To Cloud - VCPP and Microsoft Azure

 

  1. The next two new cloud providers are the VCPP Providers and Microsoft Azure.

For those not familiar with it, the (VCPP) VMware Cloud Provider Program are VMware managed cloud providers that are running the VMware stack and offering a public cloud environment and experience to customers much like the large ones like AWS, Azure, and Google. Look for the VMware Cloud Verified logo to find cloud providers committed to driving your organization's digital transformation by enabling you to seamlessly run, manage, connect and secure applications across private and public clouds in a common operating environment. The VMware Cloud Verified logo provides assurance that the VMware Cloud Provider Program's services are compatible with the VMware Cloud Infrastructure. Find verified cloud providers here.

 

 

Migrate To Cloud - Google Cloud

 

  1. The final new provider is Google Cloud in which we can migrate workloads to.

As we see, we now have numerous options to be able to migrate workloads to all the most popular cloud providers out there!

 

 

Migrate To Cloud - Find AWS

 

  1. Click on the left-hand arrow on the left side of the SELECT CLOUDS section until we can see AWS box.

 

 

Migrate To Cloud - AWS Region

 

  1. Type Migrate to AWS into the SCENARIO NAME text field to name the migration scenario.
  2. Click on the arrow next to Select Region inside the AWS box.
  3. Click on the US East North Virginia (us-east-1) region.

 

 

Add Cloud Providers

 

In vRealize Operations 7.5, we have also added the ability to add new cloud providers and their associated costs. Although we won't click on this now, If we were to click on the + ADD CLOUD PROVIDERS, it would take us directly to Administration Tab > Configuration > Cost Settings > Cloud Providers tab. We will take a look at this in the next lesson which is Set Cost Drivers.

 

 

Migrate To Cloud - Import

 

  1. Click on the radius button next to import from existing VM.
  2. Then click on the SELECT VMS button.

 

 

Migrate To Cloud - Select VMs

 

We are going to pretend that we are going to migrate our companies accounting application which consists of a database, application and web server. We see the first three virtual machines in the list are those three virtual machines that make up the account application.

  1. Click on the arrow to the right of the first three virtual machines with their names starting with "accounting...".
  2. Verify that all three accounting virtual machines are listed in the right-hand column now.
  3. Click on the OK button.

 

 

Migrate To Cloud - Scroll Bar

 

  1. Drag the scroll bar all the way to the bottom of the user interface.

 

 

Migrate To Cloud - Run Scenario

 

  1. We see that all three accounting virtual machines have been added to this scenario.
  2. Click on the RUN SCENARIO button to run this scenario.

 

 

Migrate To Cloud - Cost Comparison

 

  1. We see the cost comparison between running the three accounting virtual machines on our own private cloud compared to running them in AWS. In the case of the accounting application, it is much cheaper to run them in AWS than it is in our private cloud. So the accounting application is a great candidate to run in AWS instead and in return save the company a lot of money monthly/annually.

NOTE: vRealize Operations gets its costs from the public "retail" price sheets for each provider. The prices seen here also DO NOT include any potential discounts that a customer can get through partners or the cloud providers themselves. It is also a good idea to regularly check to see if the cloud provider's rates have changed. If so, we can download the providers latest rate sheet and recalculate the pricing in vRealize Operations 7.5.

 

 

Migrate To Cloud - Servers

 

  1. Due to the size of the accounting servers we selected to migrate, the migration tool automatically selected the appropriate size of the virtual machine that best matches our needs while being cost effective. So the "t2 small" virtual machines were selected for the accounting application servers as the best and most cost effective virtual machine size for them in AWS.

NOTE:  We may need to scroll down to see all three servers in the scenario.

 

 

Migrate To Cloud - Save

 

  1. Click on the SAVE text link to save this scenario for a later time.

 

 

Migrate To Cloud - Verify Saved

 

After clicking the SAVE button, we should see this reflecting that saving the scenario was successful.

 

 

Migrate To Cloud - Exit

 

  1. Click on the X icon to close the scenario.

 

 

Stack Scenarios - Select

 

Returning to vRealize Operations 7.5 is the ability to stack saved scenarios. This allows us to see the affect of multiple scenarios at once which can be very useful!

  1. Click on the Saved Scenarios tab to view all the saved scenarios.
  2. Click on three check boxes for the Remove VM and Remove Host scenarios.
  3. Then click on the RUN SCENARIOS button to run all three simultaneously.

NOTE:  The order of the scenarios may be different in the lab environment.

 

 

Stack Scenarios - Timeline

 

  1. In this Scenario Timeline, we see when each of the scenarios are implemented in a staggered manner based off the dates we gave them.
  2. Click on the RUN SCENARIO button.

NOTE:  The bar graph make look slightly different in the lab environment than what is in the screen capture.

 

 

Stack Scenarios - Time Graph

 

  1. We see that by running both of these scenarios, it will cause us to run out of resources in (45) days instead of the original (160) days. By running these scenarios, we see that it would not be a good idea to remove the host since it will put us dangerously low on resources within the (45) days.
  2. We see that by removing the resources on June 29th we have several intersecting points. If we hover the mouse over each of these intersecting points, a pop-up window with additional information will show up.
  3. By default, the graph is on the timeline for CPU. Feel free to click on the Memory and Disk Space tabs to see how the timeline looks. (we may need to scroll down to see the entire graph)

NOTE:  The Time Remaining, Bar Graph and associated data may look slightly different in the lab environment than what is in the screen capture.

 

 

Stack Scenarios - Exit

 

  1. Drag the scroll bar to the top of the user interface until we can see the EDIT button.
  2. Click on the X to exit out of the stacked scenario.

 

 

Hyperconverged Infrastructure Modeling

 

Just a reminder regarding the new (HCI) Hyperconverged Infrastructure planning modeling, we will covered it in Module #6 - Enhancements to the Integrations with vSAN. Since it is directly related to the integrations with (vSAN) Virtual SAN, we will cover it in that module instead of this one.

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on New Planning (What-If) Modeling!

In this lesson, we learned how we have added additional capabilities such as removing virtual machines, removing hosts and also added more cloud providers that we can migrate to. We created scenarios for removing a virtual machine as well as removing a host. Then we looked at the new cloud providers and ran through migrating to AWS. Finally, we showed how we can stack saved scenarios to see what would happen to our environment if we actually proceeded with those scenario actions.

Up next is the lesson which covers Setting Cost Drivers.

 

Set Cost Drivers


In this lesson, we will be discussing the ability to set the cost drivers in vRealize Operations 7.5. Some companies use a charge back method to charge the cost of associated infrastructure costs for the associated business unit, department, etc. The ability to set specific cost drivers is very helpful for IT departments to get a handle on their costs associated to the various components of their infrastructure.

vRealize Operations uses industry standard costs by default for its calculations. However, the industry standard may not be close to a companies actual costs. For example the industry standard for a specific server is $10,000, a company may customize its server build and cost them maybe $18,000. We see in this example, the costs could be way off. So in vRealize Operations 7.5, we allow our customers to manually adjust their costs for anything from man hours, power, hardware, software licensing, etc, etc. By setting these costs in vRealize Operations, a company can get a very accurate cost breakout for the various components of their infrastructure.

Cost Drivers are the aspect that contributes to the expense of your business operations. Cost drivers provide a link between a pool of costs. To provide a granular cost visibility and to track your expenses of virtual machines accurately in a private cloud, vRealize Operations has identified eight key cost drivers. You can see the total projected expense on your private cloud accounts for the current month and the trend of cost over time.

We can now set a total cost for the License, Labor, Network, Maintenance, and Facilities cost drivers in vRealize Operations:

To see the detailed list of Expense Types, see the below link:

https://docs.vmware.com/en/vRealize-Operations-Manager/7.5/com.vmware.vcom.core.doc/GUID-9D162B8A-FBF8-4713-901C-6E3A1A5B7AEA.html


 

Administration Tab

 

  1. Click on Administration tab in the Menu bar at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Navigation - Cost Settings

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to Configuration in the Navigation Pane on the left-hand side of the user interface to expand its menu.
  2. Click on Cost Settings under the Configuration drop-down menu.

 

 

Cost Settings - Menu

 

We see that there are (4) main tabs for cost settings in the Content Pane on the right-hand side of the user interface.

  • Cost Drivers - This is where we can actually set costs for various objects such as servers, licensing, storage, etc.
  • Cluster Cost - Shows us the various associated costs for all clusters in our environment.
  • Cloud Providers - We are able to download the latest public cloud provider rate sheets to ensure our costs are accurate.
  • Cost Calculation Status -  We are able to run the calculations to update our costs after we have manually made cost changes or downloaded a new provider rate sheet. This should be ran after any cost changes are made.

 

 

Cost Settings - Settings

 

  1. Click on the Settings (gear) icon next to Cost Settings to go into the Financial Accounting Model settings.

 

 

Cost Settings - Financial Accounting Model

 

Although this is not new in vRealize Operations 7.5, it is an important that we set this to the appropriate number of depreciation years so that our costs will reflect appropriately. Here we have the ability to set the number of depreciation years for an organization. Most of them typically show depreciation over a three or five year period. For our purposes in the lab environment, we will set it to three years. Companies will take depreciation in various ways, we see here that we can take it either in a straight line or take the maximum of Double or Straight. For our purposes of the lab, we will just use the straight line.

  1. Click the down-arrow until the Depreciation years reaches (3).
  2. Click on the SAVE button.

 

 

Cost Settings -  Cost Drivers

 

  1. Make sure we are on the Cost Drivers tab, if not, click on the Cost Drivers tab.

 

 

Cost Settings -  Server Hardware : Traditional

 

We see that there is a long list of optional costs that we can modify if we choose to. They are items such as hardware, software, maintenance, labor, facilities, etc. For the sake of this lab example, we will just modify the Server Hardware: Traditional costs.

  1. Click on the Server Hardware : Traditional text link under the Cost Drivers menu.

 

 

Cost Settings -  Total Monthly Costs

 

  1. We see the current total monthly cost for traditional server hardware is $20.12K.
  2. Notice there are (40) of these servers for a total current value of $18.67K for the monthly cost.
  3. Select the drop-down arrow next to the third from the top in the list that totals equal to $18.67K.

NOTE:  The costs here are shown in US$, but these can be modified in the Management  Global Settings > Currency section which is not covered in this lab.

 

 

Cost Settings -  Select Servers

 

  1. Drag the scroll bar down until we can see the everything associated to these servers.
  2. Then click on Select Server(s) for customization text link under the Number of Servers column.

 

 

Server Customization - Select Microsoft Servers

 

  1. Click on the check boxes next to the first (10) hosts in the list to select them.
  2. Then drag the scroll bar all the way to the bottom of the pop-up window.

 

 

Server Customization - OK

 

  1. Click on the OK button to save the selected servers.

 

 

Server Customization - Price Change

 

Now that we have selected the specific servers, we will now change some of the options such as Purchase Type and the Cost of the servers. Although we can change the Purchase Date as well, we will not be changing it for the purposes of this lab lesson.

  1. Type 20000.00 into the Cost Per Server column to change the cost of the server. Be sure to click off of the text box after entering the new server cost.
  2. We see that for those (10) servers we selected, the total now reflects $200.0K.
  3. Click on the SAVE button to save the changes we have made.

 

 

Cost Drivers - Saved

 

  1. We now see the total monthly cost for those servers have increased to $19.56K from the original $18.67K a month.
  2. We also see the total cost at the top has changed to $21.01K now from its original $20.12K.

 

 

Cluster Cost Menu

 

  1. Click on the Cluster Cost tab in the Cost Setting's Menu.

 

 

Cluster Cost - Utilization Options

 

Review the cluster related costing information for this environment to get a better understanding of what information is available.

  1. Click on the Change text link under the Cluster Costs tab.

 

 

Cluster Cost - Calculation Methods

 

As we see, there are three options to calculate cluster costs. The default is Expected Utilization set by Actual Utilization. We can also set it to Expected Utilization set across all clusters and Expected Utilization set per cluster. For the purposes of this lab, we will keep the default setting.

  1. Click on the CANCEL button to ensure we keep the default setting.

 

 

Cloud Providers Tab

 

  1. Click on the Cloud Providers tab under Cost Settings.

 

 

Cloud Providers - Options

 

  1. We see that we have the options to Add, Edit, Delete, and Refresh the cloud providers information.

We also have the option to download the latest Pricing Sheets for each of the various cloud providers by click on the appropriate green arrow. DO NOT CLICK ON THE ARROWS! This lab environment is not connected to the internet and can't download the pricing sheets.

  1. Click on AWS Amazon Web Service.

 

 

Cloud Providers - AWS

 

  1. Click on the Edit (pencil icon) button.

 

 

 

In the first page of the pop-up window, we have the option to Upload Logo if we choose. For the purposes of this lesson, we will not be uploading a logo.

  1. Click on the NEXT button to go to the next screen.

 

 

AWS - Upload Rate Card

 

In this screen, we can upload a Rate Card. This would be useful if we were connected to a provider that is providing our company with a managed or unmanaged cloud environment. They could provide us their rate card and upload it so we have that providers exact costs for accurate costing within vRealize Operations.  After you upload the rate card, you can then click on the VALIDATE button to ensure that rate card is imported properly.

For the purposes of this lab, we will not be uploading a rate card.

  1. Click on the CANCEL button to ensure we don't make any potential changes.

 

 

Cost Settings - Cost Calculations Menu

 

  1. Click on the Cost Calculation Status under the Cost Settings tab.

 

 

Cost Calculations Status

 

As we see, the cost calculation was completed successfully on a previous date. For the purposes of this lesson, we will NOT run the calculation process to minimize the workload on the lab environment since it has minimal resources.

We would typically run this process after making any cost changes. For example, if we had downloaded a new rate card for AWS like we just looked at in the previous steps. Also, if we had made any manual costing changes under the Cost Drivers tab, we would want to run this to ensure all costs are reflecting the updated costs.

NOTE: The associated dates of the last time this was ran will be most likely different in the lab environment than what is in this screen capture.

In this lesson, we learned how we have the options to customize the various cost drivers that affect our physical and virtual infrastructure costs. Again, we can just use the industry standard costs that come out of the box in vRealize Operations 7.5. However, to get a more accurate account of your costs, it is recommended that you input your "actual" real costs into the cost drivers. That way we can get very accurate costing information. This is especially useful for those companies that are charging back their costs to their various business units or departments.

 

Conclusion


In this module, we discussed numerous topics around the Enhancements in Capacity and Costing Optimization. We started off discussing how we now can reclaim resources from Orphaned VMDK's in our environment. Then we went through the Enhanced Capacity Tab for Clusters and Datastore Clusters and looked at how we can view the data based on Demand as well as Allocation. We then looked at the existing as well as created our own Custom Profile for Capacity Remaining. We returned to the Reclaim dashboard and took a closer look at the data specifically around the Allocation Based model rather than the default Demand-based model.

Next, we took a good look at the various new Planning (What-If) models we have such as adding hosts and virtual machines, as well as the ability to migrate workloads to numerous new cloud providers to include adding our own customized cloud provider. Lastly, we looked at the ability to Set Cost Drivers for numerous items such as hardware, software, power, FTEs, etc. We made some changes to our server hardware costs to see that our total monthly costs changed appropriately.

Up next is Module #4 covering Enhancements in Troubleshooting and Remediation (45 minutes).


 

You've finished Module 3!

If you are looking for additional information on (vROPs) vRealize Operations 7.5 enhancements in Capacity and Costing Optimization, try one of these:

If you are looking for additional information on vRealize Operations, you can start here: https://www.vmware.com/products/vrealize-suite.html

You may proceed to the next module by advancing to the next page. If you want to jump to a particular module, follow one of the links below.

 

 

How to End Lab

 

Or if you want to end your lab,

  1. Click on the END button at the top of the page.

 

Module 4 - Enhancements in Troubleshooting and Remediation (45 minutes)

Introduction


This lab module provides a brief overview of the following topics:

  1. Agent Install and Management for vROPs or Wavefront
  2. Full Stack Visibility
  3. Custom Properties in the (UI) User Interface
  4. Override Dashboard Times for Dashboards
  5. New Super Metric Editor & Metric History
  6. Metric Correlation in Metric Charts
  7. Groupings in List Views Based on Relationships
  8. New Alert Groupings for (1 & 4 Hours)
  9. ServiceNow Integration
  10. Updates to the vRO Management Pack  

Log in to the vRealize Operations Live Instance


This lab environment is running two different instances of vRealize Operations and one instance of vRealize Log Insight. We have the different vRealize Operations instances in order to be able to work through different use cases that have unique requirements. The lab instances are as follows:

  • Live Instance: Connected to the small running vSphere environment in the lab. There isn't a large inventory of objects in this instance but it allows us to interact with vCenter Server.
  • Historical View Mode (HVM) Instance: Running a time loop of data that was captured in the past. This instance has a much larger inventory of objects but since it is not currently connected to a vCenter Server, we cannot perform any actions here.

In this lesson we will be using the live Instance of vRealize Operations.

If you are already logged into the live (not historical) instance of vRealize Operations, click here to skip ahead.


 

Open the Chrome Browser from Windows Quick Launch Task Bar

 

If your browser isn't already open, launch Google Chrome

  1. Click the Chrome icon on the Windows Quick Launch Task Bar

 

 

Open the vRealize Operations - Live Instance Tab

 

The browser home page has links to the different instances of vRealize Operations that are running in the lab.

  1. Click the vRealize Operations - Live Instance link to open the vRealize Operations UI in a new browser tab

 

 

Log in to vRealize Operations

 

vRealize Operations is integrated with VMware Identity Manager which we will use for user authentication in this lab.

VMware Identity Manager should be pre-selected as the identity source. However, if it is not you will choose it.

  1. Click the drop-down arrow
  2. Select VMware Identity Manager
  3. Click REDIRECT to take you to the authentication page

 

 

 

VMware Identity Manager Login

 

For this vRealize Operations instance, the lab uses VMware Idenity Manager as the authentication provider. This allows for seamless integration with vRealize Log Insight.

The user and password information should already be filled in. However, if needed type them in.

username: holuser

password: VMware1!

  1. Click Sign in

 

Agent Installation and Management for vROps or Wavefront 


In this lesson, we will learn about the newly added feature Application Monitoring!

One of the most significant NEW features that vRealize Operations 7.5 will bring into play is native application and OS monitoring! That’s right – vRealize Operations 7.5 will provide full visibility from apps-to-infrastructure. This is a HUGE new set of capabilities that have gone into the product to give complete observability into your entire environment and troubleshoot performance issues even faster and more seamlessly than ever before. vRealize Operations 7.5 will automatically discover supported services running in your environment and allow you to choose whether you want vRealize Operations to monitor those applications directly, or just pull those metrics straight into Wavefront by VMware. Both Wavefront and vRealize Operations are now using Telegraf agents for metric collection and reporting.

Wavefront provides metrics-driven analytics at massive scale, so we can get the most out of our cloud-native applications. If you would like to learn more about Wavefront, click here.

If you use or have ever used Endpoint Operations, you know the visibility into the health and availability of the applications running in your SDDC is invaluable. So what if we are using Endpoint Operations today? If we already are using it, we can still try out the new Application Monitoring capability without disruption our current monitoring with Endpoint Operations. They can both be used together in the same vRealize Operations 7.5 cluster (just not on the same virtual machine)So be sure not to have the old Endpoint Operations agent AND the new Telegraf agent on the same virtual machine, they cannot be together on a single virtual machine!

An additional great benefit of the new application monitoring is that it also offers full lifecycle management of agents. This includes the deployment, upgrade, configuration and even uninstall of the agent. Never with vRealize Operations has it been easier to get started with application monitoring than with vRealize Operations 7.5.


 

Home

 

NOTE:  Make sure we are in the Live instance of vRealize Operations 7.5 before continuing to the next step.

  1. Let's make sure we are on the Home tab. Click on the Home tab at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Monitor Applications

 

  1. Click on Monitor Applications in the Navigation Pane on the left side of the user interface.

 

 

Supported Operating Systems and Services

 

In vRealize Operations 7.5, the native Application Monitoring will provide support for Windows and Linux virtual machines, and (17) popular packaged applications. Additionally, remote monitoring is available for HTTP, ICMP, TCP and UDP. Here we can review the full list of supported operating systems and services that can be monitored. Feel free to scroll down to the bottom of the page to see the full list.

 

 

Configure Application Monitoring

 

  1. Click on the CONFIGURE APPLICATION MONITORING button in order to see where we can configure it.

 

 

Application Remote Collector

 

  1. We see that the application remote collector is already configured for us and is in a Healthy state which is reflected by the green check-mark.

 

 

Application Remote Collector - Interval

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to Advanced Settings in order to see what the interval is set to.
  2. We see that the default interval to collect metrics on all applications is set to 5 minutes.

 

 

Installation Process Overview

 

Here we have an overview of the entire installation process from start to finish to manage application monitoring agent. First we select the destination of either vRealize Operations or Wavefront. Next, we deploy the (ARC) Application Remote Collector which is a virtual appliance that can support up to (6500) virtual machines (in the “Large” deployment configuration). 

After deployment, simply register the ARC with vRealize Operations and select the vCenter servers hosting virtual machines with applications that we would like to monitor. At that point, we are ready to start deploying the Telegraf agent to the virtual machines. Once the Telegraf agent is deployed, a service discovery runs to find any of the supported applications running on the virtual machines. We can then select the applications we wish to monitor and provide some configuration details to make it easier to identify applications at a later time.

 

 

Inventory

 

  1. Click on Inventory under Solutions in the Navigation Pane on the left side of the user interface.

 

 

Managed Agents

 

  1. Click on the Managed Agents tab in the Content Pane to the right side of the user interface.

We now see the list of virtual machines in our environment. We also can see if the Telegraf agent is installed on the virtual machine, was the install successful and the discovered service that is on it.

 

 

Managed Objects (continued)

 

Now we can see the additional columns of information such as Last operation status, agent version, and collection state and status. Drag the scroll bar to the right at the bottom of the user interface to see the rest of the columns and the associated information.

 

 

Lifecycle Management

 

Under the Manage Agents tab, we have the ability to do full lifecycle management of the Telegraf agent on the virtual machines. This includes install, uninstall, update, start, stop and do remote checks. This makes managing the agent very easy across our entire environment.

  1. If need be, scroll to the left and then click on the app-01a virtual machine in the list to select it.

Now that we selected a virtual machine, we see that some of the icons are no longer grayed out and can be accessed to manage the agent on the virtual machine.

  1. Hover the mouse pointer over the down arrow (install) icon, we see that we can install the Telegraf agent to a virtual machine.
  2. Hover the mouse pointer over the X (uninstall) icon, we see that we can uninstall the Telegraf agent from a virtual machine.
  3. Hover the mouse pointer over the box with an arrow (update) icon, we see that we can update the Telegraf agent on a virtual machine with it on it already.

 

 

Lifecycle Management (continued)

 

  1. We see here we can Start and Stop the Telegraf agent if need be.
  2. Click on the Managed Service (colored bars) icon and click on the arrow to expand its menu options.
  3. Click on Remote Check to expand its menu options.
  4. We see here that we have (4) options for the Remote Check capability which include ICMP, UDP, TCP and HTTP.

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on Agent Installation and Management for vROPs or Wavefront!

In this lesson, we learned that one of the best additions to vRealize Operations 7.5 is the addition of native Application Monitoring. We also learned that it uses the Telegraf agent which is also used in our Wavefront solution. We then looked at the full lifecycle management capabilities of it which included the install, uninstall and update of the Telegraf agent as well as numerous other capabilities to lifecycle manage it.

Up next is the lesson which covers Full Stack Visibility using the new Advanced Object Relationship Widget which makes troubleshooting quicker and easier than ever before because of being able to see the applications relationships to all its associated objects.

 

Full Stack Visibility


In this lesson, we will discuss the Full Stack Visibility by using the Troubleshoot an Application dashboard.

In the last lesson, we discussed the install and management of the Telgraf agent which enabled us to monitor applications on our virtual machines. Once this step has been accomplished, it opens up the ability to get advanced relationship information for our stack to correlate across the full stack with extensible topology. It's a multi-level topology view from application to infrastructure with an overlay of active alerts based on events, logs, anomalies and metric threshold breaches.

We can quickly understand the upstream and downstream impact of health issues across the stack. The path exploration tool highlights all objects along a selected path increasing visibility during troubleshooting. This allows us to quickly find infrastructure issues that are causing poor application performance. This is very useful for administrators to prove what the "root cause" actually is for an issue.

We can also leverage out of the box inventory dashboards to browse through the environment or create custom application topology views using new widgets within custom dashboards. A simple but powerful feature of this is the ability to give user-defined application names to allow for easier troubleshooting.


 

Dashboards Tab

 

To set the stage, lets pretend that we are an administrator with a company and have received a Help desk ticket stating that numerous users of the application are complaining about the performing of it. We currently do not know what the root cause is, so we have to go digging to find out what is the actual cause of the issue. As it can happen in IT organizations, the different IT departments are pointing fingers at each other, but we want to get to the real root cause. In vRealize Operations 7.5 we now have the Advanced Relationship Topology view to assist us with this, so lets go look at it!

  1. Click on the Dashboards tab in the menu bar at the top of the user interface.

 

 

All Dashboards

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to All Dashboards at the top of the user interface.
  2. Check the box next to Performance Troubleshooting in the All Dashboards drop-down menu. This will add all the associated Troubleshooting dashboards to the Navigation Pane to be able to select each one of them.
  3. Click on Troubleshoot an Application in the Performance Troubleshooting drop-down menu.

 

 

Minimize

 

  1. Click the double arrow to minimize the Navigation Pane to provide more room for the dashboard view.

 

 

Applications

 

  1. Click on MySQL on db-01a in order to view the advanced relationship topology for this application.

 

 

Advanced Relationship Topology - Horizontal View

 

  1. We see that the default view is set to a horizontal view which may make it hard to see all the components of the Advanced relationship topology view.

 

 

Advanced Relationship Topology - Vertical View

 

Lets change the view from a horizontal one to a vertical view to make it easier to see all the components.

  1. Click on the Vertical icon so that we can see the entire topology better inside the current size of the view.

NOTE:  We may need to drag the components with the mouse a little to center them.

 

 

Application Topology

 

We see here the relationship of all the objects for this application to include its Distributed Switch (VM-RegionA01-vD), vSphere Host (esx-01a.corp.local), the Virtual Machine (db-01a), Linux OS and MySQL database. This view makes it easy to see all the connected components of the application.

We will notice a status icon next to each of these components indicating general health of each element in the topology. Let’s explore that further on the next page.

 

 

db-01a Warning

 

  1. Click on the db-01a virtual machine to bring up the pop-up information window. (we can also just hover the mouse pointer over it to have the information pop-up come up as well)
  2. We see that db-01a has a warning symbol (yellow triangle) next to Health.

For this application topology, this health indicator tells us that the virtual machine is the root cause of the performance issue. We now also know it is not a distributed switch (network), host, Linux OS or MsSQL (database) issue. So as we see, the topology view has very quickly allowed us to get to the root cause which is the virtual machine and can dispel any other possibilities.

 

 

Scroll Bar

 

  1. Drag the right-most scroll bar in the user interface down to the bottom of the screen.

 

 

Alerts - Expand

 

  1. Hover the mouse over the right-hand corner of the Alerts bar until we see the menu options, then click on the double-arrow to expand the alerts view.

 

 

Alerts

 

NOTE:  Just a reminder, the scenario we have been working through is just made up, but this alert "could" be a real world cause of the issue.

  1. Click on the arrow next to yellow warning symbol to expand it.
  2. We see that db-01a has been running on snapshots for more than two days. So we have verified it was an issue with the virtual machine, more specifically the fact it is running on a snapshot which can cause performance issues.  

 

 

Scroll Bar

 

  1. Drag the scroll bar down to the bottom of the screen.

 

 

Metrics

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to Snapshot to expand the snapshot menu.
  2. Double-click on Disk Space Snapshot Space (GB) to select it.

 

 

Disk Space Snapshot Space (GB)

 

  1. Here we see the graph for Disk Space Snapshot Space (GB).

NOTE: In a real world situation where the snapshot was causing performance issues, we would see it in the graph and it would be obvious. However, since the scenario was for lab purposes only, we don't actually see an issue in the graph.

 

 

Maximize

 

Now that we are done with this lesson, lets return the navigation pane back to the maximized position.

  1. Click the double arrow to minimize the Navigation Pane to provide more room for the dashboard view.

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on Full Stack Visibility!

In this lesson, we learned that vRealize Operations 7.5 now has the Advanced Relationship Topology view which is extremely useful for looking at all the related components connected to an application. This greatly assists in getting to the root cause of an issue. We had a made up issue and troubleshot it using the new topology view and discovered it was a snapshot on the virtual machine causing the issue.

Up next is the lesson which covers Custom Properties in the (UI) User Interface.

 

Custom Properties in the (UI) User Interface


In this lesson, we will discuss the ability to set and create custom properties to help identify vCenter objects to make it easier for virtual administrators to identify them.

We have the choice to set a custom property as either a "static" or "dynamic" property. A static property is where we set it manually, we will create a "static" custom property called "VM Owner" for the Win-2016 virtual machine so administrators can quickly and easily see who is the owner of a virtual machine.

A "dynamic" property is one that when adding new virtual machines to an environment, it will have that custom property automatically added to it.  


 

Administration Tab

 

  1. Click on the Administration tab in the menu bar at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Inventory

 

  1. Click on Inventory in the Navigation Pane on the left side of the user interface.

 

 

Object Types

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to Object Types in the Inventory view to expand its drop-down menu.
  2. Drag the scroll bar all the way down until you see Virtual Machine (8) in the list.

 

 

Virtual Machine

 

We want to again create a static property called "VM Owner" for a virtual machine, so we need to find the virtual machine object in the list of objects.

  1. Click on Virtual Machine (8) from the Object Types drop-down menu.

NOTE:  There could be (9) virtual machines listed in the lab environment instead of (8).

 

 

Add/Edit Custom Property

 

As a reminder, we are wanting to add the "VM Owner" property to the Win-2016 virtual machine.

  1. Click on the Win-2016 virtual machine in the list of objects.
  2. Click on the Add/Edit Custom Property (notepad with pencil) icon in the tool bar.

 

 

Define Custom Property

 

  1. Type VM Owner in the Property Name text field.
  2. We are going to leave the default setting of a String for the Type, however the other options is a Numeric value.
  3. Type John Smith in for the Value text field as he is our ficticious owner of the Win-2016 virtual machine.
  4. Click on the check box acknowledging you understand that once created, the custom property name and type can't be changed.
  5. Then click on the SAVE button to save this custom property.

NOTE:  As the warning mentioned in step #4, once we create a custom property, we are unable to change the "name" or "type" of property. However, we can change the "values" for the custom property at a later if we desire.

 

 

 

  1. Click on the Search icon in the top right corner of the user interface.

 

 

Search - win-2016

 

  1. Type win-2016 into the search text field so we can search for this specific virtual machine.
  2. Then click on the Win-2016 text link for the virtual machine to go to its details page.

 

 

All Objects - Win-2016

 

We see that it takes us into the Environment Tab > All Objects > Win-2016 Summary dashboard.

  1. Click on the All Metrics tab in the Win-2016 Content Pane.

 

 

Minimize Topology View

 

If the Advanced Topology Relationship view is already minimized, we can skip this step. Otherwise, we will want to complete this step.

  1. Click on the double arrow to minimize the Advanced Topology Relationship view.

 

 

Properties

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to All Properties to expand its drop-down menu.
  2. Click on the arrow next to Custom Property to expand its drop-down menu.

We see that there is the VM Owner object under Custom Properties because we created it in the previous steps of this lesson. This VM Owner object would not be listed here if we had not created the particular custom property for the Win-2016 virtual machine.

  1. Double-click on VM Owner to bring up the associated information in the view to the right.

 

 

Verify Custom Property

 

  1. We see here that John Smith shows as the owner of the Win-2016 virtual machine and is reflected here by the Last Value title.

 

 

Environment Tab

 

We are now going to create a "dynamic" custom group, whereas previously we created a "static" custom group. In this example, we want to create a dynamic group that will add any new Windows 2016 server virtual machine to this dynamic group. Then if it gets upgraded to a newer version of the operating system, it will get classified as a Non-Windows 2016 Server.

  1. Click on the Environment tab in the menu bar at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Custom Groups

 

  1. Click on Custom Groups in the Groups and Applications drop-down menu.

 

 

New Custom Group

 

  1. Click on the New Custom Group (green plus sign) icon.

 

 

New Group

 

  1. Type Windows 2016 Server into the Name text field.
  2. Click the arrow next to Group Type and select Department from the drop-down menu.
  3. Click the arrow next to Policy and select Hands On Lab Policy from the drop-down menu.
  4. Click on the check box next to Keep group membership up to date.

NOTE:  Notice the yellow banner that states that custom group membership is updated every 20 minutes. This is good to keep in mind while working with custom groups in real-world production situations.

 

 

Define Membership Criteria

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to All to expand its drop-down menu.
  2. Click on the arrow next to vCenter Adapter to expand its drop-down menu.

 

 

Virtual Machine

 

  1. Drag the scroll bar down until you see Virtual Machine in the list.
  2. Click on Virtual Machine to select it.

 

 

Properties

 

  1. Click on the arrow and select Properties.

 

 

Guest Operating System

 

  1. Click inside the Pick a Property text field.
  2. Type Guest Operating into the Name text field and hit the ENTER key on the keyboard.
  3. We see that it finds Guest Operating System in the list, click the arrow next to Guest Operating System to expand its menu.
  4. Double-click on Guest OS Full Name to select it from the drop-down menu.

 

 

Contains

 

  1. Click on the arrow to expand its drop-down menu for it.
  2. Click on contains to select it from the drop-down menu.

 

 

Property Value

 

  1. Click inside the Property Value text field and a drop-down menu will appear. (It may take a few seconds for the drop-down list of options to show)
  2. Click on Microsoft Windows Server 2016 (64-bit) from the drop-down menu.

 

 

Assign Custom Properties - Expand

 

  1. Click on the double arrow on the right side of the Assign custom properties bar to expand that section.

 

 

Scroll Bar

 

  1. Drag the scroll bar all the way to the bottom of the pop-up window.

 

 

Assign Custom Properties

 

  1. Type Windows 2016 Server into the Property Name text field.
  2. Type Windows 2016 Server into the Value text field.
  3. Type Non-Windows 2016 Server into the Reset Value text field, this will reclassify it as a Non-Windows 2016 Server.

We discussed this example earlier in this lesson in the event a virtual machine gets upgraded to a newer version in the future. At that point it will technically no longer be a Windows 2016 server, so it would have to be removed from that custom group and would then be reclassified as the Non-Windows 2016 Server. With this classification, we will know it was once a Windows 2016 server and the operating system was upgraded at some point in time.

 

 

Save Custom Property

 

  1. Drag the scroll bar all the way to the bottom of the user interface.
  2. Click on the check box acknowledging you understand that once created, the custom property name and type can't be changed.
  3. Then click on the OK button to save this custom dynamic property.

NOTE:  As the warning mentioned in step #2, once we create a custom property, we are unable to change the "name" or "type" of property. However, we can change the "values" for the custom property. Also, keep in mind that in this lab environment, there is only (1) Windows virtual machine.

 

 

Confirm Creation of Dynamic Custom Group

 

NOTE:  Our new custom dynamic group will be listed in a different order than what we see in the screen capture.

  1. We see here that under Custom Groups, we now have the Windows 2016 Server custom dynamic group that we just created. (the new dynamic custom group may be listed lower in the list)

Now whenever we would add any additional Windows 2016 servers to our environment, it will dynamically add those virtual machines to the custom group. And it does it without requiring a virtual administrator to manually add each new one to the dynamic custom group. This ultimately saves them a ton of time and ensures that all the Windows 2016 virtual machines are tagged appropriately.

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on Custom Properties in the (UI) User Interface!

In this lesson, we learned that there are static and dynamic custom properties that can be created. We first started off creating a static custom group to identify virtual machines with Windows 2016 server on them. Then we did the same thing except we created a "dynamic" custom group so that any additional virtual machines with the Windows 2016 operating system on them will get automatically assign the custom property.

Up next is the lesson which covers Override Dashboard Times for Dashboards.

 

Override Dashboard Times for Dashboards


In this lesson, we will discuss the new ability to override the dashboard times.

The benefit of being able to override the dashboard time is when we are troubleshooting an event that happened within a specific period of time. By adjusting the time of the dashboard, it helps narrow the focus of the data being presented to us.  


 

Dashboards

 

  1. Click on the Dashboards tab in the menu bar at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Troubleshoot a VM

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to All Dashboards to expand its drop-down menu.
  2. Click on Performance Troubleshooting in the All Dashboards drop-down menu.
  3. Click on Troubleshoot a VM in the Performance Troubleshooting drop-down menu.

 

 

Time Change

 

  1. We see here that the dashboard times can be changed on this dashboard. The reason they can be modified on this dashboard and not others is due to the fact that this dashboard has Time-Based Widgets in it. The only way you can change the dashboard times is when these Time-Based Widgets are in the dashboard. So we may have noticed that they were grayed out when going through some other dashboards in previous lessons of this lab.
  2. Click on the vIDM virtual machine to ensure that it is selected.
  3. Make sure that the vIDM virtual machine is showing in the About the VM view. If it isn't, select another virtual machine and then click on the vIDM virtual machine again and it will show up now.

 

 

Scroll Bar

 

  1. Click on the scroll bar and drag it down until we see the 6. Is the VM's demand spiking or abnormal? widget can be seen entirely.

 

 

Show Toolbar

 

  1. Hover the mouse pointer in the upper right-hand corner of the widget to have the toolbar show up. Then click on the Show Toolbar (eye) icon to show the toolbar for the widget.

NOTE:  The graph in the lab environment will most likely look different than what is in the screen capture.

 

 

Date Controls

 

  1. Click on the Date Controls (calendar) icon to show the date control options.
  2. We see that the Range: is already selected to Dashboard Time. Since this is a time-based widget and the range is set to Dashboard Time, this allows us to now override the default dashboard time frames. This is the precise reason that we already have the option to select the various time frames (1H, 4H, 24H, 7D and Custom) in the upper right-hand corner of our dashboard.
  3. Click on the GO button.

 

 

Change Time

 

  1. To see the widget automatically updated to the new time period, click on 24H to override the default dashboard time to a 24 hour time frame now.

 

 

Change Time - 24 Hour

 

  1. We see that now the 6. Is the VM's demand spiking or abnormal? widget now reflects a 24 hour time period instead of the previously selected (1) hour period in the chart.

NOTE:  The graph in the lab environment will most likely look different than what is in the screen capture.

 

 

Custom Time Frame

 

  1. Click on the CUSTOM option to set a custom time frame for the dashboard.
  2. Click on the arrow next to Range: to expand its menu.
  3. Then click on Last 30 days.

 

 

GO

 

  1. Click on the GO button to confirm the changes.

 

 

30 Day Time Frame

 

  1. We see now that the graph represents the last month's time frame.

NOTE:  Keep in mind the date associated to the time frame in this screen capture will be different than the date in the actual lab environment that we are currently working in. However, it should reflect the last month of whatever today's date is that we are working in this lab environment.

 

 

Troubleshoot a Datastore

 

Now lets go to another dashboard that DOES NOT have a time-based widget in it to prove our point.

  1. Click on the arrow next to All Dashboards at the top of the user interface.
  2. Click on Performance Troubleshooting from the All Dashboards drop-down menu.
  3. Then click on Troubleshoot a Datastore from the Performance Troubleshooting drop-down menu.

 

 

Time Change Options

 

  1. We see that in this dashboard, the option to change the time frame is grayed out and we are unable to change the time selections. Again this is due to the fact that there aren't any time-based views/widgets in this dashboard.

 

 

Check for Time Widgets

 

Feel free to go through all the widgets and views in this dashboard to see if there are any time-based widgets. However, we know for sure that in this dashboard there aren't any because of the fact that the time settings are grayed out and we are unable to select them.

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on Override Dashboard Times for all Dashboards!

In this lesson, we learned that there is a new option for us to override the default dashboard time frames for the widgets. We now have the option to change the time frames to 1 hour, 6 hours, 24 hours, 7 days, or set a custom time frame. The key thing we learned is that the only way we can change the default time is when there is a time-based widget inside the dashboard. Then we also have to ensure that the Time Range is set to Dashboard Time for it to be enabled and work. And finally, we took a look at the Troubleshoot a Datastore dashboard which didn't have any time-based widgets in it and that the time change option was grayed out.

Up next is the lesson which covers New Super Metric Editor & Metric History.

 

New Super Metric Editor & Metric History


In this lesson, we will discuss the new Super Metric Editor and Metric History.

For those that have previously used the Super metric Editor in previous versions of vRealize Operations, they will agree that it took some time and effort to get used to creating super metrics. With the new version of the editor, it is much quicker easier and more intuitive than ever before making it more enjoyable to use!

To set the stage to create a new super metric in this lab, lets pretend that a virtual administrator is asked by their boss to figure out what the average memory utilization is for all their virtual machines. They need to know this because it is that time of year again where they need to figure out their budget for next year. So they need to figure out what the average memory utilization for their virtual machines to better figure out their memory needs for next year. They have an idea of their average annual virtual machine growth each year, so we just need to give them a general average of how much the average virtual machine has. Then use that times the number of annual growth should give them a rough average of how much memory they will need for the following year.


 

Administration Tab

 

We need to go to the Administration tab in order to get to the Configuration settings which is where we can create Super metrics.

  1. Click on the Administration tab in the menu bar at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Configuration

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to Configuration to expand its drop-down menu.
  2. Click on Super Metrics to show the Super metrics view to the right.

 

 

New Super Metrics

 

  1. Click on the Add New Super Metric (green plus sign) icon.

 

 

Manage Super Metrics - Name

 

We need to now give the Super Metric an appropriate name, so lets call it Average VM Memory Utilization.

  1. Type Average VM Memory Utilization into the Name text field.

 

 

Manage Super Metrics - Next

 

  1. Click on the NEXT button to continue with the configuration.

 

 

Manage Super Metrics - Average

 

In order to do a Super Metric for the Average VM Memory Utilization, we need to create a formula for it.

  1. Type avg into the Functions drop-down.
  2. Click on avg in the drop-down menu.

 

 

Manage Super Metrics - Object Type

 

  1. Type virt inside the parenthesis (i.e. avg(virt) ) to search for "virtual machine" in the drop-down menu.
  2. Click on Virtual Machine in the drop-down menu.

 

 

Manage Super Metrics - Utilization

 

  1. Type util inside the parenthesis (i.e. avg(virtual machine: util) ) to search for "virtual machine" in the drop-down menu.
  2. Click on Memory|Utilization (KB) in the drop-down menu.

NOTE: The Memory|Utilization (KB) may show up in a different order in the drop-down menu and may need to scroll to find it in the list

 

 

Manage Super Metrics - Preview Object

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to Preview to expand it. (Preview is below the Formula section)
  2. Type esx into the Objects text field to search for the esx-03a.corp.local host.
  3. Click on the esx-03a.corp.local host in the drop-down menu to select it.

 

 

Manage Super Metrics - Preview

 

This Preview view is one of the new features in the Super Metrics within vRealize Operations 7.5! For the first time when creating super metrics, we can actually see what it will look like before finishing the configuration of a super metric. This can be useful and a time saver so we aren't having to go back in and edit the super metric after we have navigated away from the configuration.

 

 

Manage Super Metrics - Legacy

 

For those that have created Super Metrics in older versions of vRealize Operations (7.0 and earlier), it wasn't always the easiest tasks to learn. The creation of them was typically a challenge for most to really learn how to create them and create them to where they worked well without a large time investment. With the new Super Metric Editor, that is a thing of the past!

However, if you are familiar with the older interface and still want to continue to use it, we do have the option here under Legacy.

  1. Click on the arrow next to Legacy to expand its information.

 

 

Manage Super Metrics - Assign Object Type

 

  1. Click on Assign to Object Types in the upper left-hand corner of the pop-up window.

 

 

Manage Super Metrics - Object Type

 

  1. Type host into the Select an Object Type text field to search for Host System in the drop-down menu. (it may take a few seconds for the list to show up after typing the word host)
  2. On the far left Manage Super Metric menu, cclick on Host System from the drop-down menu.

 

 

Manage Super Metrics - Next

 

  1. Click on the NEXT button to continue the configuration.

 

 

Manage Super Metrics - Host System

 

We need to now enable the policy against the Hands On Lab Policy.

  1. Click on the radius button under the Host System column heading to enable it.

 

 

Manage Super Metrics - Finish

 

  1. Click on the FINISH button to finish configuring our super metric.

 

 

Manage Super Metrics - Verify

 

  1. We see that our super metric is showing up which verifies that we were successful in creating it.
  2. We also see the formula that we created to get the Average VM Memory Utilization, this is helpful to review at a later time without having to go into edit the super metric itself to find the formula.

 

 

 

Now that we are finished creating our super metric, lets go look at esx-03a.corp.local and see how it looks.

  1. Click on the Search icon in the upper right-hand corner of the user interface.

 

 

Search - esx

 

  1. Type esx into the search text field to search for the esx-03a.corp.local host.
  2. Then click on the esx-03a.corp.local host to select it.

 

 

esx-03a.corp.local - All Metrics

 

In order to see the Super Metrics for this host, we need to go to the All Metrics tab.

  1. Click on the All Metrics tab.

 

 

esx-03a.corp.local - All Metrics View

 

  1. Click on the Show previewable supermetrics icon to enable the previewable metrics. This will need to be enabled in order to have the Super Metric Preview available for use.  

 

 

esx-03a.corp.local - Scroll

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to Super Metric to expand its menu.

IMPORTANT NOTE:  From the time we completed creating the new Super Metric, there is a (1) minute refresh cycle that happens. After the first cycle, it should show the new Average VM Memory Utilization super metric listed under Super Metric as it is in the screen capture.

  1. Double-click on Average VM Memory Utilization to load the data in the view to the right.

NOTE: If you don't see Super Metric listed in the drop-down menu, wait one minute and refresh (F5 key) the Google Chrome browser and it will show up shortly.

 

 

esx-03a.corp.local - Super Metric

 

Here we have the super metric chart and we should see our first metric point. Keep in mind the date and data in the screen capture will be different than what we see in this lab environment.

  1. Hover the mouse pointer over the metric point (purple dot) on the graph to bring up the information pop-up.
  2. The information pop-up tells the date and time the metric point was recorded as well as it references the Average VM Memory Utilization super metric we just created.

NOTE:  The graph dates in the lab environment will not match what is in the screen capture.

 

 

esx-03a.corp.local - Super Metric Preview

 

IMPORTANT NOTE:  Then after the second (1) minute refresh cycle since the super metric was created, we should be able to see the data point in the super metric graph. We may need to refresh the browser to get it to show up in the below steps.

  1. Click on the arrow next to Super Metric Preview to expand its drop-down menu.

NOTE: If you don't see Super Metric Preview listed in the drop-down menu, wait one minute and refresh (F5 key) the Google Chrome browser and it will show up. If you refresh the browser window, we will need to expand All Metrics > Super Metrics Preview > Average VM Memory Utilization.

  1. Double-click on Average VM Memory Utilization to load the data in the view to the right.

 

 

esx-03a.corp.local - Metrics Preview

 

As stated earlier in this lesson, the Preview view is one of the new features in the Super Metrics within vRealize Operations 7.5! The Preview calculates historic super metric values on the fly. Keep in mind the date and data in the screen capture will be different than what we see in this lab environment.

NOTE:  The graph dates in the lab environment will not match what is in the screen capture.

 

 

esx-03a.corp.local - Export

 

Another item we need to mention is that we have the ability to export the graph and data to a (CSV) Comma Separated Value document. Follow the below steps to accomplish the exporting of the data. Since we are in a lab environment, we won't actually be downloading the CSV.

DO NOT DO THESE STEPS IN THIS LAB!

  • Click on the arrow icon.
  • Click on Download comma separated data

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on New Super metric Editor!

In this lesson, we learned how to create our own specialized Super Metric. We did this in the new Super Metric Editor which is much easier than previous versions of the editor. We really didn't need to know how to use it and could easily figure out what values to put in based on our desired output. We simply started typing in what variable we were looking for and it would find it for us. Then we also looked at the new Super Metric Preview feature which calculates historic super metric values on the fly.

Up next is the lesson which covers Metric Correlation in Metric Charts.

 

Log in to the vRealize Operations HVM Instance


This lab environment is running two different instances of vRealize Operations and one instance of vRealize Log Insight. We have the different vRealize Operations instances in order to be able to work through different use cases that have unique requirements. The lab vRealize Operations instances are as follows:

  • Live Instance: Connected to the small running vSphere environment in the lab. There isn't a large inventory of objects in this instance but it allows us to interact with vCenter Server.
  • Historical View Mode (HVM) Instance: Running a time loop of data that was captured in the past. This instance has a much larger inventory of objects but since it is not currently connected to a vCenter Server, we cannot perform any actions here.

In this lesson we will be using the HVM instance of vRealize Operations.

If you are already logged into the HVM (not live) instance of vRealize Operations, click here to skip ahead.


 

Open the Chrome Browser from Windows Quick Launch Task Bar

 

If your browser isn't already open, launch Google Chrome

  1. Click the Chrome icon on the Windows Quick Launch Task Bar

 

 

Open the vRealize Operations - HVM Instance Tab

 

The browser home page has links to the different instances of vRealize Operations that are running in the lab.

  1. Click the vRealize Operations - Historical Instance link to open the vRealize Operations UI in a new browser tab

 

 

Log in to vRealize Operations

 

The user and password information should already be filled in. However, if needed type them in.

username: admin

password: VMware1!

  1. Click LOG IN

 

 

Metric Correlation in Metric Charts 


In this lesson, we will be discussing the new feature that assists us in troubleshooting using Metric Correlation with metric charts.

Metric correlation can be very useful in greatly speeding up root cause analysis troubleshooting when having issues with a virtual machine, host, etc. We can now pin correlated metrics to the All Metrics view. There is intra-object correlation that is run against all metrics allowing us to see what the issue is affecting since it will only use positive correlations only. Essential this means that it will inform and show us the related parent-child objects that are having issues at the same time.

For example, lets say we have a (3) tier application that is having an issue and is being reflected on the web server, it will show us the metrics potentially any issues that the application server, database server, host(s) that the virtual machines reside on, etc.


 

 

NOTE:  Be sure that we are currently in the (HVM) Historical View Mode instance of vRealize Operations 7.5 before doing this step.

  1. Click on the Search icon in the upper right-hand corner of the user interface.

 

 

vsan-esxi-03

 

We are going to look at vsan-esxi-03 in this scenario because we are pretending that we have received complaints that multiple virtual machines are having performance issues and we have discovered that they are on this particular host.

  1. Type vsan-esxi-03 into the Search text field.
  2. Click on vsan-esxi-03 to select it and to go to the details of this host.

 

 

All Metrics

 

  1. Click on the All Metrics tab.

 

 

Minimize Topology View

 

Lets minimize the Topology View so we can see more of the metrics view.

  1. Click on the double arrow to minimize the Topology View on the right side of the user interface.

 

 

Utilization

 

Normally we go right to the All Metrics section, but we see that for vsan-esxi-03 there is utilization issues represented in yellow, we can also go to this section to see the associated metrics that we need to look at.

  1. Click on the arrow next to Utilization to expand its menu.
  2. Double-click on CPU|Demand (%) to bring up the metrics chart in the view to the right.
  3. Double-click on CPU|Usage (%) to bring up the metrics chart in the view to the right.

 

 

Metrics Correlation

 

NOTE:  The graphs and associated data will look different in the screen capture than what we are seeing in the lab environment.

Although this may not be the best example to represent the metrics correlation between parent-child relationship issues like I explained at the beginning of this lesson, it does show some correlated issues.

  1. In the CPU|Demand (%) metric chart, it is running hot and continually is peaking above 115.
  2. Then we see that in the CPU|Usage (%) it is maxed out at 100% utilization.

Going back to the scenario that we discussed at the beginning of this lesson with the (3) tier application, let's pretend the application server was the root cause of the issue. If we apply this concept to this metric chart, then we could pretend that the one chart was the application server and the other was the web server. It would have then shown the correlation between the application and web server both having CPU contention. Then after further investigation, we would discover that the root cause was the application server.

So we can imagine how correlating the metrics of parent-child objects can be used to narrow down quickly the root cause of issues. Again, vRealize Operations 7.5 will only show us positive correlations to narrow down what the interrelated issue is in the metrics charts.

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on Metric Correlation in Metric Charts!

In this lesson, we learned that the new feature of Metric Correlation can be very useful to quickly and easily troubleshoot down to the root cause of an issue in our virtual environment. Metric Correlation only shows us the positive correlations (represented in yellow) between the parent-child relationships in order to get us to the root issue quicker.

Up next is the lesson which covers Grouping in List Views Based on Relationships.

 

Grouping in List Views Based on Relationships


In this lesson, we will discuss grouping objects in list views based upon their relationships.

We can now create list views  based on their relationships. This allows us to group list view results based on the parent objects while providing summary information available per group as well as grand total.

Although already created for us, we will recreate a list view that shows all powered off virtual machines by cluster. We will do this so we can be familiar with how to go about creating one. This is just one example of thousands of possible list views by grouping that we can create.


 

Dashboards

 

  1. Click on the Dashboards tab in the menu bar at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Views

 

IMPORTANT NOTE: If there are any views listed already under "Views" in which we are clicking on in this step. Hover your mouse over the View name on the far right and click on the "X" to delete the view from the list. Do this for any and all views listed already. Then proceed with the below step.  

  1. Click on Views in the Navigation Pane on the left side of the user interface.

 

 

New View

 

Creating list views is not new to vRealize Operations, however, the ability to create a list view by a particular groupings is. So lets create a new list view that shows us all the powered off virtual machines in a given cluster.

  1. Click on the Create View (green plus sign) icon to start the process of creating a new view.

 

 

New View - Name

 

  1. Type Powered Off VMs by Cluster in the Name text field.
  2. Then click on 2. Presentation to view the presentation settings.

 

 

New View - Presentation

 

  1. Click on List to select it as the presentation type for our View.
  2. Then click on 3. Subjects to view the subjects settings.

 

 

New View - Subjects

 

  1. Type Virtual Machine in the Subjects text field.
  2. Then click on Virtual Machine in the drop-down menu.

 

 

New View - Group By

 

We see here that we have the "Group by" selection, this is what's new in vRealize Operations 7.5. So now we can create the list view and in our example we want to group by Cluster Compute Resources.

  1. Type Cluster into the Group by text field.
  2. Drag the scroll bar down until we can see Cluster Compute Resource in the drop-down menu.
  3. Then click on Cluster Compute Resources in the drop-down menu.

 

 

New View - Power State

 

  1. Click on 4. Data to the data settings.
  2. Click on the arrow and select Properties from the drop-down menu.  
  3. Type Power State into the Filter text field and hit the ENTER key on the keyboard.
  4. Double-click on Power State to add it to the DATA field to the right.

 

 

New View - Hardware

 

  1. Delete Power State that you previously typed in and type hardware into the Filter text field and hit the ENTER key on the keyboard.
  2. Click on the arrow next to Hardware to expand its drop-down menu.
  3. Double-click on Disk Space (GB) to add it to the DATA field to the right.
  4. Double-click on Memory (KB) to add it to the DATA field to the right.
  5. Double-click on Number of virtual CPUs to add it to the DATA field to the right.

 

 

New View - Power State

 

  1. Click on Summary|Runtime|Power State under the Data tab to select it.
  2. Type Power State in the Metric label: text field to change the column header name to be more friendly.

NOTE: After we type the friendly name we gave it in the Metric label: text field, we will see the name change to what we typed under the Data column on the left replacing the original title Summary|Runtime|Power State.

  1. Then click on the arrow next to Sort order: and click on Descending.

 

 

New View - Disk Space

 

  1. Click on Configuration|Hardware|Disk Space under the Data tab to select it.
  2. Type Disk Space in the Metric label: text field to change the column header name to be more friendly.

NOTE: After we type the friendly name we gave it in the Metric label: text field, we will see the name change to what we typed under the Data column on the left replacing the original title Configuration|Hardware|Disk Space.

  1. Then click on the arrow next to Sort order: and click on Descending.

 

 

New View - Memory

 

  1. Click on Configuration|Hardware|Memory under the Data tab to select it.
  2. Type Memory in the Metric label: text field to change the column header name to be more friendly.

NOTE: After we type the friendly name we gave it in the Metric label: text field, we will see the name change to what we typed under the Data column on the left replacing the original title Configuration|Hardware|Memory.

  1. Then click on the arrow next to Sort order: and click on Descending.

 

 

New View - vCPUs

 

  1. Click on Configuration|Hardware|Number of virtual CPUs under the Data tab to select it.
  2. Type vCPUs in the Metric label: text field to change the column header name to be more friendly.

NOTE: After we type the friendly name we gave it in the Metric label: text field, we will see the name change to what we typed under the Data column on the left replacing the original title Configuration|Hardware|Number of virtual CPUs.

  1. Then click on the arrow next to Sort order: and click on Descending.

 

 

New View - Filter

 

  1. Click on the Filter tab.
  2. Click on the arrow and select Properties from its drop-down menu.
  3. Click inside the Pick a property text field.

 

 

New View - Property

 

We see after clicking inside the Pick a property text field, it brings up a drop-down menu and puts us into the Filter text field.

  1. Type Power State into the Filter text field and hit the ENTER key on the keyboard to filter for the Power State object.
  2. Click on the arrow next to Summary to expand its drop-down menu.
  3. Click on the arrow next to Runtime to expand its drop-down menu.
  4. Then double-click on Power State to select it.

 

 

New View - Contains

 

  1. Click on the arrow to expand its drop-down menu.
  2. Then click on contains to select it.

 

 

New View - Powered Off

 

  1. Click inside the Property value text field to expand its drop-down menu of options. (it may take a few seconds for the drop-down menu to show, if it doesn't, click inside the text field again)
  2. Click on Powered Off in the drop-down menu.

 

 

New View - Select Preview Source

 

Now we will click on the "Select preview source" link so we can see an example of what our new list view will look like. This is helpful by ensuring the list view looks the way we want we intended it to look. Without this ability to preview the view, we would have had to save it and go back into the new view by editing it to make the appropriate changes. So this saves us the potential burden of going back and forth in the event we needed to make changes.

  1. Click on the Select preview source text link in the upper right-hand corner of the pop-up window.

 

 

New View - vSphere World

 

Here we will select vSphere World so that in our list view, we will see all cluster groupings with their associated powered off virtual machines. However, we have the ability to select an individual cluster if that was what we wanted for our new view.

  1. Click on vSphere World to select all clusters in the environment.
  2. Then click on the OK button.

 

 

New View - Preview

 

We should now see a list of powered off VMs with the preview source of our entire environment and all associated clusters, If we don't see the list in this preview, repeat the previous steps until we see a list of powered off virtual machines.

 

 

New View - Save

 

  1. Click on the SAVE button to save all of the configurations for our view.

 

 

New View - Verify

 

  1. Now we see our newly created Powered Off VMs by Cluster view in the list of all views within this instance of vRealize Operations.

NOTE:  The newly created view may be listed higher or lower in the list of views in the lab environment than what is in the screen capture.

 

 

Environment

 

  1. Click on the Environment tab in the menu bar at the top of the user interface.

 

 

vSphere Hosts and Clusters

 

  1. Click on vSphere Hosts and Clusters under the vSphere Environment drop-down menu in the Navigation Pane on the left side of the user interface.

 

 

vSphere World

 

  1. Click on vSphere World under the vSphere Host and Clusters drop-down menu in the Navigation Pane on the left side of the user interface.
  2. Then click on the more... tab.

 

 

Details Tab

 

  1. Click on the Details tab.
  2. Then type Powered Off VMs into the Quick filter (Name) text field and hit the ENTER key on the keyboard. to search for the new view we just created.

 

 

Powered Off VMs by Cluster View

 

Here we see the list of all Views in this instance of vRealize Operations 7.5 to include our newly created view.

  1. Click on the Powered Off VMs by Cluster view in the list of views.
  2. Now we see our new view that we created. We see the first column is the Group Name column which is basically the names of all the clusters in this environment. Feel free to scroll down to look at the associated data for each of the clusters in the environment.

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on Grouping in List Views Based on Relationships!

In this lesson, we learned that we could create views to present whatever metrics or properties we wanted and then group them by various objects like datacenters, clusters, vCenter servers, etc. We created a view that had powered off VMs by cluster along with their disk space, memory and vCPUs.

Up next is the lesson which covers New Alert Groupings for (1 & 4 Hours).

 

New Alert Groupings for (1 & 4 Hours)


In this lesson, we will take a look at the new alert grouping options of 1 and 4 hour time periods.

In previous versions of vRealize Operations, the alert groupings started out by grouping for the current day. The only problem with that is that if you have a lot of alerts for the current day but are trying to find a specific one, it might be difficult to find it sifting through the entire days logs. Now in vRealize Operations 7.5, we have the default 1 and 4 hour groupings for alerts. This will help reduce the time it takes the virtual administrator to sift through alerts to find ones that have happened in the last few hours.


 

Alerts

 

  1. Click on the Alerts tab in the menu bar at the top of the user interface.

 

 

All Alerts

 

We see that after clicking on the Alerts tab in the menu bar, it automatically selects All Alerts in the Navigation Pane on the left side.

 

 

Group By

 

  1. Click on the down-arrow next to Group By to expand the options.
  2. Then click on Time in the Group By drop-down menu.

 

 

Alerts - 1 Hour

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to 1 Hour to expand and list all alerts within the last hour.
  2. We see that in this instance there is only one alert listed for the vSAN Adapter.

NOTE: There could potentially be a different alert or multiple alerts in the lab environment we are currently working in.

 

 

Alerts - 4 Hours

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to 4 Hours to expand and list all alerts within the last hour.
  2. We see that in this instance there is only one alert listed for the vSAN Adapter.

NOTE: There could potentially be a different alert or multiple alerts in the lab environment we are currently working in.

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on New Alert Groupings for (1 & 4 Hours)!

In this lesson, we learned that vRealize Operations 7.5 has added two new alert groupings (1 & 4 Hour). This helps narrow down the alerts in the recent hours to make it easier to find the appropriate alert the virtual administrator is looking for.

Up next is the lesson which covers ServiceNow Integration.

 

ServiceNow Integration


In vRealize Operations 7.5, we now have native ServiceNow integration. This means that we no longer have to create custom web hooks or shims to make this work. This offers a faster time to resolution out of the box because of the new alert notifications that can send directly to ServiceNow and create an incident. Currently, it is only a one-way communication integration from vRealize Operations 7.5 to ServiceNow.

vRealize Operations 7.5 Alert methods:

  • Log file plugin
  • Rest notifications
  • Email
  • SNMP traps
  • ServiceNow Notification

ServiceNow incidents can be assigned to groups or individuals without custom assignment policies. There are (19) customizable fields including category, business service, impact, assignment group, assigned to and severity.


 

Menu - Administration

 

  1. Click on the Administration menu tab at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Navigation Menu - Management

 

  1. Click on the down-arrow next to Management in the Navigation Pane to expand it.
  2. Then click on Outbound Settings in the Management drop-down menu.

 

 

Outbound Settings

 

  1. Click on the Service Now item under Outbound Settings.
  2. Then click on the Edit (pencil) icon to go into the Service Now settings.

 

 

Add/Edit Outbound Instance

 

Here we see the pre-configured settings for the ServiceNow integration within the historical instance of vRealize Operations. Since it is already configured and this is only for example purposes of this lesson, we will not modify any of the information in this pop-up window. If we had the password for the associated user account "sa-vrops", we could click on the TEST button to verify account access to ServiceNow.

  1. Click on the CANCEL button to ensure no changes are made in this pop-up window.

 

 

Menu - Alerts

 

Now lets go look at the Alerts since this new ServiecNow integration allows us to take alerts and send it to ServiceNow to automatically create a ServiceNow ticket.

  1. Click on the Alerts menu tab at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Alert Settings

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to Alert Settings to expand the alert settings drop-down menu.
  2. Then click on Notification Settings in the alert settings drop-down menu.

 

 

Notification Settings

 

We see here that we already have (2) notification setup (ECommerce & Skyline). Lets go into the ECommerce application notification and edit it a little in regards to the ServiceNow integration.

  1. Click on the item SNOW - ECommerce Virtual Machine CPU usage is at 100% for an extended period of time under Notification Settings.  
  2. Then click on the Edit (pencil) icon to edit the item.

NOTE:  The items may be listed in a different order than what we are seeing in our lab environment.

 

 

Edit Rule

 

Here we see the Edit Rule pop-up window which contains all the settings for this rule.

  1. We see that this is already configured for the Method Service-Now Notification Plugin for Service Now.
  2. Here is where the (19) customizable items are listed.

 

 

Edit Rule - Scroll Bar

 

  1. Click on the Scroll Bar and drag it all the way to the bottom in order to see the remainder of the customizable items.

 

 

Edit Rule - Customizable Items

 

  1. Here we see the remainder of the customizable items.

 

 

Filter Criteria

 

NOTE:  If we have already gone through "Module #1 - A Quick Overview of What's New in vRealize Operations 7.5", then this step is already been done and can be skipped.

Here we see that we also have the option to filter the scope by Object Type, Object, Tags, Applications and Tiers. If we wanted to edit this configuration to filter by E-Commerce application, we would do the following steps.  

  1. Click on the down-arrow next to Scope to see the Scope sub menu.
  2. Then click on Applications in the Scope sub menu.

 

 

Scope - Application

 

NOTE:  If we have already gone through "Module #1 - A Quick Overview of What's New in vRealize Operations 7.5", then this step is already been done and can be skipped.

After we selected Applications from the Scope drop-down menu, we now see that it presents to us another drop-down menu to the right of where we selected Applications.

  1. Click on the down-arrow to select the specific application we want for the scope.
  2. Then click on E-Commerce from the drop-down menu.

 

 

Notification Trigger

 

NOTE:  If we have already gone through "Module #1 - A Quick Overview of What's New in vRealize Operations 7.5", then this step is already been done and can be skipped.

  1. Click on the down-arrow for the Notification Trigger selection.
  2. Then click on Alert Definition to keep the same setting.

 

 

Criticality - Critical

 

NOTE:  If we have already gone through "Module #1 - A Quick Overview of What's New in vRealize Operations 7.5", then this step is already been done and can be skipped.

  1. We see that we already have the alert definition set as VIRTUAL MACHINE CPU USAGE IS AT 100% FOR AN E..., we are going to keep this setting.
  2. Click on the down-arrow for the Criticality selection.
  3. Then click on Critical from the drop-down menu.

 

 

Criticality - Immediate

 

  1. Click on the down-arrow for the Criticality selection.
  2. Then click on Immediate from the drop-down menu.

 

 

Criticality - Critical & Immediate

 

  1. We now see that the Criticality is set to alert for Critical and Immediate alerts.
  2. Click anywhere outside the Criticality box to return to the main pop-up window.

 

 

Advanced Filters

 

  1. Click on the down-arrow next to Advanced Filters to expand all the potential filters available.
  2. Here we see the for the Advanced filters options which we will leave the defaults for the purposes of this lab.

 

 

Save

 

In this lab environment, we technically do not have the ServiceNow application/server running to connect to, so saving the changes we made don't actually affect anything.

  1. Click on the SAVE button to save our changes.

 

Conclusion


Congratulations, we have just completed Module #4 on Enhancements in Troubleshooting and Remediation!

In this lesson, we learned numerous new capabilities such as agent installation for application monitoring and how the Advanced Relationship Topology view can show us all the relationships between an application and its associated virtual machine, database, network, host, etc.

We discussed how we could create custom properties in the user interface such as when we created the custom property for the virtual machine owner as an example. We then looked at how dashboards with time-based views/widgets in them allowed us to use the new dashboard override capability to set the dashboard times based on 1H, 6H, 24H 7D and custom time frames.

Next we looked at how we can now correlate metric charts together to make troubleshooting even easier to find the root cause of an issue. We saw how we could create groupings with custom list views based on their relationships. Then we looked at the new feature of alert groupings in (1) and (4) hour groups to assist in troubleshooting events that happened in the last (4) or less hours.

And finally we looked at the native integration we now have with ServiceNow. vRealize Operations alerts can now be sent directly to ServiceNow to automatically create a ticket within ServiceNow and removing the need for human interaction to create tickets in the system.  

Up next is Module #5 - Enhancements in Compliance Assessments and Remediation.


 

You've finished Module 4!

If you are looking for information related to what lessons we accomplished in this module, please see the below reference links.

If you are looking for additional general information on (vROPs) vRealize Operations 7.5, try one of these:

If you are looking for additional information on vRealize Operations, you can start here: https://www.vmware.com/products/vrealize-suite.html

You may proceed to the next module by advancing to the next page. If you want to jump to a particular module, follow one of the links below.

 

 

How to End Lab

 

Or if you want to end your lab,

  1. Click on the END button at the top of the page.

 

Module 5 - Enhancements in Compliance Assessments and Remediation (30 minutes)

Introduction


This lab module provides a brief overview of the following topics:

  • Custom Compliance Rules and Templates
  • vRealize Orchestrator Compliance Remediation

 


Log in to the vRealize Operations Live Instance


This lab environment is running two different instances of vRealize Operations and one instance of vRealize Log Insight. We have the different vRealize Operations instances in order to be able to work through different use cases that have unique requirements. The lab instances are as follows:

  • Live Instance: Connected to the small running vSphere environment in the lab. There isn't a large inventory of objects in this instance but it allows us to interact with vCenter Server.
  • Historical View Mode (HVM) Instance: Running a time loop of data that was captured in the past. This instance has a much larger inventory of objects but since it is not currently connected to a vCenter Server, we cannot perform any actions here.

In this lesson we will be using the live Instance of vRealize Operations.

If you are already logged into the live (not historical) instance of vRealize Operations, click here to skip ahead.


 

Open the Chrome Browser from Windows Quick Launch Task Bar

 

If your browser isn't already open, launch Google Chrome

  1. Click the Chrome icon on the Windows Quick Launch Task Bar

 

 

Open the vRealize Operations - Live Instance Tab

 

The browser home page has links to the different instances of vRealize Operations that are running in the lab.

  1. Click the vRealize Operations - Live Instance link to open the vRealize Operations UI in a new browser tab

 

 

Log in to vRealize Operations

 

vRealize Operations is integrated with VMware Identity Manager which we will use for user authentication in this lab.

VMware Identity Manager should be pre-selected as the identity source. However, if it is not you will choose it.

  1. Click the drop-down arrow
  2. Select VMware Identity Manager
  3. Click REDIRECT to take you to the authentication page

 

 

 

VMware Identity Manager Login

 

For this vRealize Operations instance, the lab uses VMware Idenity Manager as the authentication provider. This allows for seamless integration with vRealize Log Insight.

The user and password information should already be filled in. However, if needed type them in.

username: holuser

password: VMware1!

  1. Click Sign in

 

Custom Compliance Rules and Templates


In this lesson, we will be discussing the new Compliance Rules and Templates!

Keeping our corporate data secure is critical to any business. Personal information such as social security numbers, healthcare records, and credit cards are big business for thieves who sell this information on the black market. Healthcare, banking, and retail industries are high-value targets, but the truth is that any business is at risk. Just think about all the information that our HR department has in their files. Social Security numbers, insurance information, 401k, and payroll make HR data a virtual gold mine. That is why maintaining good security hygiene is the most important role of any IT or security team and why compliance standards have been established.

vRealize Operations 7.5 can help make our compliance headaches a lot less painful by aiding in the initial configuration of our environment as well as managing configuration drift. There are (6) vRealize Operations 7.5 Compliance Packs as well as the vSphere Security Configuration Guide which has been updated to support the vSphere 6.7 U1 guide.

If we are running vRealize Operations Advanced or Enterprise edition, we can easily install compliance packs for HIPAA, ISO, DISA, CIS, PCI, and FISMA. These compliance packs will compare our vSphere environment against the applicable hardening guides and generate alerts when configurations are not in compliance.

Most of the compliance packs for vRealize Operations cover configurations for multiple vSphere objects. For example, ESXi Hosts, vCenter, Virtual Machines, Distributed Virtual Switches, and Distributed Port Groups. We can see a breakdown of each of these object types and display how many are non-compliant vs the total number of objects. vRealize Operations also provides a compliance score at the top of the page which shows the percentage of objects that are compliant with the corresponding template.

However, as some customers have pointed out, there are circumstances where we may want to exclude certain object types from being displayed. For example, if we have a deployment team that is responsible for the builds and configuration of virtual machines, there is no need to call out how many ESXi hosts are non-compliant or include these in their compliance score. Perhaps we are a healthcare provider who also accepts credit card payments. Instead of using two separate compliance packs such as HIPAA and PCI, wouldn't it be great to combine both? Or maybe our company has its own guidelines to ensure consistency and we want to create our own compliance template based on these.

In vRealize Operations 7.5, we have included Custom Compliance Templates to allow us to pick and choose the compliance definitions that matter to our organization. After all, there isn't one compliance template that can fit every companies needs when it comes to compliance.

vRealize Operations allows up to six custom compliance templates to be added to the Compliance page. It allows for granular control of existing compliance packs, combining multiple compliance packs, or even including our own custom compliance alerts. If we do create our own compliance alert, just set the alert subtype for our alert definition to compliance and it will be immediately selectable in our custom compliance template.

The result is a fine-tuned summary allowing us to focus on the compliance aspects that are important to our organization.


 

Home

 

NOTE:  Make sure we are in the Live instance of vRealize Operations 7.5 before continuing to the next step.

  1. Let's make sure we are on the Home tab. Click on the Home tab at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Manage Configuration

 

  1. Click on the Compliance text link in the Manage Configuration box.

 

 

Navigation - Compliance

 

We see here that there are several compliance standards that we can download and enable such as...

  • vSphere Security Configuration Guide
  • ISO Security Standards
  • PCI Security Standards
  • DISA Security Standards
  1. Now click on the arrow twice on the right side to view the remaining available compliance templates.

 

 

Navigation - Compliance (continued)

 

We see the remaining compliance templates which are for CIS, HIPAA and FISMA security standards.

 

 

Navigation - Compliance

 

  1. Click on the left-facing arrow twice to return to the beginning of the list of compliance templates.

 

 

Enable, Download or Install

 

  1. We see for the vSphere Security Configuration Guide that it is already downloaded but not currently enabled. If we see only the ENABLE link, that confirms it has already been downloaded and installed into vRealize Operations.
  2. For the ISO Security Standards template, it has the INSTALL and DOWNLOAD links. This of course means that we will need to first download it, install it and finally enable it if we wanted to use it.

 

 

Compliance - Actions

 

Besides the default (OOTB) Out-of-the-Box compliance standards that we have already looked at, we have the ability to also create our own custom compliance templates. So lets create our own custom compliance template to let us know when we have violated licensing for our environment.

  1. Click on the arrow next to Actions to expand the Actions drop-down menu.

We see that we have the options to Create, Edit, and Delete compliance standards.

  1. Click on Create in order to create our own compliance standard.

 

 

Compliance - Create

 

We are going to create our own compliance standard that will monitor all of our VMware licensing in our virtual infrastructure. This way we will know if a license is going to expire soon, or has expired (both temp and permanent licenses) as well as if we have exceeded our license capacity.

  1. Type Licensing Compliance in the Name text field.

 

 

Compliance - Selections

 

  1. Click on the Name column to sort the list for us.
  2. Click on all (5) of the licensing notification options (see list below as well as screen capture).
  • License has expired
  • License usage exceeded its capacity
  • License will expire in less than 10 days
  • License will soon expire
  • Product evaluation will soon expire
  1. Then click on the FINISH button.

 

 

Compliance - License Compliance

 

NOTE:  The numbers associated to the compliance data may be different in the lab environment than what is in the screen capture.

The benefit of this compliance template we created is that it shows us our current licensing compliance. But it will also continuously monitor it for us and let us know if any license related item is no longer in compliance and will alert us. This goes for any other settings that we set in a custom compliance template, not just licensing like we selected in this case.

  1. We see that at the moment we are in compliance as far as licensing for our VMware environment.

 

 

Compliance - View Alerts

 

  1. Click on the VIEW ALERTS text link in the Object Breakdown widget.
  2. We see that we currently do not have any alerts since all our VMware licenses are valid and not already expired or expiring soon. If there are any soon to be expired within 10 days or already expired licenses, we would see the associated alerts listed here.

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on Custom Compliance Rules and Templates!

In this lesson, we learned that vRealize Operations 7.5 has greatly enhanced the ability for us to keep our virtual environments compliant no matter what compliance standards we have to adhere to. There are (6) out-of-the-box compliance standards as well as the vSphere Security Configuration Guide that meet the needs of most companies today. However, if those default compliance standards templates are not appropriate for us, then we can create our own custom compliance rules within a template. We finished up by quickly creating our own custom template to look at our VMware licensing.  

Up next is the lesson which covers vRO Compliance Remediation.

 

Log in to the vRealize Operations HVM Instance


This lab environment is running two different instances of vRealize Operations and one instance of vRealize Log Insight. We have the different vRealize Operations instances in order to be able to work through different use cases that have unique requirements. The lab vRealize Operations instances are as follows:

  • Live Instance: Connected to the small running vSphere environment in the lab. There isn't a large inventory of objects in this instance but it allows us to interact with vCenter Server.
  • Historical View Mode (HVM) Instance: Running a time loop of data that was captured in the past. This instance has a much larger inventory of objects but since it is not currently connected to a vCenter Server, we cannot perform any actions here.

In this lesson we will be using the HVM instance of vRealize Operations.

If you are already logged into the HVM (not live) instance of vRealize Operations, click here to skip ahead.


 

Open the Chrome Browser from Windows Quick Launch Task Bar

 

If your browser isn't already open, launch Google Chrome

  1. Click the Chrome icon on the Windows Quick Launch Task Bar

 

 

Open the vRealize Operations - HVM Instance Tab

 

The browser home page has links to the different instances of vRealize Operations that are running in the lab.

  1. Click the vRealize Operations - Historical Instance link to open the vRealize Operations UI in a new browser tab

 

 

Log in to vRealize Operations

 

The user and password information should already be filled in. However, if needed type them in.

username: admin

password: VMware1!

  1. Click LOG IN

 

 

vRealize Orchestrator Compliance Remediation


In this lesson, we will discuss the updated (vRealize Orchestrator) vRealize Orchestrator Management Pack version 3.0.

With the improved vRealize Orchestrator management pack for vRealize Operations 7.5, out-of-the-box vRealize Orchestrator workflows allow us to automatically trigger workflows based on alerts getting generated by vRealize Operations. There are (6) templates available which are the HIPAA, DISA, Dias, PCI, ISO, FISMA and CIS Security Standards as well as the vSphere Security Configuration Guide.

We also have the ability to create custom workflows can also be created in vRealize Orchestrator. Furthermore, the vRealize Operations HTML5 (UI) User Interface makes running vRealize Orchestrator workflows incredibly easy and without logging into the vSphere Client to perform almost any operations task in your data center.

There is also another enhancement which was added, however it is not directly related to compliance remediation updates. In previous versions, when vRealize Operations would send an alert to vRealize Orchestrator to trigger an automated response, we couldn't see what specific alert was the one that initiated the automated response in vRealize Orchestrator. This made troubleshooting somewhat difficult when looking for that initiating alert.  The new version 3.0 of the management pack now provides the "alertid" associated to any alerts that trigger a vRealize Orchestrator automated workflow. So now we are to see exactly what vRealize Operations alert triggered the vRealize Orchestrator workflow.

Available with vRealize Orchestrator Management Pack version 3.0:

  • vSphere Security Guide 6.7 U1 remediation for ESXi hosts.
  • Customize enforcement.
  • Email notification option.
  • Added as an Action for the alert recommendation.
  • Can be fully automated.

NOTE:  For the purposes of this lesson, we will not configure vRealize Orchestrator to automatically reconfigure our hosts to meet compliance standards.

 

The benefit of this integration is for example if we are checking our ESXi hosts against the best practice settings of the vSphere Security Configuration Guide, we can automate the remediation to get the hosts into compliance. This ensures that our hosts are always meeting the compliance settings we have set for them. As we add additional hosts to our environment, this will ensure that any new hosts also get the same exact settings that we have as a configuration standard for our environment.

This screen capture is an example of an environment that is using the vSphere Security Configuration Guide to ensure their host(s) configurations meet the best practice of the guide. As we see, there are several hosts that are not compliant according to the guide and need to be reconfigured appropriately.

 

We can also configure the vRealize Orchestrator workflow to email us after it has made the configuration change to the host(s). We see in the screen capture some of the email settings that we can configure for notifications.

 

The email will tell us what settings were changed according to our compliance settings, the ones it couldn't and require manual adjustments because of lack of APIs, etc. The screen capture is an example of what the email could contain based on what configurations were/were not changed.


 

Home

 

NOTE:  Make sure we are in the (HVM) Historical View Mode instance of vRealize Operations 7.5 before continuing to the next step.

  1. Let's make sure we are on the Home tab. Click on the Home tab at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Manage Configuration

 

Currently the (HVM) Historical View Mode instance of vRealize Operations is already configured to use the vSphere Security Configuration Guide for this environment. So lets go into the Compliance area and see if there are any hosts violating the compliance standards.

  1. Click on the Compliance text link in the Manage Configuration box within the Quick Start dashboard.

 

 

Compliance Dashboard

 

  1. By default, the vSphere Security Configuration Guide is already selected for us since it is the first one in the list. It currently shows there are (597) hosts that are not compliant and (16) that are compliant.
  2. We see here the Object Breakdown that are being watched for compliance in our environment which include vSphere Distributed Port Groups, Host Systems, vCenter Servers, Virtual Machines and vSphere Distributed Switches.
  3. Now click on the VIEW ALERTS text link.

 

 

Compliance Alerts List

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to the second alert with the title "ESXi Host is violating VMware vSphere Security Configuration Guide for vCenter version 6.5 or 6.7".
  2. Then click on the first text link that says "ESXi Host is violating VMware vSphere Security Configuration Guide for vCenter version 6.5 or 6.7".

 

 

w1-hs1-g0403.eng.vmware.com - Actions

 

IMPORTANT NOTE:  We will NOT be clicking on the RUN ACTION button to ensure we are not putting any additional unnecessary load on our lab systems that would be required to complete these remediation tasks.

  1. We see here where it informs us of the violations and offers us the ability to view additional metrics, logs and events associated to this violation as well as the link to take us to the vSphere Security Configuration Guide itself.

Because of the vRealize Orchestrator workflows we previously discussed, we could automate the remediation of these violations by clicking on the RUN ACTION button. (DO NOT CLICK BUTTON)

 

 

w1-hs1-g0403.eng.vmware.com - Symptoms

 

From the bottom of the dashboard we have the list of symptoms of the violation which include items such as SSH Timeout not set, BPDU filter on the host being locked out, NTP firewall rules not configured, etc. So before having it automatically remediate all these settings from the symptoms, the best practice would be to review all of them first to be sure that you want to implement all the settings according to the vSphere Security Configuration Guide.

Now lets take a quick look at some of the vRealize Orchestrator workflows that can do the remediation!

 

 

Chrome - Minimize

 

  1. Click on the Minimize icon to minimize the Google Chrome browser window.

 

 

vRealize Orchestrator - Icon

 

  1. Double-Click on the vRealize Orchestrator Client icon on the desktop to launch vRealize Orchestrator on the desktop.

 

 

vRealize Orchestrator - Login

 

  1. Type VMware1! Into the Password text field.
  2. Click on the Login button to log into vRealize Orchestrator.

NOTE:  It may take a minute to open vRealize Orchestrator, please be patient.

 

 

vRealize Orchestrator - Workflows Tab

 

  1. Click on the Workflows tab in the upper left-hand corner of the user interface.
  2. Click on the arrow next to the vRealize Operations Manager folder in the Navigation pane of the user interface to expand the list of all the available workflows for vRealize Operations Manager.  

 

 

vRealize Orchestrator - vSphere Security

 

In the workflows tab and under the vRealize Operations Manager folder is a list of all the workflows that can be used to automate the remediation of compliance issues in our virtual infrastructure.

  1. Click on the arrow next to the vSphere Security Configuration Guide folder to expand the options under it.
  2. Click on the arrow next to the Configuration folder to expand the options under it.
  3. Click on the Configure Host Security Config Data workflow.

 

 

Inputs

 

  1. Click on the Inputs tab in the Content Pane to the right.
  2. If you remember previously, two of the symptoms that caused the host to have violations were the settings for NTP and SSH. We see that the first two configuration settings are those two exact symptoms.

In the interest of time for this lab, we wanted to show you briefly where in vRealize Orchestrator were some of the automation settings are located to remediate the hosts.

Feel free to look through the vRealize Orchestrator interface to view the other workflows and associated settings that can be automated.

 

 

vRealize Orchestrator - Close

 

  1. Click on the X icon of the user interface to close vRealize Orchestrator.

 

 

vRealize Orchestrator - Verify Exit

 

  1. Click on the Exit button to close vRealize Orchestrator since we won't be using it any longer.

 

 

Maximize Google Chrome

 

  1. Click on the minimized Google Chrome browser in the task bar at the bottom of the desktop to maximize it.

 

Conclusion


Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on vRealize Orchestrator Compliance Remediation which is the last lesson of Module #5!

In module #5, we discussed and learned about the numerous compliance security rules and templates. Some of them are vSphere, DISA, FISMA, HIPAA, CIS, PCI, and ISO compliance templates. We also learned that vRealize Operations 7.5 now provides us the ability to create our own custom compliance templates. The example of a custom security configuration was for VMware licensing.

Then we discussed the new version 3.0 (vRO) vRealize Orchestrator management pack. We logged into vRO and looked at the numerous workflows that would allow us to automate the remediation of our compliance standards.

Up next is Module #6 which covers the Enhancements to the Integrations with vSAN (15 minutes).


 

You've finished Module 5!

If you are looking for information related to what lessons we accomplished in this module, please see the below reference links.

If you are looking for additional general information on (vROPs) vRealize Operations 7.5, try one of the below links:

If you are looking for additional information on vRealize Operations, you can start here: https://www.vmware.com/products/vrealize-suite.html

You may proceed to the next module by advancing to the next page. If you want to jump to a particular module, follow one of the links below.

 

 

How to End Lab

 

Or if you want to end your lab,

  1. Click on the END button at the top of the page.

 

Module 6 - Enhancements to the Integrations with vSAN (15 minutes)

Introduction


This lab module a brief overview of the following topics:

  • Planning (What-If) for (HCI) Hyper-Converged Infrastructure
  • Cost Modeling for (vSAN) Virtual SAN in Cost Drivers
  • New (vSAN) Virtual SAN Dashboards

Log in to the vRealize Operations HVM Instance


This lab environment is running two different instances of vRealize Operations and one instance of vRealize Log Insight. We have the different vRealize Operations instances in order to be able to work through different use cases that have unique requirements. The lab vRealize Operations instances are as follows:

  • Live Instance: Connected to the small running vSphere environment in the lab. There isn't a large inventory of objects in this instance but it allows us to interact with vCenter Server.
  • Historical View Mode (HVM) Instance: Running a time loop of data that was captured in the past. This instance has a much larger inventory of objects but since it is not currently connected to a vCenter Server, we cannot perform any actions here.

In this lesson we will be using the HVM instance of vRealize Operations.

If you are already logged into the HVM (not live) instance of vRealize Operations, click here to skip ahead.


 

Open the Chrome Browser from Windows Quick Launch Task Bar

 

If your browser isn't already open, launch Google Chrome

  1. Click the Chrome icon on the Windows Quick Launch Task Bar

 

 

Open the vRealize Operations - HVM Instance Tab

 

The browser home page has links to the different instances of vRealize Operations that are running in the lab.

  1. Click the vRealize Operations - Historical Instance link to open the vRealize Operations UI in a new browser tab

 

 

Log in to vRealize Operations

 

The user and password information should already be filled in. However, if needed type them in.

username: admin

password: VMware1!

  1. Click LOG IN

 

 

Planning (What-If) for (HCI) Hyper-Converged Infrastructure 


In this lesson, we will discuss the Planning (What-If) scenarios for (HCI) Hyper-Converged Infrastructure such as (vSAN) Virtual SAN.

Virtual machines running on vSAN datastores can now benefit from Workload Placement in vRealize Operations 7.5. This means Workload Placement can now migrate virtual machines between vSAN clusters to enforce Operational Intent (balance, moderate or consolidate virtual machines) and Business Intent (placement on hosts or clusters based on vSphere tagging). Specifically, the Workload Optimization is respectful of three aspects of vSAN that influence placement decisions:

  • Storage Policy
  • Slack Space
  • Resync

Each of these is considered during a workload optimization event to insure to any moves will enhance workload performance and not create any bottlenecks.

As we know, vSAN requires each virtual machine to be assigned a storage policy. This provides a set of basic storage capabilities related to data availability and protection as well as capacity reservations. Workload Placement relies on vCenter to validate each virtual machine’s storage policy against all available target vSAN datastores. Any vSAN datastores which can support the VMs storage policy are considered candidates for migration destination.

So, what is Slack Space? Since vSAN is a distributed storage solution, it needs free space to perform these actions that are transparent to the user. Any of the changes listed will use this slack space temporarily to adjust to the new conditions. However, it cannot be deemed as capacity always used for temporary actions, since the resynchronization may have occurred the result of the user prescribing a higher level of resilience. As such, vRealize Operations now understands how much slack space is needed by a vSAN datastore so it can be subtracted from the overall space available.

Finally, a resync can occur any time vSAN determines the need to do so. It protects the availability of data in accordance with virtual machine storage policies. This can create additional network IO on the cluster. Given that this important operation should not be interrupted or impacted by migrating virtual machines, Workload Optimization will avoid migration of virtual machines to vSAN clusters running resync.

A couple of things to keep in mind when using Workload Optimization in a vSAN environment:

  1. In order to get the full benefits we will need to enable the vSAN Management Pack. That’s easy to do because it’s native inside of vRealize Operations now.
  2. Workload Placement will not migrate a virtual machine from vSAN to a datastore cluster or vice-versa (e.g. it will only move a vSAN virtual machine to another vSAN cluster).

 

Home

 

NOTE:  Make sure we are in the (HVM) Historical View Mode instance of vRealize Operations 7.5 before continuing to the next step.

  1. Let's make sure we are on the Home tab. Click on the Home tab at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Optimize - Plan

 

  1. Click on the Plan text link in the Optimize Capacity box.

 

 

What-If Analysis

 

After clicking on the Plan text link, it automatically takes us to What-If Analysis in the Navigation Pane in the left-hand side of the user interface.

 

 

Add HCI Nodes

 

  1. Click on the ADD HCI NODES text link in the Hyperconverged Infrastructure box.

 

 

Add HCI Nodes - Name

 

IMPORTANT NOTE: Since this is a lab environment with limited resources, we don't have the additional (HCI) Hyper-Converged Infrastructure nodes to actually add to this lab environment. We will just be talking about what to select and enter in this page only and will not be able to actually add any (HCI) Hyper-Converged Infrastructure nodes.

  1. Type Add HCI Node in the Scenario Name text field.
  2. Click on the arrow next to LOCATION to expand its menu.
  3. Then click on DC-vSAN (vSAN VC) location.

NOTE: We would have the option to SAVE or RUN SCENARIO if we actually had nodes to add to the environment.

 

 

Add HCI Nodes - Location

 

  1. Keep the default selection for the vSAN Branch Office.
  2. Then click on the SELECT SERVER button.

 

 

Add HCI Nodes - Select Server

 

  1. Click on the first server type in the list to select it.
  2. Then click on the OK button.

 

 

Add HCI Nodes - Server Details

 

  1. Here we see the details of the HCI node that we previously selected to add to our environment. It provides the hardware specifications, manufactured year and the cost of the node.
  2. Here is where we can select the number of these particular HCI nodes as needed, we will keep the setting of (1).

 

 

Add HCI Nodes - Date

 

This will be as far as we can go in this (HVM) Historical View Mode instance of vRealize Operations. We can't run the scenario since this is in "historical" view mode unfortunately. We also could not have configured this in the "live" instance of vRealize Operations since we do not have "extra available vSAN nodes" in the lab environment to use for this scenario. So we will just save this scenario only and not run it.

  1. Click on the calendar icon and set the date to (1) month from the current date. (keep in mind the dates in the screen capture will be different than the actual date that we are doing this lesson)
  2. Then click on the SAVE button.

 

 

Add HCI Nodes - Verify

 

  1. We see it has successfully saved our add an HCI node scenario under the Saved Scenarios tab.

This scenario can be stacked with the other ones if we wish to see the "big picture" of combining scenarios. This is especially useful when we have created scenarios based on future projects that contain the addition or subtraction of resources to our environments.

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on Planning (What-If) for (HCI) Hyper-Converged Infrastructure!

In this lesson, we learned that in vRealize Operations 7.5, we now have the ability to plan and run scenarios for adding Hyper-Converged Infrastructure nodes to our environments. We walked through the process of planning to add an additional HCI node to our branch office.

Up next is the lesson which covers Cost Modeling for (vSAN) Virtual SAN in Cost Drivers.

 

Cost Modeling for (vSAN) Virtual SAN in Cost Drivers


In this lesson, we will discuss the ability to do cost modeling for (vSAN) Virtual SAN.

We now have a distinct cost driver section to highlight (HCI) Hyper-Converged Infrastructure boxes with vSAN datastore rates computed by factoring various vSAN parameters. We now have the ability to enter "total cost" instead of component level costs. Along with the utilization based cost model, we now can view costs computed based on resource allocation.

We still however have the ability to enter in a per-server cost similar to the "Server Hardware: Traditional" cost settings. The Compute Setting column references the percentage of the server costs that represent compute, the remainder is for the storage costs.

NOTE:  If upgrading to vRealize Operations 7.5 from 6.7/7.0, we would need to re-enter the costs after the upgrade has completed.


 

Menu - Administration

 

  1. Click on the Administration tab in the menu bar at the top of the user interface.

 

 

Configuration - Cost Settings

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to Configuration to expand its menu.
  2. Then click on Cost Settings under the Configuration drop-down menu.

 

 

Cost Settings - HCI

 

  1. Click on the Cost Drivers tab in the Cost Settings content page.
  2. Then click on Server Hardware : Hyper-Converged text link under the Private Cloud Cost Driver column.

 

 

Cost Settings -  Total Monthly Costs

 

  1. Notice there are (8) of these servers for a total current value of $3.77K for the monthly cost.
  2. Select the drop-down arrow next to the forth from the top in the list that totals equal to $3.77K.

 

 

Cost Settings -  Select Servers

 

  1. Drag the scroll bar down until we can see the everything associated to these servers.
  2. Then click on Select Server(s) for customization text link under the Number of Servers column.

 

 

Server Customization - Select Microsoft Servers

 

  1. Click on the check boxes next to the (3) Microsoft hosts (sc3-vesxi-msft-03.cmbu.local, sc3-vesxi-msft-07.cmbu.local, and sc3-vesxi-msft-08.cmbu.local) in the list to select them.
  2. Then click on the OK button.

NOTE:  The order in which these (3) vesxi-msft-0*.cmbu.local servers are listed could be different.

 

 

Server Customization - Price Change

 

Now that we have selected the specific server, we will now change some of the options such as Purchase Type and the Cost of the server. Although we can change the Purchase Date as well, we will not be changing it for the purposes of this lab lesson.

  1. Select the drop-down arrow under the Purchase Type column to see the options of either Owned or Leased. Leave this option as Owned.
  2. Type 20000.00 into the Cost Per Server column to change the cost of the server.
  3. We see the price for the (3) servers we selected reflects a total of $60.0K which is correct.

NOTE:  Make sure not to enter a "comma" into the Cost Per Server text field (i.e. $20,000.00) or it will cause an error in the calculation process.

 

 

Server Customization - Add Cost Per Server

 

Now we need to go in and select the remaining (5) out of the original (8) servers and select them in order for their cost to reflect in the total monthly cost column. For these remaining (5) servers, we are going to keep the existing cost of $16,962.93 per server.

  1. Click on the + ADD COST PER SERVER text link.

 

 

Server Customization - Select Servers

 

  1. Click on all the check boxes to select the remaining (5) servers to set their cost.
  2. Now click on the OK button.

 

 

Server Customization - Save

 

  1. Click on the SAVE button to save the changes.
  2. We see here the save was successful.

 

 

Compare Monthly Cost

 

If you remember from our earlier step, we looked at what the monthly cost was for the servers prior to making any changes. The monthly cost was $2.26k per month.

  1. Now we see that the total monthly cost has increased to $2.412K from the original $2.26K, so our changes now reflect the new monthly cost appropriately.

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on Cost Modeling for (vSAN) Virtual SAN in Cost Drivers!

In this lesson, we learned that vRealize Operations can provide us with the associated costs of our infrastructure. Out of the box, it has standard industry prices already entered for us. However, if we want to get more true and accurate pricing of our actual costs, we can go into the Cost Settings and manually enter in our actual costs. In this lesson, we went in and modified the cost of (3) HCI servers and changed them to $20K each and verified the total monthly cost for the servers increased accordingly.

Up next is the lesson which covers New vSAN (Virtual SAN) Dashboards.

 

New (vSAN) Virtual SAN Dashboards


In this lesson, we will look at the new (vSAN) Virtual SAN dashboards that are natively available in vRealize Operations 7.5.

There are several new vSAN dashboards that have been added to the interface.  For example, if we have vSAN Stretched Clusters configured in our environment, the dashboard now reflects that configuration out-of-the-box. It monitors preferred and secondary fault domains side by side for capacity, utilization, and the health of related objects. We can now quickly identify which fault domain your virtual machines are currently running on.

Next we have new Summary Views which offer us an improved overview of the vSAN objects. We also have new summary views for vSAN Clusters, Fault Domains and Disk Groups. The Cluster Summary shows cluster, fault domain, host and disk group performance information. The Fault Domain summary shows fault domain, host and disk group performance information. The Disk Group shows disk group, host, cache and capacity disk performance information.

Since vSAN encryption came into play, there wasn't an easy way to view what was encrypted and what wasn't. We now have a vSAN Disk Encryption Status dashboard to make encryption validation easy. This ensures compliance on vSAN encrypted clusters. The vSAN encryption is available as a property on all vSAN objects from cluster to individual capacity and cache disks. New alert definitions include encryption discrepancies between vSAN cluster and disk. Users can now build custom compliance dashboards to quickly check encryption compliance.


 

Menu - Dashboards

 

  1. Click on the Dashboards tab in the menu bar at the top of the user interface.

 

 

All Dashboards

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to All Dashboards to expand the drop-down menu.
  2. Click the Capacity & Utilization from the All Dashboards drop-down menu.
  3. Then click on vSAN Capacity Overview.

 

 

vSAN Capacity Overview Dashboard

 

  1. Drag the scroll bar down until we can see vSAN Cluster(wdcc01).
  2. Click on the vSAN Cluster(wdcc01) in the List of vSAN Cluster(s). Select a cluster widget.

Below is a list of the information presented in this dashboard:

  • Cluster Utilization (%)
  • Potential Cost Savings from Reclaimable VMs (per month)
    • VMs with Snapshots
    • Idle VMs
    • Powered Off VMs
  • Dedupe & Compression Savings (all flash only)
    • Dedupe/Compression Overview|Ration
    • Dedupe/Compression Overview|Savings
    • Dedupe/Compression Overview|Used After (GB)
    • Dedupe/Compression Overview|Used Before (GB)

 

 

vSAN Stretched Clusters Dashboard

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to All Dashboards to expand the drop-down menu.
  2. Click the Capacity & Utilization from the All Dashboards drop-down menu.
  3. Then click on vSAN Stretched Clusters from the Capacity & Utilization drop-down menu.

 

 

vSAN Stretched Clusters Dashboard

 

Below is a list of the information presented in this dashboard:

  • Stretched Clusters
    • # of Hosts and VMs
    • # of Disk Groups
    • # of Capacity Disks
    • Disk Space Configured|Used
    • Dedupe Enabled
    • Disk Type (SSD or HDD)
  • Preferred & Secondary Site
    • CPU, Memory and Disk Capacity
    • Cores
    • Disk Space Used
  • Preferred & Secondary Site - Utilization (%)

 

 

vSAN Stretched Clusters Dashboard (continued)

 

  1. Drag the scroll bar down all the way to the bottom of the user interface so we can see the remaining widgets in the dashboard.

Below is a list of the information presented in this dashboard:

  • Time Remaining for each resource CPU|Memory|Disk (Preferred & Secondary site)
  • Relationship Topology View (Preferred & Secondary site)
  • List of VMs at each site

 

 

vSAN Operations Overview Dashboard

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to All Dashboards to expand the drop-down menu.
  2. Click the Operations from the All Dashboards drop-down menu.
  3. Then click on vSAN Operations Overview from the Operations drop-down menu.

 

 

vSAN Operations Overview Dashboard

 

  1. Drag the scroll bar down until we can see vSAN Cluster(wdcc01).
  2. Click on the vSAN Cluster(wdcc01) in the Select a vSAN Cluster widget.

Below is a list of the information presented in this dashboard:

  • A vSAN environment summary
    • vSAN Clusters
    • Hosts
    • Raw/Remaining Capacity
    • VMs on vSAN Cluster
    • IOPS served
    • at Latency (ms)
  • Cluster storage (total, used and used %) and compute (CPU and Memory workload)
  • Cluster wide IOPS and Cluster wide average disk latency
  • Alert volume historical graph
  • Cluster wide throughput
  • Maximum latency among capacity disks

 

 

vSAN Operations Troubleshooting Dashboard

 

  1. Click on the arrow next to All Dashboards to expand the drop-down menu.
  2. Click the Performance Troubleshooting from the All Dashboards drop-down menu.
  3. Then click on Troubleshoot vSAN from the Performance Troubleshooting drop-down menu.

 

 

vSAN Operations Troubleshooting Dashboard (continued)

 

  1. Drag the scroll bar down until we can see vSAN Cluster(wdcc01).
  2. Click on the vSAN Cluster(wdcc01) in the 1. Search for a vSAN Cluster (use filter) widget.

We now see tons of troubleshooting related helpful information for vSAN! Basically everything a virtual administrator needs to effectively troubleshoot any and all vSAN related issues. We will drag the scroll bar down to see all the associated information in all the views/widgets because they are so valuable.

We see the following first few views at the very top of the dashboard related to:

  • Search for a vSAN Cluster (use filter)
  • Any alerts on the cluster, hosts, VMs or disks?
  • vSAN Cluster Health, Performance & Utilization
  • Are the relatives healthy?
  • Cluster I/O Read Latency
  • Cluster I/O Write Latency

 

 

vSAN Operations Troubleshooting Dashboard (continued)

 

  1. Drag the scroll bar down until we see the next set of views/widgets.
    • Max CPU Demand among ESXi Hosts
    • Max Memory Demand among ESXi Hosts
    • Disk Space Used on the Cluster
    • Cluster Network Utilization (MBps)
    • Cluster Disk Throughput (MBps)
    • Cluster IOPS

 

 

vSAN Operations Troubleshooting Dashboard (continued)

 

  1. Drag the scroll bar down to continue viewing the next set of views/widgets.
    • Is vSAN cache latency high?
    • Are we reading from Cache? (n/a for all-flash)
    • Is Write Buffer low?
    • Are outstanding I/O's high?
    • Is IOPS Congestion high?
    • How often does congestion happen?

 

 

vSAN Operations Troubleshooting Dashboard (continued)

 

  1. Drag the scroll bar down until we see the last set of views/widgets at the bottom of the dashboard.
    • Is Capacity Disk latency high?
    • Is Disk Group running low on capacity?
    • Is the disk groups usage balanced
    • Any errors on the Disk Group?
    • Any dropped packets on the vSAN Network?
    • Cache Disks: Any hardware issues? Use heatmap configurations to check
    • Capacity Disks: Any hardware issues? Use heatmap configurations to check

Congratulations, we have just completed the lesson on New (vSAN) Virtual SAN Dashboards which is the last lesson of Module #6!

In this lesson, we reviewed (4) vSAN related dashboards which were the vSAN Capacity Overview, vSAN Stretched Cluster, vSAN Operations Overview and vSAN Troubleshooting dashboards. These dashboards are essential for any virtual administrator who manages vSAN environments of any kind. They will help them quickly and efficiently do daily operational tasks like monitoring as well as troubleshoot any vSAN issue.

 

Conclusion


Congratulations on completing Module #6 - Enhancements to the Integrations with vSAN!

In this module, we discussed  the new Planning (What-If) for (HCI) Hyper-Converged Infrastructure and went through the steps as though we were planning to add an additional host to the (vSAN) Virtual SAN environment. Next we went over the cost modeling for vSAN in the Cost Drivers section and modified a few of the server costs to show how our total costs changed. And lastly we went over the numerous vSAN dashboards that help virtual administrators effectively and easily manage their vSAN environment from within vRealize Operations 7.5.

Up next is Module #7 which covers the Enhancements to the integrations with VMware Cloud on AWS (15 minutes).


 

You've finished Module 6!

If you are looking for information related to what lessons we accomplished in this module, please see the below reference links.

If you are looking for additional general information on (vROPs) vRealize Operations 7.5, try one of the below links:

If you are looking for additional information on vRealize Operations, you can start here: https://www.vmware.com/products/vrealize-suite.html

You may proceed to the next module by advancing to the next page. If you want to jump to a particular module, follow one of the links below.

 

 

How to End Lab

 

Or if you want to end your lab,

  1. Click on the END button at the top of the page.

 

Module 7 - Enhancements to the integrations with VMware Cloud on AWS (15 minutes)

Introduction


This lab module a brief overview of the following topics:

  • New Views within the AWS Management Pack  

New Views within the AWS Management Pack


In this lesson, we will discuss the new and enhanced views and dashboards within the (AWS) Amazon Web Services Management Pack version 3.1 for vRealize Operations 7.5.

Since this lab environment DOES NOT have a connection out to the internet, the management pack has not been installed in this instance of vRealize Operations in the lab environment. So we will be providing only information and associated EXAMPLE screen shots of the dashboards. We will not be able to look at or use any AWS related dashboards in our lab environment.

A common question is whether vRealize Operations can manage workloads in VMware Cloud on AWS, and the answer is resounding YES! to vRealize Operations. In the example of the VMware Cloud on AWS offering, the vCenter server in AWS looks just like any other vCenter instance in the vSphere Web Client and can be managed and monitored as such!

Updated AWS Management:

  • Manage your AWS inventory across regions and accounts
  • Support for (24) AWS services
    • EC2, RDS, LB, Lambda, Redshift, etc.
  • Reclaim unused AWS resources and save money
  • View CloudFormation stack relationships
  • Automatically integrates CloudWatch for deeper analysis

AWS Specific Content (OOTB) Out-of-the-Box:

  • (16) new dashboards and summary pages
  • (34) new alerts to help simplify troubleshooting
  • Custom summary dashboards

NOTE:  All the dashboards in the AWS management pack has a view which shows where we have an instance of that particular service by AWS region, so we will assume that in each dashboard description.


 

AWS Services

 

New to version 3.1 of the AWS Management Pack is the list of AWS Services Dashboards. We see in the example screen shot all the different AWS services that now can be viewed in dashboards which give us a more thorough view of our AWS environment within vRealize Operations 7.5.

Coverage for a broad range of AWS services:

  • Auto discovered
  • Monitored
  • Relationships between services

Service Specific Dashboards:

  • Deep-dive troubleshooting

 

 

AWS Service Availability Dashboard

 

 

The AWS Service Availability is one of the new critical dashboards for administrators since it monitors our AWS services. Every service and object is continually checked for availability. The dashboards represent the availability of each service at its (SLA) Service Level Availability dashboards. It will also provide the associated availability alerts for each of the services to keep administrators updated on any issues that they need to be made aware of.

 

 

AWS CloudFormation Dashboard

 

In the new management pack, we can now manage workloads at the CloudFormation level by seeing deployments across all our AWS regions. We can select a specific stack as seen in this screen capture (US East (N. Virginia)) to see the new Topology View for that specific stack and related components. The stack view tells us the name of the particular stack and what the current status is of that stack.

 

 

Compute: EC2 Dashboard

 

Anyone that is running workloads in AWS most certainty have EC2 instances and need to monitor them. With the new EC2 dashboard, we can see the objects, type, owner, status of them, auto-scaling instances, CPU usage, Disk IOPS, network usage (I/O), longest running instances and more!

 

 

Compute: Elastic Containers Dashboard

 

The dashboard for (ECS) Elastic Container Services provides us with a list of all the instances in each AWS region. It also provides the details about the services such as the CPU and memory usage and status for each one. For the ECS clusters, it provides CPU/memory reservation, CPU/memory usage and the status of each one.

 

 

Compute: Lambda Functions Dashboard

 

Lambda Functions are growing in popularity, so we have added a dashboard for them as well. This dashboard shows all Lambda functions by name, invocations, durations, errors, throttling and keys for each function.  

 

 

Database: Dynamo Dashboard

 

The Dynamo Database dashboard provides views for the clusters, nodes and tables. Within each view for the clusters and nodes are error requests, failed requests, fault requests, item cache misses, query cache misses and scan cache misses. For the table view, there are request latency, returned records, returned bytes, read capacity, write capacity and status.

 

 

Database: Elasticache Dashboard

 

The Elasticache Database dashboard contains views for both the clusters and nodes. Within the views, they contain information on name, version, node type, status, cache missed, evictions and replication logs.

 

 

Database: RDS Dashboard

 

The RDS Database dashboard is needed whenever using databases to ensure performance and reliability. This dashboard contains numerous types of information such as number of connections, adapter type object type, class, status, stack name, CPU usage, read/write latency and much more.

 

 

Database: Redshift Dashboard

 

The Redshift Database dashboard contains numerous types of information such as database connections, read/write latency, CPU/disk usage and overall health.  

 

 

Desktop: Workspaces Dashboard

 

Running virtual desktops in the cloud has become more popular than ever before. Disaster Recovery is one of the most popular use cases at the moment and AWS has also joined the masses. Monitoring virtual desktops is very important since performance directly affects personnel making it difficult to get work done. So virtual desktop administrators need to monitor the performance of them constantly. The Workspaces dashboard provides them information about their availability, status, maintenance, if they are stopped or running, if in an unhealthy state and if a user is connected.

 

 

Network: Load Balancers Dashboard

 

The Load Balancer dashboard contains important information about Application, Network and Classic load balancers. It also provides details such as names, connections, consumed LCU, new connections, various errors, latency, requests, healthy/unhealthy and much more.

 

 

Network: VPC Dashboard

 

In order to consume any service from AWS, weare required to have at least one (VPC) Virtual Private Cloud. This dashboard provides a ton of information about our VPCs such as policies, collection state/status and what other services are being used in them. There are also views for the VPC VPN Connections and (NAT) Network Address Translation Gateways.

 

 

Storage Dashboard

 

The Storage dashboard provides an overview of all the different types of storage services we may be using in AWS. It shows the regions where and if we have (EBS) Elastic Block Storage Volumes or (S3) Simple Storage Service. The EBS Volume view tells us the name, capacity, max queue and max write times. The S3 Buckets view provides us the name, objects and size of the buckets.

 

 

Simple Queue Service Dashboard

 

The Simple Queue Service dashboard shows any delayed, non-visible, visible, empty received, deleted and sent messages that we may have with the queue service.

Congratulations, we have just completed the last lesson of Module #7 which is also the last module of the entire HOL-2001-01-CMB vRealize Operations 7.5 - What's New lab!

In this lesson, we learned about a number of new AWS dashboards that were added in the AWS Management Pack version 3.1 for vRealize Operations 7.5. As the management pack gets enhancements, it makes it easier and easier to be able to fully manage and monitor our AWS instances right from our on-premise instance of vRealize Operations.

 

 

Conclusion


You've finished Module 7 which is the last module of the entire (HOL-2001-01-CMD) "vRealize Operations 7.5 - What's New lab"!

In this module, we went over the integration points between vRealize Operations 7.5 and ServiceNow. We discussed how we can take an alert from vRealize Operations 7.5 and automatically send it directly to ServiceNow and have it create a new ticket from within ServiceNow. This cuts down on the manual processes that normally would be done between the virtual administrator and the service desk personnel who would create the ticket typically.


 

You've finished Module 7!

If you are looking for information related to what lessons we accomplished in this module, please see the below reference links.

Lesson 1 - New Views within the AWS Management Pack:  https://blogs.vmware.com/management/2019/04/whats-new-in-vrealize-operations-7-5-a-technical-overview-part-2.html

If you are looking for additional information on (vROPs) vRealize Operations enhancements to the integration with the VMware Cloud on AWS Management Pack, try one of these:

If you are looking for additional information on vRealize Operations, you can start here: https://www.vmware.com/products/vrealize-suite.html

You may proceed to the next module by advancing to the next page. If you want to jump to a particular module, follow one of the links below.

 

 

Test Your Skills!

 

Now that you’ve completed this lab, try testing your skills with VMware Odyssey, our newest Hands-on Labs gamification program. We have taken Hands-on Labs to the next level by adding gamification elements to the labs you know and love. Experience the fully automated VMware Odyssey as you race against the clock to complete tasks and reach the highest ranking on the leaderboard. Try the vRealize Operations Odyssey lab

 

 

How to End Lab

 

Or if you want to end your lab,

  1. Click on the END button at the top of the page.

 

Conclusion

Thank you for participating in the VMware Hands-on Labs. Be sure to visit http://hol.vmware.com/ to continue your lab experience online.

Lab SKU: HOL-2001-01-CMP

Version: 20200908-155320