VMware Hands-on Labs - HOL-1844-02-SLN


Lab Overview - HOL-1844-02-SLN - VMware Cloud Foundation - Hybrid Cloud

Lab Guidance


The Table of Contents can be accessed in the upper right-hand corner of the Lab Manual.

In this interactive simulation lab, we will introduce you to the VMware Cloud Foundation offering on the IBM cloud.

Lab Module List:

 Note: To learn more about deploying Cloud Foundation in a private cloud environment see HOL LabHOL-1844-01-SLN in the main catalog.

Lab Captains:

This lab manual can be downloaded from the Hands-on Labs Document site found here:

http://docs.hol.vmware.com


 

Location of the Main Console

 

  1. The area in the RED box contains the Main Console.  The Lab Manual is on the tab to the Right of the Main Console.
  2. A particular lab may have additional consoles found on separate tabs in the upper left. You will be directed to open another specific console if needed.
  3. Your lab starts with 90 minutes on the timer.  The lab can not be saved.  All your work must be done during the lab session.  But you can click the EXTEND to increase your time.  If you are at a VMware event, you can extend your lab time twice, for up to 30 minutes.  Each click gives you an additional 15 minutes.  Outside of VMware events, you can extend your lab time up to 9 hours and 30 minutes. Each click gives you an additional hour.

 

 

Activation Prompt or Watermark

 

When you first start your lab, you may notice a watermark on the desktop indicating that Windows is not activated.  

One of the major benefits of virtualization is that virtual machines can be moved and run on any platform.  The Hands-on Labs utilizes this benefit and we are able to run the labs out of multiple datacenters.  However, these datacenters may not have identical processors, which triggers a Microsoft activation check through the Internet.

Rest assured, VMware and the Hands-on Labs are in full compliance with Microsoft licensing requirements.  The lab that you are using is a self-contained pod and does not have full access to the Internet, which is required for Windows to verify the activation.  Without full access to the Internet, this automated process fails and you see this watermark.

This cosmetic issue has no effect on your lab.  

 

Module 1 - Hybrid Cloud Introduction (manual only) (15 minutes)

Introduction (manual only)


VMware Cloud Foundation is VMware’s new unified SDDC platform for the private and public cloud. VMware Cloud Foundation brings together VMware’s compute, storage, and network virtualization solutions into a natively integrated stack, delivering enterprise-ready cloud infrastructure with unique automation and management capabilities for simplified operations that is consistent across private and public clouds.

 

Cloud Foundation was purposely designed to simplify the process of deploying, operating, and maintaining a VMware based cloud.  At its core are the key SDDC building blocks of compute virtualization (vSphere), storage virtualization (vSAN), and network virtualization (NSX).  Along with these key SDDC components Cloud Foundation introduces the VMware SDDC Manager, an infrastructure automation tool that simples the deployment, configuration and ongoing maintenance of the SDDC stack, to include automated patching and upgrades.

Along with unifying the SDDC software stack, Cloud Foundation also makes it easy to leverage the advanced monitoring and management capabilities of the vRealize Suite.  Each Cloud Foundation implementation includes vRealize Log Insight to provide centralized log aggregation.  In addition, vRealize Operations and vRealize Automation can optionally be deployed to provide monitoring and cloud management services.  

Finally, along with the vRealize Suite, Cloud Foundation also includes built in integration with VMware Horizon allowing it to fully automate the deployment and configuration of virtual desktop environments.

 

Cloud Foundation can be deployed both as a private cloud, running inside your existing data center on qualified servers and switches, as well as ‘as-a-service’, running on hosted infrastructure managed by public cloud providers.  Thus, cloud foundation provides a common platform across both the private and public cloud, enabling a true hybrid cloud.  This common platform provides several benefits:


Conclusion


In this module you were given an overview VMware Cloud Foundation in the hybrid cloud

 

Congratulations on completing  Module 1.

If you are looking for additional information on Cloud Foundation in the Public Cloud, try one of these:

Proceed to any module below which interests you most.

 


 

How to End Lab

 

To end your lab click on the END button.  

 

Module 2 - Deploying VMware Cloud Foundation in a Public Cloud (15 minutes)

Introduction


This module introduces you to the IBM Cloud portal and provide an overview on how to deploy VMware Cloud Foundation in the IBM Cloud.

The IBM Cloud is a public hosting platform that provides the elasticity and capacity flexibility that organizations have come to expect from a public cloud provider. VMware and IBM have teamed up to provide a Cloud Foundation service on the IBM Cloud making it easy for customers to deploy, and operate a VMware based public cloud based on VMware Cloud Foundation.

 

You access the Cloud Foundation service by logging into the IBM Cloud portal and selecting it from the list of available solutions.  You will be prompted to select your desired hardware platform and a data center location, after which the IBM Cloud team will take care of the racking and stacking of the hardware and imaging the hardware in preparation for Cloud Foundation.  Once this has been completed, the VMWare SDDC Manger will be used to deploy the unified SDDC platform and instantiate the Cloud Foundation instance.  Everything is fully automated.  Once deployed you simply logon to the vSphere web client and manage your public infrastructure just as you would any on-premises VMware environment.


Interactive Simulation: Deploying VCF in a Public Cloud


This interactive simulation walks you through

  1. How to deploy VMware Cloud Foundation on IBM Bluemix.

The interactive simulation will allow you to experience steps which are too time-consuming or resource intensive to do live in the lab environment.

  1. Click here to open the interactive simulation. It will open in a new browser window or tab.
  2. When finished, click the “Return to the lab” link to continue with this lab.

Conclusion


In this module you were given an overview of how to deploy vCF in IBM Bluemix public cloud.

 

Congratulations on completing  Module 2

If you are looking for additional information on Cloud Foundation in the Public Cloud, try one of these:

Proceed to any module below which interests you most.

 


 

How to End Lab

 

To end your lab click on the END button.  

 

Module 3 - Extending vRealize Automation to the Public Cloud (15 minutes)

Introduction


Once you have deployed Cloud Foundation on the IBM Cloud you are ready to begin deploying workloads.  Ideally, you will want to leverage any existing templates that you already have in your private cloud.  In addition, you expect to be able to deploy workloads in the public cloud just as easy, and just as quickly as you can in your on-premises private cloud.  Fortunately, this is easily done by leveraging your existing vRealize Automation deployment.

Once Cloud Foundation is deployed you will need to add it to your existing vRealize Automation instance as an endpoint.  

 

Once the endpoint is added you simply make your existing VM templates available in the public cloud.  One way to do this is to replicate the content library so that it will synchronize templates between the vCenter Server instances running in the private cloud with the vCenter Server Instances running in the public cloud.

 

With the templates copied, the public cloud vCenter instances added as an endpoint, you are ready to begin creating blueprints and deploying workloads in the public cloud.


Interactive Simulation: Extending vRealize Automation to the Public Cloud


This interactive simulation walks you through

  1. The steps to synchronize the content library
  2. The creation of blue prints to begin deploying workloads in IBM Cloud

The interactive simulation will allow you to experience steps which are too time-consuming or resource intensive to do live in the lab environment.

  1. Click here to open the interactive simulation. It will open in a new browser window or tab.
  2. When finished, click the “Return to the lab” link to continue with this lab.

Extending vRealize Automation to the Public Cloud - iSIM notes



 

Configure the vSphere Content Library for the Hybrid Cloud

Today, the organization currently uses the vSphere content library in their on-premesis private cloud to manage the distribution of approved templates, ISOs, and customization specifications. The organization in-turn creates blueprints in vRealize Automation's design canvas that consume these templates and customization specifications.

Now that the organization is on the path to the hybrid cloud with their new VMware Cloud Foundation instance running on the IBM Cloud, they need these approved templates, ISOs and customization specifications to also be synchronized to the public cloud.  

In this portion of the interactive simulation, we will show how to extend the organization's content library to their VMware Cloud Foundation instance running on the IBM Cloud and synchronize the organizations approved content.  We'll also show how to build blue prints in vRealize Automation and begin deploying workloads in the public cloud.

This part of the lab is presented as a Hands-on Labs Interactive Simulation. This will allow you to experience steps which are too time-consuming or resource intensive to do live in the lab environment. In this simulation, you can use the software interface as if you are interacting with a live environment.

The orange boxes show where to click, and the left and right arrow keys can also be used to move through the simulation in either direction.

 

 

Reviewing the Private Cloud Content Library

Begin by logging into the private cloud and reviewing the content library.

  1. Click the + icon on the browser to open a new tab.
  2. Click the Address Bar in the browser.
  3. Enter https://rack-1-vc-1.pao01.demo.vmware.com/vsphere-client into the address bar.
  4. Click the Arrow Icon on the browser.
  5. Enter admninistrator@vsphere.local in the User Name field.
  6. Click the Password field and the password will auto populate.
  7. Click Login.
  8. In the vSphere Web Client click on Content Libraries.

    We see that two content libraries have been created in the private cloud.
  9. Management-PAO-01 for the use in the Management Domain
  10. TMM-PAO-01 used to organize and distribute content used by workloads and automation.
  11. Click on the TMM-PAO-01 Content Library.

    Here we see that the content library is hosted on the a vSAN datastore and consumes 76.22 GB of storage.
  12. Click on Related Objects to review the items in the library.

Here we see that 4 templates are contained within the library.

 

  1. Click on Other Types to see additional content items that have been imported into the content library.

    Here we see that both customization specs (cs- objects) and ISOs (iso- objects) have also been added into the content library.
  2. Click on Manage.

    Here we see that the content library has been configured to be published to any subscriber with the Subscription URL.
  3. Click Copy Link to copy the Subscription URL to the clipboard.

    Now that we have the Subscription URL for the content library in the private cloud, we will create and subscribe a content library in the public cloud
  4. Click the browser tab labeled vSphere Web Client to connect to our vCenter Server instance running on the IBM Cloud.
  5. In the vSphere Web Client click on Content Libraries.

    We see that presantly, there are no content libraries configured in the public cloud.
  6. Click the New Content Library Icon.
  7. In the Name field, enter BMX-SJC-01.
  8. In the Notes field, enter Content library in IBM Bluemix synced from on-premises and click Next.
  9. Select the radio button next to Subscribed Content Library.
  10. Click in the Subscription URL field and the URL will auto-populate  (this is the subscription URL for the content library being shared from our on-premesis vCenter Server Instance that we looked at earlier).

    Note that the option to Download all library content immediately is checked by default.  If we didn't want to download the entire library, we could choose the option to only download content when needed.
  11. Click Next.
  12. Click Yes to trust the SSL Thumbprint of the subscription host.
  13. Click the radio button for vsanDatastore as the storage location for the library contents.

Note that In this example we are usign the vSAN data store as an example.  There is no requirement to save the content library on vSAN.  You could just as easily choose an NFS or iSCI datastore,  assuming of course you have IP based storage avaialble in your environment.

  1. Click Next.
  2. Review the new content library settings and click Finish to complete the subscryption.
  3. Click Recent Tasks at the bottom of the vSphere Web Client to view the progress of the content library synchonrization.

    The content library has been created on our public cloud vCenter Server instance is it's content synchronnized with our private cloud vCenter Server instance.
  4. Click Recent Tasks again to close the tasks.
  5. Click on the new BMX-SJC-01 content library.

    Here we see that the content library is hosted on the a vSAN datastore and consumes 77.37 GB of storage.
  6. Click on Related Objects to review the items in the library synced from the private cloud.

Here we see that 4 templates are contained within the library.

This completes the steps for creating and synchronizing the Content Library in the public cloud.  Next, we will show how to export the templates in the content library so they can be consumed by vRealize Automation.

  1. With the os-lnx-centos-7-x64 template already highlighted, click the Actions.
  2. Select New VM from This Template.
  3. Click the SDDC-Datacenter datacenter object.
  4. Click the Templates folder object as the destination for the template.
  5. Click Next.
  6. Click the SDDC-Cluster cluster object as the destination resource.
  7. Click Next.
  8. Review the template details and click Next.
  9. Click the dropdown for the VM Storage Policy and select Virtual SAN Default Storage Policy  (note the default vSAN storage policy was created for us by SDDC Manager when we deployed Cloud Foundation on the IBM Cloud).
  10. Click the radio button for vsanDatastore as the storage location for the template.
  11. Click Next.
  12. Click the dropdown for the Destination Network.
  13. Click Browse to select a destination network for the template.
  14. Select the network labeled vxw-dvs-9-virtualwire-7-sid-5-5005-Templates to select the NSX Logical Switch.
  15. Click OK.
  16. Click Next.
  17. Review the template configuration data and click Finish to complete the creation.
  18. Click Recent Tasks at the bottom of the vSphere Web Client to view the status of the template.

    Here we see that the OVF template stored in the content library has been deployed to a VM.  We will now use this newely deployed VM to create a template.  As part of the template creation process let's first export the Linux customization file that we will use for this template to our local desktop.
  19. Click Recent Tasks again to close the tasks.
  20. Click the Other Types in the Related Objects section.

Here we see the list of available customization specs that were  synchronized.

  1. Click cs-os-lnx-centos.xml and then click Actions.
  2. Click Export Item.
  3. Click Browse.
  4. Click Select Folder to save the customization specification to the Desktop.
  5. Click OK to export the item.

With the VM we will use for the template created and the customization spec saved to our desktop we're now ready to convert the VM into a template.

  1. Click the Home Icon in the vSphere Web Client.
  2. Click VMs and Templates.

    Here we see that the os-lnx-centos-7-x64 virtual machine is located in the folder we previously specified.
  3. Click on the os-lnx-centos-7-x64 template.
  4. Click on Actions  Template  Convert to Template.
  5. Click Yes to convert the os-lnx-centos-7-x64virtual machine to a template.

    Note that the virtual machine has changed to a template as indicated by the new icon.  Next we will import the customization spec so it can be used with this template.
  6. Click the Home Icon in the vSphere Web Client.
  7. Click Policies and Profiles.
  8. Click the Import Customization Specification icon.
  9. Select the cs-os-lnx-centos.xml folder on the desktop.
  10. Select the cs-os-lnx-centos XML Document and click Open.

    The customization specification has now been added to the public cloud.

    Note that we've gone ahead and added the rest of the templates and customization specification for you as you'll see them later in this interactive simulation.

 

 

We're done with our vSphere setup.

  1. Click the Home Icon in the vSphere Web Client.
  2. Click the Hosts and Clusters.

We see the contents of our vSphere cluster running on the IBM cloud.  Note that currently, there ae no VMs running in the Compute-ResourcePool.  Next, we'll switch over to vRealize Automation and go over the steps to build a blue print in vRealize Automation, using the template we just created, and how to deploy workload VMs onto our public cloud.

 

 

Preparing vRealize Automation to Extend to the VMware Cloud Foundation on IBM Cloud.

In this portion of the lab, we will show how to extend the organization's implementation of vRealize Automation to include the VMware Cloud Foundation endpoint running on the IBM Cloud.  We'll then show how to create and deploy our first blueprint into the public cloud.

  1. Click the + icon on the browser to open a new tab.
  2. Click the Address Bar in the browser.
  3. Enter https://cloud.demo.vmware.com/vcac/org/vmware into the address bar.
  4. Click the Arrow Icon on the browser.
  5. Click Next to set the domain as demo.vmware.com.
  6. Click the Username field and enter ryan.
  7. Click the Password field and enter VMware123!.
  8. Click Sign-In.
  9. Click Catalog to view the self-service catalog for the organization.

    We are logged into vRealize Automation as the Cloud Architect where we see the list of  blueprints that are available.  However, these blueprints are only available to be deployed to their private cloud.  To deploy these blueprints to the new public cloud instance of Cloud Foundation instance running on the IBM cloud we need to configure the public cloud as a new endpoint and setup a reservation.  Details on how to perform these steps are outside the scope of this lab.  However, they are summaraized below:

Install vRA Proxy Agent to the Public cloud:  To extend the on-premises instance of vRealize Automation so it can deploy workloads to our public cloud we first installed a vRealize Automation proxy agent.  This agent is used by vRealize Automation to communicate with the vCenter Server instance running in the public cloud to perform work and report status.

Setup a sevice account with the correct privelages:  We also configured a service account (vra.service@demo.vmware.com) with the required permissions needed to access to both the vCenter Server and NSX Manager instances.  Consult the vRealize Automation documentation for more information.

Add the Public Cloud as a vRealize Endpoint and configure fabric and resource groups:  Finally we login to vRealize Automation and add our public cloud vCenter Server and NSX Manager instances as an endpoints.  When we add the endpoints we also setup fabric groups, configure resources, and configure reservations.

<insert screen shot showing public cloud endpoints>

Creating a vRealize Automation Blueprint to Consume to New Public Cloud Resources in IBM Cloud.

In this portion of the interactive simulation, we pick up after the deployment of the vRA Proxy Agent and the configuration of the public cloud Endpoint.  

With our public cloud endpoints added to our on-premesis vRealize Automation instance we are now able to deploy workloads to the public cloud.  To do this we first create blueprints.  In these blueprints we will use the templates and customization specification files from the content library, which we synchronized earlier.

  1. Click on the Design Tab.
  2. In the Blueprints section, click New.
  3. Click the Name field and enter 3 Tier App Base on Bluemix.
  4. Click the Description field and enter 3 Tier App Base Formation.
  5. Click OK.

First, we will add three networks.  One for each tier:  Web, App and Database

  1. In the Categories of the design canvas, click Network and Security then click Existing Network.
  2. Click the Ellipse Box and select the Development Web  172.21.1.0/24 network profile.
  3. Click OK.
  4. Click the Down Arrow in the middle of the design canvas.
  5. In the Categories of the design canvas, click Existing Network again.
  6. Click the Ellipse Box and select the Development App  172.21.2.0/24 network profile.
  7. Click OK.
  8. In the Categories of the design canvas, click Existing Network once more.
  9. Click the Ellipse Box and select the Development Database  172.21.3.0/24 network profile.
  10. Click OK.

Next, we select the virtual machine templates we will use.  Again, we do this for each tier: Web, App and Database.  Note that we will use the template and customization specification file that we setup earlier.

First we setup the template and custom spec for the web tier:

  1. Click the Down Arrow in the middle of the design canvas.
  2. In the Categories of the design canvas, click Machine Types then click the down arrow in the scroll bar..
  3. Click vSphere (vCenter) Machine.
  4. Click the ID* field and enter Web-Tier.
  5. Click the Description field and enter Web-Tier.
  6. Click the Reservation Policy dropdown and select Development.
  7. Click the Machine Prefix dropdown and select dev-web-.
  8. Click the arrows in under Maximum until the value is 4.
  9. Click the Build Information tab.
  10. Click the Action dropdown and select Clone.
  11. Click the Ellipse Box in the Clone From and select the os-lnx-cento-7-x64.
  12. Click OK.
  13. Click Customization Spec and enter os-lnx-centos.
  14. Click Machine Resources.
  15. Click the arrows in under Maximum for CPUs until the value is 4.
  16. Click the textbox in under Maximum for Memory and enter 16384.
  17. Click the textbox in under Maximum for Disk and enter 100.
  18. Click Network followed by New.
  19. Click the Network dropdown and select DevelopmentWeb172211024.
  20. Click OK.

Notice how as we build the blue print, the designer UI graphically depicts the blueprint.  In this case we the Web-Tier virtual machine we just defined that is connected to the DevelopmentWeb network we specified.

Next, we repeat this these steps to setup the template and custom spec for the app tier:

  1. Click the Down Arrow in the middle of the design canvas.
  2. Click vSphere (vCenter) Machine.
  3. Click the ID* field and enter App-Tier.
  4. Click the Description field and enter App-Tier.
  5. Click the Reservation Policy dropdown and select Development.
  6. Click the Machine Prefix dropdown and select dev-app-.
  7. Click the arrows in under Maximum until the value is 4.
  8. Click the Build Information tab.
  9. Click the Action dropdown and select Clone.
  10. Click the Ellipse Box in the Clone From and select the os-lnx-cento-7-x64.
  11. Click OK.
  12. Click Customization Spec and enter os-lnx-centos.
  13. Click Machine Resources.
  14. Click the arrows in under Maximum for CPUs until the value is 4.
  15. Click the textbox in under Maximum for Memory and enter 16384.
  16. Click the textbox in under Maximum for Disk and enter 100.
  17. Click Network followed by New.
  18. Click the Network dropdown and select DevelopmentApp172212024.
  19. Click OK.

Finally,  we repeat these steps a third time to setup the template and custom spec for the DB tier:

  1. Click the Down Arrow in the middle of the design canvas.
  2. Click vSphere (vCenter) Machine.
  3. Click the ID* field and enter DB-Tier.
  4. Click the Description field and enter DB-Tier.
  5. Click the Reservation Policy dropdown and select Development.
  6. Click the Machine Prefix dropdown and select dev-db-.
  7. Click the arrows in under Maximum until the value is 2.
  8. Click the Build Information tab.
  9. Click the Action dropdown and select Clone.
  10. Click the Ellipse Box in the Clone From and select the os-lnx-cento-7-x64.
  11. Click OK.
  12. Click Customization Spec and enter os-lnx-centos.
  13. Click Machine Resources.
  14. Click the arrows in under Maximum for CPUs until the value is 4.
  15. Click the textbox in under Maximum for Memory and enter 16384.
  16. Click the textbox in under Maximum for Disk and enter 100.
  17. Click Network followed by New.
  18. Click the Network dropdown and select DevelopmentDatabase172213024.
  19. Click OK.
  20. Click the Down Arrow in the middle of the design canvas.
  21. Click Finish.

Here we can see that our new base blueprint for a 3-tier app has been created in our Cloud Management Portal. The blueprint is consuming the template and customization specifications synced from private cloud to the public cloud.

With the blueprint created, the next step is to publish it.  

  1. On the Blueprints select the 3 Tier App Base on Bluemix blueprint.
  2. Click Publish.

The blueprint has been published. Now, let’s entitle it to our development business group under a new service labeled IBM Bluemix.

  1. Click the Administration tab.
  2. Click Catalog Management.
  3. Click Catalog Items.
  4. Select the 3 Tier App Base on Bluemix item.
  5. Click Browse to select black and white icon.  (this is the icon that will represent this blueprint in the catalog)
  6. Click Open.
  7. Click the Down Arrow on the scroll bar.
  8. Click the Service dropdown and select IBM Bluemix.
  9. Click OK.

The new blueprint is entitled to our development team and is ready to be deployed.  Let’s test by deploying an instance of this 3-tier app in our public cloud powered by VMware Cloud Foundation on IBM Cloud.

  1. Click Catalog.

Note, we now see a new section in our Service Catalog for IBM Bluemix.

  1. Click IBM Bluemix.
  2. Click the 3 Tier App Base on Bluemix blueprint to Request a deployment in the public cloud.
  3. Click on Web-Tier.
  4. Click the arrows next to Instances until the value is 4.
  5. Click the arrows next to CPUs until the value is 3.
  6. Click the textbox next to Memory and enter 4096.
  7. Click on App-Tier.
  8. Click the arrows next to Instances until the value is 4.
  9. Click the arrows next to CPUs until the value is 4.
  10. Click the textbox next to Memory and enter 16384.
  11. Click on DB-Tier.
  12. Click the arrows next to Instances until the value is 2.
  13. Click the arrows next to CPUs until the value is 4.
  14. Click the textbox next to Memory and enter 16382.
  15. Click the 3 Tier App Base on Bluemix.
  16. Click Description and enter 3 Tier App Base Formation Test on Bluemix.
  17. Click Submit.
  18. Click OK.

Our request has been submitted.   vRealize Automation will now communicate with the VMware Cloud Foundation instance running on the IBM Cloud to provision the requested blueprint.

We can logon to our vCenter Server instance and monitor the progress and watch as the VMs are deployed in our public cloud.

  1. Click the vSphere Web Client tab in the browser.
  2. Click Recent Tasks at the bottom of the vSphere Web Client to view the status of the request.

Here we see that the vRealize Automation has cloned, powered on, and customized the os-lnx-centos-7-x64 templates. Let’s check the state of the request.

  1. Click Recent Tasks again to close the tasks.
  2. Here we see that the following virtual machines have been deployed:

Let’s review each of the new virtual machines and check their state.

  1. Click on dev-web-001.

Here we see that the Web-Tier has 3 CPUs and 4GB of memory as requested. It’s also been deployed on an NSX Logical Switch for Development Web and has been provisioned an IP Address of 172.21.1.12 from vRealize Automation.

  1. Click on dev-web-002, dev-web-003 and dev-web-004 and review this information for each.  Notice that they all have the same configuration, which is to be expected.
  2. Click on dev-app-001.

Here we see that the App-Tier has 4 CPUs and 16GB of memory as requested. It’s also been deployed on an NSX Logical Switch for Development App and has been provisioned an IP Address of 172.21.2.12 from vRealize Automation.

  1. Click on dev-app-002, dev-app-003 and dev-app-004 to verify that they have the same configuration.
  2. Click on dev-db-001.

Here we see that the DB-Tier has 4CPUs and 16GB of memory as requested. It’s also been deployed on an NSX Logical Switch for Development Database and has been provisioned an IP Address of 172.21.3.11 from vRealize Automation.

  1. Click on dev-app-002 to see if it has the same configuration.
  2. Click the Home Icon in the vSphere Web Client.
  3. Click Home

This concludes our interactive simulation on extending vRealize Automation to the public cloud using VMware Cloud Foundation on the IBM Cloud.  In this lab we have covered a lot.  We showed:

1.  How to leverage the vSphere Content Library to synchronize virtual machine templates and customization files across the hybrid cloud.

2.  How extend our existing, on-premesis instance of vRealize Automation so it can be used with VMware Cloud Foundation instance running on the IBM Cloud.

3.  How to create blueprints in vRealize Automation for use with VMware Cloud Foundation instance running on the IBM Cloud.

4.  How to deploy blueprints into VMware Cloud Foundation instance running on the IBM Cloud.

 

Conclusion


In this module you walked through how to setup a content catalog and setup vRealize for the hybrid cloud.

 

Congratulations on completing  Module 3

If you are looking for additional information on Cloud Foundation in the Public Cloud, try one of these:

Proceed to any module below which interests you most.

 


 

How to End Lab

 

To end your lab click on the END button.  

 

Module 4 - Expanding Public Cloud Capacity (15 minutes)

Introduction


As we have seen, getting started with Cloud Foundation on IBM Blue mix is easy. But what happens when you need more capacity. Here again we are able to leverage the capabilities of the IBM Cloud together with the automation capabilities of the SDDC Manager to quickly, and seamlessly expand our cloud capacity.

 

Adding an additional server to an existing Cloud Foundation involves adding the new server to the cluster and then updating the cluster, vSAN, VDS and NSX settings to account for the additional host.

The process begins by logging into the IBM Portal and requesting additional capacity. IBM Cloud will install and cable the new server and then call out to SDDC Manager to perform the required configurations within vSphere, vSAN and NSX to incorporate the new capacity. Its quick and seamless.


Hands-on Labs Interactive Simulation: Expanding Public Cloud Capacity


This interactive simulation walks you through

  1. How to request additional capacity for your Cloud Foundation instance running in the IBM Cloud

The interactive simulation will allow you to experience steps which are too time-consuming or resource intensive to do live in the lab environment.

  1. Click here to open the interactive simulation. It will open in a new browser window or tab.
  2. When finished, click the “Return to the lab” link to continue with this lab.

Conclusion


In this module you expanded the vCF by adding a host through the SDDC Manager

 

Congratulations on completing  Module 4.

If you are looking for additional information on Cloud Foundation in the Public Cloud, try one of these:

Proceed to any module below which interests you most.

 


 

How to End Lab

 

To end your lab click on the END button.  

 

Module 5 - Apply Software Updates in the Public Cloud (15 minutes)

Introduction


Once you deploy your Cloud Foundation infrastructure there will inevitably be software updates that need to be applied. Historically, keeping up-to-date on software updates has proven very difficult for IT teams. However, with Cloud Foundation the process for applying software updates, both in the private cloud and public cloud is vastly simplified.

 

 

In this module, we show how easy it is to update the entire SDDC software stack by leveraging the automation provided by the SDDC Manager in the IBM Cloud.


Interactive Simulation: Apply Software Updates in the Public Cloud


This interactive simulation walks you through

  1. How to apply a software update to your VCF instanc running on the IBM Cloud

The interactive simulation will allow you to experience steps which are too time-consuming or resource intensive to do live in the lab environment.

  1. Click here to open the interactive simulation. It will open in a new browser window or tab.
  2. When finished, click the “Return to the lab” link to continue with this lab.

Conclusion


In this module you were given an overview of how to apply a software updates to your VMware Cloud Foundation instance running on the IBM Cloud

 

Congratulations on completing  Module 5.

If you are looking for additional information on Cloud Foundation in the Public Cloud, try one of these:

Proceed to any module below which interests you most.

 


 

How to End Lab

 

To end your lab click on the END button.  

 

Module 6 - Security & Compliance Automation on IBM Cloud with HyTrust (15 minutes)

Introduction


Working together, VMware and IBM make it easy to get started with the hybrid cloud. With the VMware Cloud Foundation solution on IBM Cloud, customers can easily deploy the same standardized software-defined data center solution that they run in their on-premises data center on top of their leased Bluemix infrastructure to enable a seamless hybrid cloud experience.

As with any cloud environment security is always paramount and together IBM and VMware have partnered with HyTrust to provide a robust security solution uniquely well suited for your VMware Cloud Foundation-based hybrid cloud.

 

IBM Cloud Secure Virtualization leverages technology from HyTrust and Intel, to address security and compliance issues for sensitive VMware workloads, breaking down barriers to cloud adoption and allowing organizations to more confidently leverage the efficiency, agility and scalability of the cloud. 

In this module, we will look at two of the HyTrust security services available as part of your VMware Cloud Foundation solution on IBM Cloud: 

 

 

There are two demos included in this module:

Working together, VMware, IBM, and HyTrust enable you to increase your hybrid-cloud security posture while simultaneously embracing compliance automation.  Run your sensitive VMware workloads and leverage the clouds key benefits without worrying about security and compliance.


Interactive Simulation: Security & Compliance Automation on IBM Cloud with HyTrust


This interactive simulation walks you through

  1. How to use HyTrust BoundaryControl to limit where virtual machines can run in your Cloud Foundation-based hybrid cloud.   By leveraging the portable encryption controls of HyTrust, vSphere is able to check with the HyTrust policy engine to determine when and where decryption of virtual machines is permitted, thus enabling IT admins to restrict where virtual machines can run in the hybrid cloud.  
  2. How to use HyTrust DataControl to enforce Host security attestation.  By definition, workloads in the hybrid cloud are mobile and can move often, and sometimes to hosts that  may not be trusted. HyTrust DataControl integrates with HyTrust CloudControl to leverage Intel’s TXT (Trusted Execution Technology) to provide proof of a host’s security state. With this capability, administrators can set policy and determine what to do if a workload is moved onto a host that does not have the appropriate level of security desired, such as automatically unmounting a mapped drive.

The interactive simulation will allow you to experience steps which are too time-consuming or resource intensive to do live in the lab environment.

  1. Click here to open the interactive simulation. It will open in a new browser window or tab.
  2. When finished, click the “Return to the lab” link to continue with this lab.

Conclusion


In this module you saw how Cloud Foundation together with HyTrust Workload Security Solutions enables IT to secure workloads in the cloud and reduce risks associated with hybrid cloud mobility by automating compliance and enforcing security-based policies across private and public clouds

 

Congratulations on completing  Module 6.

If you are looking for additional information on Cloud Foundation in the Public Cloud, try one of these:

Proceed to any module below which interests you most.

 


 

How to End Lab

 

To end your lab click on the END button.  

 

Conclusion

Thank you for participating in the VMware Hands-on Labs. Be sure to visit http://hol.vmware.com/ to continue your lab experience online.

Lab SKU: HOL-1844-02-SLN

Version: 20170815-132022