VMware Hands-on Labs - HOL-1821-03-CMP


Lab Overview - HOL-1821-03-CMP - vRealize Automation 7 - Advanced Extensibility

Lab Guidance


Note: It will take more than 90 minutes to complete this lab. You should expect to only finish 2-3 of the modules during your time.  The modules are independent of each other so you can start at the beginning of any module and proceed from there. You can use the Table of Contents to access any module of your choosing.

The Table of Contents can be accessed in the upper right-hand corner of the Lab Manual.

Lab Module List:

 Lab Captains:

 

This lab manual can be downloaded from the Hands-on Labs Document site found here:

http://docs.hol.vmware.com

This lab may be available in other languages.  To set your language preference and have a localized manual deployed with your lab, you may utilize this document to help guide you through the process:

http://docs.hol.vmware.com/announcements/nee-default-language.pdf


 

Introduction to the Scenario

 

Rainpole Systems is an electronics manufacturer located in Palo Alto, CA.  Rainpole designs and manufactures electronic devices for use in everything from aircraft instrumentation to home automation.  Given the diversity of their product set, Rainpole needs to develop cloud-based IT services to support the increasing demands of the business units.

Rainpole Systems is planning to use vRealize Automation to begin their journey towards providing cloud-based IT services. The IT department has been tasked with finding a way to cut the time needed to provision individual virtual machines for development and quality assurance teams, but also to help the network teams speed up the provisioning of network infrastructure using NSX. In addition, the developers are interested in exploring their options for provisioning applications, both through their existing investment in external configuration management systems and through native vRealize Automation capabilities.

The line of business owners inside of Rainpole Systems are also keenly interested in maintaining their visibility into the lifecycle of the infrastructure that is provisioned through their IT Service Management tools.

As the Rainpole IT Department adopts this new model of cloud computing, they will also need a way to troubleshoot and diagnose any problems that may arise in the new infrastructure.

You will take on the roles of a Rainpole Cloud Administrator, a Rainpole Developer and a Development Manager in this exciting lab exercise to experience how VMware and vRealize Automation can help make these goals a reality.

 

 

Location of the Main Console

 

  1. The area in the RED box contains the Main Console.  The Lab Manual is on the tab to the Right of the Main Console.
  2. A particular lab may have additional consoles found on separate tabs in the upper left. You will be directed to open another specific console if needed.
  3. Your lab starts with 90 minutes on the timer.  The lab can not be saved.  All your work must be done during the lab session.  But you can click the EXTEND to increase your time.  If you are at a VMware event, you can extend your lab time twice, for up to 30 minutes.  Each click gives you an additional 15 minutes.  Outside of VMware events, you can extend your lab time up to 9 hours and 30 minutes. Each click gives you an additional hour.

 

 

Browser Zoom

 

Due to screen resolutions in the labs, some screenshots have been optimized by using the zoom feature in Chrome.  Please use the + and buttons in the browser to optimize the screen to your preference.

  1. Click the settings button
  2. Adjust the screen using the + or - buttons

 

 

Alternate Methods of Keyboard Data Entry

During this module, you will input text into the Main Console. Besides directly typing it in, there are two very helpful methods of entering data which make it easier to enter complex data.

 

 

Click and Drag Lab Manual Content Into Console Active Window

You can also click and drag text and Command Line Interface (CLI) commands directly from the Lab Manual into the active window in the Main Console.  

 

 

Accessing the Online International Keyboard

 

You can also use the Online International Keyboard found in the Main Console.

  1. Click on the Keyboard Icon found on the Windows Quick Launch Task Bar.

 

 

Click once in active console window

 

In this example, you will use the Online Keyboard to enter the "@" sign used in email addresses. The "@" sign is Shift-2 on US keyboard layouts.

  1. Click once in the active console window.
  2. Click on the Shift key.

 

 

Click on the @ key

 

  1. Click on the "@" key.

Notice the @ sign entered in the active console window.

 

 

Activation Prompt or Watermark

 

When you first start your lab, you may notice a watermark on the desktop indicating that Windows is not activated.  

One of the major benefits of virtualization is that virtual machines can be moved and run on any platform.  The Hands-on Labs utilizes this benefit and we are able to run the labs out of multiple datacenters.  However, these datacenters may not have identical processors, which triggers a Microsoft activation check through the Internet.

Rest assured, VMware and the Hands-on Labs are in full compliance with Microsoft licensing requirements.  The lab that you are using is a self-contained pod and does not have full access to the Internet, which is required for Windows to verify the activation.  Without full access to the Internet, this automated process fails and you see this watermark.

This cosmetic issue has no effect on your lab.  

 

 

Look at the lower right portion of the screen

 

Please check to see that your lab is finished all the startup routines and is ready for you to start. If you see anything other than "Ready", please wait a few minutes.  If after 5 minutes your lab has not changed to "Ready", please ask for assistance.

 

Module 1 - Introduction to Extensibility (30 minutes)

Introduction


This module will explore the limitless flexibility that extensibility brings to vRealize Automation, and explain the different ways you can implement and leverage it to streamline and automate complex processes.

This HOL-1821-03-CMP lab is broken up into 5 individual modules with varying lengths. Use the "Modules" list to determine which use case(s) you want to complete. You may choose to complete any or all modules, keeping in mind you have 90 minutes available per session.

If you have not already reviewed it, the Lab Introduction contains details about Rainpole Systems (our example company,) as well as important information on text entry, multiple language support and on-screen keyboard configuration. If desired, you can click here to review this information again.

In this module you will act as the cloud admin and a developer for Rainpole to configure and deploy a WordPress application.

You will need about 30 minutes to complete this module.


Introduction to Extensibility


Automation isn't a new technology - it's a new way of thinking about existing processes and combining them with existing technologies. The goal of automation is to allow these existing investments to be leveraged while enforcing a policy-based model of lifecycle and governance to ensure they can be consumed in a repeatable fashion. VMware's vRealize Automation does just that - provide a framework for IT organizations to connect into their existing investments in infrastructure, asset management, business process management and others while maintaining a governance model.


 

What is Extensibility?

Extensibility is the ability to extend the functionality of a system without affecting the structure or code of the system.

In vRealize Automation, this means to extend the functionality of the product to integrate with existing processes and infrastructure.  For example, anyone can take a VM template and deploy consistent VM's from that template.  What is missing from this process is the ability to integrate with existing systems, such as CMDB, ITSM, and IP Address Management (IPAM) applications.

 

 

How is this Different from Customization?

As we discussed earlier, extensibility extends the functionality of a system within a provided framework, and without affecting the structure or code of the system.  Customizations are generally built outside of a standard framework, and may cause issues with supportability and upgradability.

vRealize Automation is unique in that some of the features that would require customization in other products can be achieved through configuration changes or event subscriptions, leveraging vRealize Orchestrator and its many available plug-ins for both VMware and third party tools.

 

 

Extensibility Options in vRealize Automation 7

vRealize Automation 7 has the following options for extending functionality beyond simple virtual machine deployment:

 

 

Event Broker

 

One of the most exciting new features in vRealize Automation 7 is the ability to use the Event Broker to monitor the vRealize Automation Message Queue for events, each of which can drive extensibility actions. These drivers, or Subscriptions, can be monitored for one or many matches to hundreds of different characteristics, allowing for unparalleled flexibility when driving custom actions. These Subscriptions can also be specified as Blocking events, which would allow an external system to take action before the vRealize Automation request or event can continue.

We will explore the Event Broker in greater detail in the modules that follow in this lab.

 

 

Anything as a Service (XaaS)

 

XaaS, formerly known as Advanced Service Designer, brings new features and capabilities to vRealize Automation 7.

With XaaS, anything that can be automated through a vRealize Orchestrator workflow can be presented and consumed as service, opening a world of possibilities to extend vRealize Automation - the sky's the limit! The most powerful new feature is the ability to leverage XaaS in the converged blueprint designer. Now you can simply drag and drop XaaS blueprints from the library directly onto the Design Canvas to create complex blueprints in minutes.

 

 

Custom Properties

Properties are used to control certain aspects of the provisioning process.  Some properties are determined by standard settings that you must specify for all machines. For example, memory and disk size values are required for all blueprints. You can specify additional properties individually or in property groups in blueprints and in reservations. Use custom properties to add values or override existing or default values for the following information:

Custom properties can be marked as required properties.  When a property is specified as required, the user or system must supply a value for that property when the machine is requested.  One example of this may be to mandate that an accounting code be entered prior to requesting a machine.

 

 

Adding Custom Properties

 

Custom properties can be defined individually or in property groups that can be applied to various objects in the system.  Properly authorized users can specify custom properties for blueprints, endpoints, business groups, and reservations.  Within blueprints, properties can be added to the blueprint itself or to the individual components within a blueprint.  Blueprint-level custom properties take precedence over custom properties that are configured at the component level.

The picture above shows a few properties that might be defined for a machine deployment.  This is for demonstration purposes only.  You will define some properties later in this module.

  1. Values for the property can be defined at creation.
  2. Values for the property can be defined at the time of request by the user.

 

 

Custom Property Precedence

When the same property exists in more than one source, vRealize Automation follows a specific order of precedence when applying properties to the machine.

You can add custom properties that apply to provisioned machines to the following elements:

The following list shows the order of precedence for custom properties. A Property value specified in a source that appears later in the list override values for the same property specified in sources that appear earlier in the list.

As you can see, a runtime property takes precedence over other properties.  A runtime property meets the following conditions:

 

 

Custom Property Types

The following vRealize Automation custom property types are available:

 

 

Learn More

 

To learn more about custom properties and to explore the built-in custom properties, please scan the QR code above or go to the following link.

Custom Properties Reference for vRealize Automation 7.3
http://bit.ly/2sUYvGp

 

Introducing the Event Broker


Lifecycle extensibility has always been a critical feature of vRealize Automation. In past versions of the product this has only been available for IaaS lifecycle states, but not for Advanced Services Designer provisioning (now known as XaaS) or the Approval process.  

Enter the vRealize Automation 7 Event Broker !

In this module, we will review:


 

What is the Event Broker?

 

Event Broker is a centrally managed, simplified subscription based model for extending the complete provisioning lifecycle for Converged Blueprints in vRealize Automation 7, AND several other key services such as Approvals.  Through the vRealize Automation Administration UI, you can now configure criteria-based subscriptions for an extended list of Event Topics and conditions, and assign a vRealize Orchestrator workflow to be called.  

This is no longer done blueprint by blueprint, but instead can be based on broader conditions configured as part of the subscription process (such as by event lifecycle state name and phase, machine type, blueprint name, custom property, and many other possibilities).  It also means that a single event could trigger multiple vRealize Orchestrator workflows without having to create a "wrapper" workflow!

 

 

Event Broker Use Cases

 

Past versions of vRealize Automation allowed administrators to use the IaaS SDK and/or vRealize Orchestrator workflow stubs to customize the machine provisioning lifecycle.  These were critical for common use cases including custom host naming, IPAM integrations, creating Active Directory (AD) accounts, adding machine objects to custom AD OUs, joining machines to domains, updating CMDB with new or updated machine details, and reversing all of this when a machine was decomissioned. While these types of extensions were critical in most vRealize Automation implementations, there were some use cases that could not be addressed in vRealize Automation 6.x, such as extensibility for managed objects created though the Advanced Service Designer (known as XaaS in vRealize Automation 7) and for customizing the Approval process.

Within this module, we will be exploring two key use cases:

 

 

Event Topics

 

With the new Event Broker, the integration points have expanded beyond the original six IaaS workflow states to Event Topics which can be broadly applied based on a variety of Conditions, rather than assigned to each blueprint.  There are now nine broad Event Topics, shown above, which describe the type of event message sent to a specific vRealize Automation Service.

Event topics, described below, allow events to be triggered by other vRealize Automation services and sent to the Event Broker.  Machine Lifecycle and Machine Provisioning are certainly the two you will use most frequently!

  1. Blueprint component completed - A blueprint component that is part of a composite blueprint finishes provisioning. The component is any blueprint that is part of a composite blueprint.
  2. Blueprint component requested - A blueprint component that is part of a composite blueprint is requested. The component is any blueprint that is part of a composite blueprint.
  3. Blueprint configuration - A blueprint is created, updated, or deleted.
  4. Business group configuration - A business group is created, updated, or deleted.
  5. Catalog item request completed - A composite blueprint finished provisioning. This event topic includes all blueprint components. It does not include standalone XaaS blueprints.
  6. Catalog item requested - A composite blueprint is requested. This event topic does not includeXaaSblueprints.
  7. Component action completed - An action run on a deployed blueprint component when a deployment action was requested.
  8. Component action requested - An action to run on a deployed blueprint component is requested when a deployment action was requested.
  9. Deployment action completed - An action on a deployed blueprint finished running, including running all the component actions.
  10. Deployment action requested - An action on a deployed blueprint is requested.
  11. EventLog default event - A standard entry is added to the event log.
  12. IPAM IP lifecycle event completion - An IP allocation or deallocation request is finished.
  13. Machine lifecycle - A provided IaaS action is run on a provisioned machine.
  14. Machine provisioning - An IaaS machine is in the process of being provisioned.
  15. Orchestration server configuration - A vRealize Orchestrator server configuration is created, updated, deleted, or modified to use a different default instance.
  16. Post Approval - A post-approval policy level is configured to use the event subscription option.
  17. Pre Approval - A pre-approval policy level is configured to use the event subscription option.
  18. Resource reclamation completion event - A resource lease expired and the resources are reclaimed.

As you can see, these are very broad topics!  We will review how to make our event triggers more granular using conditions as we dig a little deeper in just a bit.

NOTE: All subscriptions are Tenant specific!  

 

 

Blocking and Non-Blocking Events

 

There are two special types of Event Topics you must be aware of before we start trying to set up subscriptions in vRealize Automation - Blocking and Replyable Event Topics - and how they compare to standard, non-blocking event topics.

 

 

Pre and Post Event State Phase

 

The Event State Phase you use when setting up your Subscription conditions will impact how the workflow return values are processed.

Error/timeout behavior is configurable for each state by the following custom properties on the machine:

 

 

Using Workflow Output Parameters

 

Workflow output parameters can be used, as the previous table indicates, to allow Blocking subscriptions to alter the Request.  Above are some examples of ways that a Request can be modified.  The use cases we will review in this module include:

 

 

Event State Timeouts

 

There is a global default configuration for extensibility workflows to timeout after 30 minutes.  This global default can be adjusted as needed, under Infrastructure > Administration > Global Settings.  

This can be overridden per Subscription, as you will see when we start setting them up!

 

Exploring Event Subscriptions


We will explore the topic of Event Subscriptions in vRealize Automation 7 in a bit more detail. Let's start by getting logged in as the cloud administrator.  Other users will not have access to the Events menu in the UI.

It's worth noting that the following pre-requisites are already set up for you:

 


 

Open Chrome Browser from Windows Quick Launch Task Bar

 

  1. Click on the Chrome Icon on the Windows Quick Launch Task Bar.

 

 

Log in to vRealize Automation

 

  1. Enter cloudadmin for the username
  2. Enter VMware1! for the password
  3. Click Sign In

 

 

Navigate to Event Subscriptions

 

We will start by locating the Subscriptions configuration:

  1. Click on the Administration tab
  2. Choose Events from the left hand navigation (not pictured)
  3. Select Subscriptions to show table of existing subscriptions
  4. Click the New button

 

 

Zoom Out Browser

 

Due to limitations of the lab environment's screen resolution we will use the zoom feature of the browser to zoom out.

  1. Select the configuration menu in Chrome
  2. Click on the - twice to zoom out to 80%

 

 

Select Event Topic

 

The first step of setting up a new subscription is to choose the Event Topic you will use.  As was mentioned in the introduction section, Machine Provisioning and Machine Lifecycle are the two you will likely use the most.  

  1. Click on the different Event Topics in the list, for this example choose Machine Provisioning
  2. You will see details about that topic displayed on the right side
  3. Note that the Schema view is particularly helpful
  4. Click Next button

 

 

Selecting Conditions

 

Because Event Subscriptions are tenant-wide, planning ahead and choosing proper conditions for each subscription is critical!  By default, the Run for all Events radio button is selected. If you leave this, you will be firing your workflow MANY times! This is because the event will trigger for each combination of Lifecycle State and Phase (Pre and Post).  The number of Lifecycle States will vary between different Event Topics, but all will have a Pre and Post Phase.

  1. For demonstration purposes, we will leave Run for all events selected
  2. Click Next (not pictured)

 

 

Select a Workflow

 

Now we need to choose a vRealize Orchestrator workflow to execute for this Event Subscription.  

  1. Open the Orchestrator tree until you have HOL-1821 folder open
  2. Select the Orchestrator > HOL-1821 > EB Get Custom Properties Example workflow
  3. On the right side, you can review the details of the workflow, including the Input and Output parameters
  4. Click Next

 

 

Save Subscription

 

  1. Leave the default Name for your new subscription
  2. Enter Sample EB Subscription in the description box
  3. Here you can see the Blocking checkbox, which we will leave unchecked for this example; the type of Event topic will determine if this checkbox is available or not 
  4. Click the Finish button to save (not pictured)

 

 

Publish Subscription

 

  1. The new Subscription will be in a Draft state by default and must be Published to become active.
  2. Select the row for the new Subscription (but don't click on the Name or you will re-open it in edit mode)
  3. Click the Publish button

 

 

Launch vRealize Workflow Designer

 

We need to have the vRealize Orchestrator Client open before we actually do our testing, otherwise we may miss watching it.

  1. Double-click on the vRO Workflow Designer icon on the Windows Desktop.

 

 

Log in to vRealize Orchestrator

 

  1. Ensure the user name is set to administrator@vsphere.local and enter VMware1! for the password
  2. Click Login (This could take 30 seconds)

 

 

Navigate to the Workflow List

 

  1. Choose the Workflow tab
  2. Expand the folders until you can see the workflows under administrator@vra-01a.corp.local > HOL-1821 folder

We will come back to vRealize Orchestrator to check on the workflow execution as we do our testing.

 

 

Open New Incognito Window

 

To reduce the login / logout cycles as we test our new Event Subscriptions, we will open a New incognito window in Chrome to allow us to log in as a second user.

  1. Right-click on Chrome in the Task bar
  2. Select New incognito window to open new window

 

 

Launch vRealize Automation

 

  1. Choose the vRealize Automation shortcut to launch
  2. Ensure corp.local domain is selected
  3. Click Next

 

 

Log in as DevUser

 

  1. Enter devuser for the username
  2. Enter VMware1! for the password
  3. Click Sign In

 

 

Request item from Catalog

 

To test out our Event Subscription, we will request a simple, single Virtual Machine.

  1. Click on the Catalog tab
  2. Locate the CentOS Catalog Item and click Request

 

 

Submit Request

 

  1. Enter a Request Description
  2. Click Submit
  3. Click the OK button on the submission confirmation dialog (not pictured)

Leave this browser instance open as we will be returning in future steps to do more testing!

 

 

Switch to the Orchestrator Client

 

  1. Switch to the Orchestrator Client in the task bar

 

 

Review Workflow History

 

It's time to review what is happening in vRealize Orchestrator as our VM Request processes.  Return to the vRealize Orchestrator client which you logged into a few steps back by choosing it from the Task bar. You should already be in the workflow list.

  1. Expand the EB Get Custom Properties Example. Note that it may take some time for the list of executions to show up here.
  2. You should see a long list of executions for this workflow - this is because you selected "Run for all Conditions" when we set up the Subscription. You can see what happens when you forget to set up conditions. Click on the first one in the list.
  3. In the lower-right pane, click on the Logs tab to see the output from the workflow. All this workflow does is write all of the parameters for the event instance to the log for the workflow execution - nothing fancy yet, but can be very helpful as you start learning about the Event Broker!
  4. You can drag the divider up so you can see the complete log output
  5. When you review the log output in detail, there is some info that we want to pay particular attention to as we may want to use them later:

It's worth taking a couple of minutes to click through the different workflow executions and note the different States and Phases! Understanding the different States and Phases and the sequence in which they fire will help you immensely!

 

 

States & Phases for Machine Provisioning Event Topic

 

This is a compiled complete list of all of the State and Phase values for the Machine Provisioning Event Topic, in sequential order (the same order as what you would see when reviewing each of the workflow instance logs in previous step).  You can click on the image to enlarge it in your manual view.

 

 

Adding Properties to the Event Payload

 

Custom Properties and Property Groups are used in a variety of ways and for many types of integrations within vRealize Automation Blueprints.  These are often absolutely necessary for extensibility.  With the Event Payload, we can pick and choose specific Properties to pass, or we can send some or all, on a Blueprint by Blueprint basis.  

  1. Make sure you choose the first browser you had open, where you are logged in as CloudAdmin
  2. Choose the Design tab
  3. Edit the CentOS Blueprint by clicking on the name to open it in the Design Canvas. Note that your list of Blueprints may be different if you have completed other lab modules already

 

 

Open the Custom Properties tab for the Machine

 

We need to add a new custom property to the CentOS virtual machine:

  1. Choose the CentOS VM on the canvas
  2. Select the Properties tab
  3. Select the Custom Properties tab
  4. Click the +New button to add a new property

 

 

New Custom Property

 

We want to focus on the event that is triggered immediately after the VM build is complete.  

  1. Enter the property Name as:  Extensibility.Lifecycle.Properties.VMPSMasterWorkflow32.Requested

Remember that you can copy this long string from above and paste it into the property name using the Send Text button above the desktop.

What you provide as a Value to this property will affect which actual properties are passed to the Events.  You could, for example, use "*hostname", which would include all properties that contain "hostname", or you could use "__*" to include all hidden vRA properties.  For this test, we will want to pass everything.

  1. Enter property Value as: *
  2. Click OK
  3. Click Save and then Finish at bottom of the canvas to save and close the blueprint (not pictured)

 

 

Add Conditions to the Event Subscription

 

To save time, for our next test, we are going to narrow down the vRealize Orchestrator workflow calls only to a specific Event, State and Phase by editing the Subscription we created initially.

  1. Click on the Administration tab
  2. If necessary, Choose Events option on the left hand navigation menu (not pictured)
  3. Select Subscriptions from the menu
  4. Click on the Name of the Subscription: EB Get Custom Properties

 

 

Edit Subscription Conditions

 

We are going to enter a few Conditions to really limit this Event Subscription down to a single Event State and Phase. The Condition builder allows us to choose "All, Any or None" complex criteria.  For this example we will:

  1. Choose the Conditions tab for the subscription
  2. Select the Run based on conditions radio button
  3. Click on the Clause... dropdown
  4. Select the All of the following radio button to start a new set of conditions

 

 

Choose Lifecycle State Condition

 

We want to trigger this event subscription now only for a specific State.

  1. Click the Clause... dropdown
  2. Expand the Data option
  3. Expand the Lifecycle state option
  4. Select Lifecycle state name

If you take a moment to scroll though this list, you can see that there are many attributes you can use for configuring these conditions!

 

 

Set the Lifecycle State Name

 

To finish setting up the Lifecycle State criteria, we need to select a value:

  1. Choose the condition of Equals
  2. Click the value dropdown to show the list
  3. Click the dropdown to choose a Constant value
  4. Note the very long list of possible Event States there are now to choose from!  This list includes states for all types of Event Topics.
  5. Scroll down (quite a ways) until to locate the VMPSMasterWorkflow32.Requested state and select it
  6. Choose the +Add expression link to add additional criteria to our condition

Did you notice just how many options there are as you were scrolling through the long list of Lifecycle States?  Many more than the original six (6) we had in past versions using the workflow stubs!

 

 

Add Remaining Criteria

 

Remember in our "trace" of the Events that were fired earlier that there were multiple Phases for each State? In order to have only a single step in our VM request lifecycle trigger a vRealize Orchestrator workflow, we must further narrow down our condition by adding more criteria. If we left it as-is, we would still have our workflow called three (3) times.  Finish adding these criteria, just as you did for the Lifecycle State name, so the workflow only gets called for the POST Phase when Virtual Machines are requested.

  1. Under the Cause... dropdown, select State Phase (found under Data > Lifecycle State) (Note: You may need to scroll right on the selection box to scroll down to Lifecycle State)
  2. Select Equals for the operator
  3. Choose a Constant value of POST
  4. Add another expression (not pictured)
  5. Select Machine type (under Data > Machine) Note: you may to scroll to the right on the bottom scroll bar to navigate down on the right.
  6. Select Equals
  7. Choose a  Constant value of Virtual Machine

Your final set of conditions should look like the screenshot above.  When you are done, click the Finish button in the lower right corner of the screen to save and close the Workflow Subscription page.

 

 

Test One More Time

 

Now, let's test out our updates to the Subscription and the Properties we have made!  Click on the second Chrome instance you should still have open from the Task bar.  If it was closed, you can open a new private window again.

  1. Ensure you are logged in as devuser (remember, the password is VMware1! in case you find yourself logged out)
  2. Select the Catalog tab
  3. Request the CentOS item again
  4. Enter a Request Description and Submit the request (not pictured)
  5. Click the OK button on the Request submission confirmation dialog (not pictured)

 

 

Check Results in vRealize Orchestrator

 

Return to vRealize Orchestrator so we can review the outcome of our second test.  You should only see one workflow execution this time, instead of a long list, but you will need to check the timestamps for the latest run to find the right one. (It may take a minute for the new instance to appear)

  1. Click on the last workflow execution
  2. In the Logs, notice that State and Phase match our Subscription criteria
  3. All of Properties for this Request are now listed (scroll down to see them all) - they were all passed to our workflow and are available to use as part of our custom logic in the workflow!

Now that we've covered the basics, we will move on to our real use cases!

 

 

Clean Up Provisioned Workloads

 

As a final step in this module, please return to vRealize Automation in your second browser window, where you are logged in as devuser. This will free up additional lab resources so you can continue on to other modules. If you don't plan to continue to another module, you can skip this step and simply End your lab.

  1. Click on the Items tab
  2. Select a row with the first deployment (don't click directly on the Name, or you'll be taken into the view details page)
  3. Click the Actions dropdown at the top of the grid
  4. Choose Destroy and Submit to confirm
  5. Repeat the steps above for ALL deployments.
  6. Close this browser window

The deployments will disappear from the list after the Destroy Request completes. You can use the Refresh button at the bottom of the list to see them disappear.

 

Find and Import Blueprints from the VMware Solution Exchange


Another way to extend the functionality of vRealize Automation is to import Blueprints from the VMware Solution Exchange.  Solution Exchange is the place to go to find Blueprints and plugins developed by partners and other community members.

Let's get going and import a new XaaS Blueprint from the Solution Exchange


 

VMware Solution Exchange

 

The Solution Exchange provides a search funtion to help you find what you are looking for.  In this case we searched for and found the vRealize Automation Services Pattern Blueprint.

For this lab, the Blueprint has already been downloaded to the c:\HOL\HOL-1821-03-CMP folder.

Go to https://marketplace.vmware.com/vsx/ to explore all of the content that is available via the Solution Exchange.

 

 

Launch the CloudClient

 

  1. Double-click the CloudClient from the desktop

 

 

Log in to vRealize Automation Using the CloudClient

 

  1. Type the following command to login to the vRealize Automation instance
vra login userpass --user cloudadmin@corp.local --password VMware1! --server vra-01a.corp.local --tenant vsphere.local

 

 

Import the New Blueprint

 

  1. Type the following command to import the new DBaaS Blueprint
vra content import --path C:\\hol\\HOL-1821-03-CMP\\Three-TierServicesPattern.zip --resolution OVERWRITE
  1. Type Exit to close the CloudClient (Not Shown)

 

 

Open Google Chrome

 

Now that the Blueprint has been imported, let's check out what has been created in vRealize Automation as a result.

  1. Double-click on the Google Chrome icon on the desktop

 

 

Log in to vRealize Automation

 

  1. Enter cloudadmin as the username
  2. Enter VMware1! for the password
  3. Click Sign in

 

 

Open the Newly Imported Blueprint

 

  1. Select the Design tab
  2. Click on the Three-Tier Services Pattern Blueprint to open the blueprint

 

 

Examine the Blueprint

 

  1. Click the icon until the entire Blueprint is visible on the Design Canvas

Note that all of the components needed to build this application have been imported, including software components and their dependencies.  After importing the blueprint, the base vSphere machines would need to be modified to select the proper template for your environment.  Since you haven't done that customization yet, this blueprint isn't quite ready to deploy. To learn more about blueprint creation and configuration, consider checking out HOL-1821-SDC-02!

  1. After you are done examining the blueprint, click Cancel to close the Blueprint

 

 

VMware Code

 

Another resource for downloading Blueprints is VMWARE {code}.  The code site allows community members to post and share vRealize Automation Blueprints as well as workflows and other content for VMware solutions.

Visit https://code.vmware.com to learn more.

 

Conclusion


In this module you learned about the various options for extensibility in vRealize Automation.  You also learned how to create a basic subscription with the Event Broker.


 

You've finished Module 1

 

If you are looking for additional information on deploying vRealize Automation, try one of these:

Proceed to any module below which interests you most, or move to the next step to end your lab.

 

 

How to End Lab

 

To end your lab click on the END button.  

 

Module 2 - Infoblox IPAM Integration with vRealize Automation (45 minutes)

Introduction


Learn how to use the new vRealize Automation Infoblox IPAM integration, including the new ability to leverage NSX on-demand routed networks, load balancers, and NAT networks.

This HOL-1821-03-CMP lab is broken up into 5 individual modules with varying lengths. Use the "Modules" list to determine which use case(s) you want to complete. You may choose to complete any or all modules, keeping in mind you have 90 minutes available per session.

If you have not already reviewed it, the Lab Introduction contains details about Rainpole Systems (our example company,) as well as important information on text entry, multiple language support and on-screen keyboard configuration. If desired, you can click here to review this information again.

You will need about 45 minutes to complete this module.


Reviewing the Infoblox Configuration


Before getting into the nuts and bolts of the new integration enhancements, let's take a quick walkthrough in the base configuration of the Infoblox NIOS environment to see which constructs will be consumed.

We will use two types of Infoblox networks to showcase the integration.

A network container is a parent network that contains other network containers and leaf networks. A leaf network is a network that does not contain other networks. Infoblox Grid Manager uses network containers to group IPv4 and IPv6 networks.  After you select an IPv4 network container from the IPAM tab, Grid Manager displays it in the Net Map (network map) panel, by default. Net Map provides a high-level view of your IPv4 network address space.


 

Open the Chrome Browser

 

Double-click on Google Chrome browser icon from the desktop.

 

 

Open the Infoblox Grid Manager

 

  1. Open the HOL Admin bookmark folder
  2. Select Infoblox Grid Manager from the bookmark list

 

 

Log in to the Infoblox Grid Manager

 

  1. Enter admin for the Username
  2. Enter VMware1! for the Password
  3. Click Login

 

 

View the Infoblox Networks

 

  1. Click the Data Management tab
  2. Click the IPAM sub-tab
  3. The 172.16.100.0/24 network is an Infoblox IPv4 network.  In this environment, this network is mapped to the NSX transit network.
  4. The 172.16.161.0/24 network is a network container.  This will be used to hold our leaf networks that are created when using an NSX on-demand routed network in vRealize Automation.
  5. The 192.168.110.0/24 network is an Infoblox IPv4 network.  In this environment, this network is mapped to the default external VM network.

 

Reservation Preparation


In order to utilize the networks managed by Infoblox, the reservation will need to be modified.  The reservation needs to be modified by mapping the NSX network to the Infoblox Network Profile.


 

Log In to vRealize Automation

 

  1. Open a new tab in the browser
  2. Open the vRealize Automation bookmark
  3. Enter cloudadmin as the username
  4. Enter VMware1! for the password
  5. Click Sign In

 

 

Navigate to Reservations

 

  1. Select the Infrastructure tab
  2. Select Reservations from the menu on the left

 

 

Edit the Development Reservation

 

  1. Select Reservations from the menu on the left
  2. Click on Development Reservation to open the reservation to edit the network mapping

 

 

Edit Network

 

  1. Select the Network tab
  2. Select the check box next to the Transit Network
  3. Select Infoblox External Network Profile for the Transit Network

This will associate the 172.16.100.0/24 network viewed earlier with the Distributed Virtual Switch created by the NSX Transit Network

  1. Select RegionA0-Global-TZ from the Transport Zone drop-down
  2. Scroll down to view additional options
  3. Select the Checkbox next to NSX-DLR to enable the DLR for this reservation
  4. Select Infoblox External Network Profile for the NSX-DLR

This will allow Infoblox to assign IP Addresses to any new interfaces on the NSX-DLR created by an on-demand routed NSX network.

  1. Click OK

 

Configuring a Blueprint to use Infoblox


To use a Blueprint with Infoblox some properties need to be added.


 

Open the Blueprint

 

  1. Select the Design tab
  2. Click on the Infoblox CentOS Blueprint to open it for editing

 

 

Explore the Blueprint

 

Note that this Blueprint has been configured to use the InfobloxExternalNetwork and has a software component named Infoblox_httpd_1 being deployed to the CentOS machine.

When deployed, the Blueprint will allocate an IP address from the 172.16.100.0/24 network in Infoblox, deploy the CentOS machine, and configure the Infoblox_httpd_1 software component.  The software component installs httpd and adds the VM's host name and IP address for testing.

  1. Select the CentOS component to open the details pane

 

 

Navigate to Merged Properties

 

  1. Select the Properties tab
  2. Note the the Infoblox-Default Property Group has already been assigned to this Blueprint
  3. Click View Merged Properties

 

 

View Merged Properties

 

  1. Note the properties that will be assigned to this Blueprint.  This property group was created when the Infoblox Setup Workflow was run from the Infoblox vRealize Orchestrator Plug-in.  Please see the Infoblox documentation for more information about the settings contained here.
  2. Click Close to continue

 

Configuring Infoblox Integration with an NSX On-Demand Load Balancer


As configured, the Infoblox CentOS Blueprint will deploy a CentOS machine with an Infoblox assigned IP address.  One of the advantages of vRealize Automation's integration with NSX is the ability to dynamically create network topologies that support complex applications.  Let's configure a load-balanced blueprint with Infoblox assigned IP addresses.


 

Add a Load Balancer

 

  1. Click on a blank space to minimize the detail pane
  2. Select Network & Security from the Categories menu
  3. Drag the On-Demand Load Balancer to the Design Canvas

 

 

Configure the Load Balancer

 

  1. Select CentOS from the Member drop-down
  2. Select InfobloxExternalNetworkProfile (NIC 0) from the Member network drop-down to map the load balancer to the NIC on the CentOS machine
  3. Select InfobloxExternalNetworkProfile from the VIP network drop-down to ensure the VIP is assigned by Infoblox and placed on the correct network
  4. Click New

 

 

Configure the Virtual Server

 

The load balancer needs to be configured with the protocol and other information to properly load-balance the application.

  1. Note the default setting will load-balance the CentOS machines over port 80
  2. Click OK to save this virtual server

 

 

Set the Virtual Machine Properties

 

A load balancer doesn't do any good when there is only one machine deployed.  The CentOS machine properties need to be modified to allow for more than one instance.

  1. Click on the CentOS machine on the Design Canvas to bring up the details pane
  2. Click on the General tab
  3. Increase the Maximum Instances to 3
  4. Click Finish to save the blueprint

 

 

Open a New Browser Window

 

With the Blueprint configured, it is time to deploy a load-balanced application with IP address managed by Infoblox.

  1. Right-click on the Chrome Browser in the task bar
  2. Select New incognito window to open a new browser window and log in with a different user

 

 

Navigate to vRealize Automation

 

  1. Open the vRealize Automation bookmark
  2. Ensure corp.local is selected as the domain
  3. Click Next

 

 

Log In

 

  1. Enter devuser as the username
  2. Enter VMware1! as the password
  3. Click Sign In

 

 

Request the Blueprint

 

  1. Select the Catalog tab
  2. Click Request on the Infoblox CentOS Blueprint

 

 

Increase the Instance Count

 

To make the load-balancer useful, more than one instance of the machine will be deployed.

  1. Click on CentOS to modify the details of the machine
  2. Increase the Instances to 2
  3. Click Submit
  4. Click OK on the request confirmation screen (not shown)

 

 

Open the Request

 

  1. Select the Requests tab
  2. Click the request number to open the request status

 

 

Monitor the Request

 

  1. Click Execution Information to view the details of the request
  2. Refresh the status until the first two lines show successful

 

 

Switch Browser Windows

 

While the request proceeds, we can look at the changes that been made in Infoblox as a result of the request.

  1. Select the first instance of the Chrome Browser

 

 

Navigate to Infoblox Cloud VMs

 

  1. Select the Infoblox Grid Manager browser tab
  2. If present, this warning can be ignored
  3. Select the Cloud tab
  4. Select the VMs sub-tab
  5. Note the IP addresses that were allocated to this deployment.
    1. One IP address for the VIP on the NSX edge
    2. One IP address for each of the VM's

 

 

Switch Browser Windows

 

  1. Select the second browser window to return to the submitted request

 

 

Refresh the Request Status

 

  1. Refresh the status periodically until all of the status rows show Successful (Note: this could take a few minutes)
  2. Click OK

 

 

View the New Items

 

  1. Select the Items tab
  2. Expand the deployment
  3. Note the VIP IP address that was assigned by Infoblox.  We will use this IP to test the new load-balancer.

This deployment created an NSX Edge with a VIP for load-balancing and two new VM's.

 

 

Test the Application

 

  1. Open a new browser tab
  2. Type the IP address of the VIP from the previous step in the address bar
  3. Note the IP address on the web page

 

 

Refresh the Browser

 

  1. Refresh the browser a few times
  2. Note that the IP address and host name change as the load balancer round-robins the requests

Congratulations, you have just deployed an on-demand NSX load-balancer with Infoblox IP address management

  1. Close the browser tab

 

 

Destroy the Deployment

 

To save resources, destroy the deployment.

  1. Select the space next to the name of the deployment.
  2. Click Destroy

 

 

Submit the Request

 

  1. Click Submit
  2. Click OK on the confirmation screen (not shown)

 

Infoblox Integration with an NSX On-Demand Routed Network


In the previous steps we deployed a blueprint that created an on-demand load balancer.  Next, we will use NSX to create an on-demand routed network with IP addresses provided by an Infoblox Network Container


 

Switch Browser Windows

 

  1. Switch to the first browser window

 

 

Open the Blueprint

 

  1. Select the vRealize Automation browser tab
  2. Click on the Infoblox CentOS blueprint to open it for editing

 

 

Select the Load Balancer

 

  1. Select the On-Demand_Load_Balancer from the design canvas

 

 

Minimize the Details Pane

 

  1. Select the down arrow to minimize the details pane

 

 

Delete the Load Balancer

 

  1. Click the red X to remove the load balancer
  2. Click Yes on the confirmation screen (not shown)

 

 

Select the External Network

 

  1. Select the InfobloxExternalNetwork from the design canvas

 

 

Minimize the Details Pane

 

  1. Select the down arrow to minimize the details pane

 

 

Delete the Network

 

  1. Click the red X to remove the InfobloxExternalNetwork
  2. Click Yes on the confirmation screen (not shown)

 

 

Decrease the Maximum Instances

 

For a routed network deployment, we only need one VM in the routed network.  Decrease the maximum number of instances.

  1. Select the CentOS machine from the Design Canvas
  2. Decrease the Maximum Instances to 1
  3. Click on an empty space on the design canvas to minimize the details pane

 

 

Add the On-Demand Routed Network

 

  1. Select Network & Security from the Categories menu
  2. Drag the On-Demand Routed Network to the Design Canvas

 

 

Select the Parent Network Profile

 

The Parent Network Profile determines which network the machine will be placed on.  The profile also determines which IPAM solution provides the IP addresses.

  1. Click the ... to open the Network Profile Selection dialogue box

 

 

Select the Network Profile

 

  1. Select the Infoblox Routed Network Profile
  2. Note that the IPAM Endpoint of this profile is Infoblox NIOS
  3. Click OK

 

 

Review the Selected Network

 

  1. This Network profile is designed for NSX On-demand Routed Networks served by Infoblox IPAM.  This network profile will create up to 32 networks
  2. Click on the CentOS machine to add it to the network

 

 

Add the Network Adapter

 

The machine needs to have a new network adapter that is assigned to the InfobloxRoutedNetworkProfile

  1. Select the Network tab
  2. Click the +New button
  3. Select the InfobloxRoutedNetworkProfile from the drop-down
  4. Click OK to save the network configuration
  5. Click Finish to save the changes to the Blueprint

 

 

Switch Browser Windows

 

Now that the blueprint has been modified to deploy to a on-demand routed network, we will deploy the blueprint to test.

  1. Select the second browser window from the task bar

 

 

Request the Blueprint

 

  1. Select the Catalog tab
  2. Click Request on the Infoblox CentOS blueprint to start the request

 

 

Submit the Request

 

  1. Click Submit
  2. Click OK on the request confirmation screen (not shown)

 

 

View the Request

 

  1. Select the Requests tab
  2. Click the request number to open the request. Note that your request numbers may be different if you have completed other labs prior to this one.

 

 

Monitor the Request

 

  1. Click Execution Information to view the details fo the request
  2. Refresh the status until the first 3 lines show Successful

Now that the allocations are complete, we will switch over to the Infoblox Grid Manager to view IP allocations

 

 

Switch Browser Windows

 

  1. Select the first browser window

 

 

Navigate to the IPAM Networks View

 

  1. Switch to the Infoblox Grid Manager browser tab
  2. Select the Data Management tab
  3. Open the 172.16.161.0/24 network container

 

 

View the Leaf Network

 

  1. Hover over the block to view the leaf network's details

This Leaf Network was created by our deployment of the NSX on-demand routed network.  This network has 8 IP addresses total as configured by the network profile's 255.255.255.248 subnet mask.  The next deployment would create another network adjacent to this one.  When creating on-demand routed networks, it is important to adjust your networks to ensure you have enough room in the network for each machine while maintaining enough networks to support your number of deployments.

 

 

Switch Browser Windows

 

  1. Select the second browser window from the task bar

 

 

Monitor the Request

 

  1. Refresh the status of the request until all of the items are deployed successfully (Note: this may take several minutes to complete)
  2. Click OK

 

 

Review the Deployment

 

  1. Select the Items tab
  2. Expand the deployment to see the details of the components
  3. Make note of the IP Address assigned to the machine

 

 

Test the Deployment

 

  1. Open a new browser tab
  2. Enter the IP address from the previous step in to the address bar
  3. Note that the IP addresses match in this case because the machine was deployed to a routed network and not a NAT or Load-balanced network
  4. Close the browser tab

The first address in the leaf network is assigned to the new DLR interface by Infoblox.  In this case, 172.16.161.1 is the new gateway for these virtual machines.

 

 

Destroy the Deployment

 

  1. Select the space next to the name of the deployment (clicking the name of the deployment will open a different screen)
  2. Select Actions
  3. Click Destroy

 

 

Submit the Request

 

  1. Click Submit
  2. Click OK on the request confirmation page (not shown)

 

Infoblox Integration with an NSX On-Demand NAT Network


Previously we created a blueprint that will deploy a machine with a routed network.  vRealize Automation now allows for the creation of on-demand NAT networks with IP addresses managed by Infoblox.


 

Switch Browser Windows

 

  1. Select the first browser window from the task bar

 

 

Edit the Blueprint

 

  1. Select the vRealize Automation browser tab
  2. Click on the Infoblox CentOS blueprint to open it for editing

The blueprint will need to be modified to remove the routed network and attach a new on-demand NAT network.

 

 

Select the Routed Network

 

  1. Select the InfobloxRoutedNetwork

 

 

Minimize the Details Pane

 

  1. Select the down arrow to minimize the details pane

 

 

Delete the Routed Network

 

  1. Click the red X to delete the network
  2. Click Yes on the confirmation dialogue box (not shown)

 

 

Add the On-Demand NAT Network

 

  1. Select the Network & Security item from the Categories menu
  2. Drag the On-Demand NAT Network to the design canvas

 

 

Select the Parent Network Profile

 

  1. Click the ... to open the Parent Network Profile selection

 

 

Select the Parent Network Profile (cont)

 

  1. Select the Infoblox One:Many NAT Network

Note that this network will create a single routable IP address assigned by Infoblox and a /24 network created dynamically in Infoblox

  1. Click OK

 

 

Add the Network Adapter

 

  1. Select the CentOS machine on the Design Canvas
  2. Click the Network tab
  3. Click +New (shown greyed out)
  4. Select InfobloxOneManyNetwork from the Network drop-down to assign the new network adapter to the NAT Network
  5. Click OK
  6. Click on an empty spot on the design canvas to minimize the details pane

 

 

Select the NAT Network

 

  1. Select the InfobloxOneManyNetwork on the design canvas to bring up the details pane

 

 

Configure the NAT Rules

 

In a One to Many NAT network there is a single public IP address that translates traffic to multiple internal IP addresses.  Traffic is designated for a destination by ports.  In this case we will redirect all port 80 traffic to the CentOS machine.

  1. Select the NAT Rules tab
  2. Click +New (shown greyed out)
  3. Configure the following settings for the rule:
    • Name: http
    • Component: CentOS (NIC 0)
    • Source Port: 80
    • Destination Port: 80
    • Protocol: TCP
  4. Click OK
  5. Click Finish to save the changes to the blueprint

 

 

Switch Browser Windows

 

Now that the blueprint is configured to use an on-demand NAT network, we will deploy the blueprint and view the changes made in Infoblox.

  1. Select the second browser window

 

 

Request the Blueprint

 

  1. Select the Catalog tab
  2. Click Request on the Infoblox CentOS blueprint

 

 

Submit the Request

 

For this request the default selections are OK.

  1. Click Submit
  2. Click OK on the request confirmation (not shown)

 

 

Open the Request

 

  1. Select the Requests tab
  2. Click on the request to open the details. Again, note that your request numbers may be different if you have completed other labs prior to this one

 

 

View the Request Details

 

  1. Click Execution Information to view the request details
  2. Refresh the status until the first four items show successful (This may take a few minutes)

 

 

Switch Browser Windows

 

Now that the network components have been deployed, we will go in to the Infoblox Grid Manager to view the newly created network views

  1. Select the first browser window from the task bar

 

 

Switch to the Infoblox Browser Tab

 

  1. Select the Infoblox Grid Manager browser tab
  2. Click the refresh button in the browser to refresh the GUI
  3. Note that the leaf network that was created by the on-demand routed network is gone now that that deployment has been destroyed
  4. Click IPAM Home

 

 

Select the New Network View

 

Network Views in Infoblox allow for overlapping IP address spaces for situations like multi-tenancy or non-unique NAT network spaces.  In this case vRealize Automation's integration with Infoblox has created a new Network View for our newly deployed blueprint.

  1. In the upper left corner of the screen, select the vRA... Network View from the list

Note: Network View names are randomly generated so it may have a different title

  1. Note the newly created network

 

 

Switch Browser Windows

 

Now we can go back and check the status of our deployment and test the application

  1. Select the second browser window

 

 

View the Request Status

 

  1. Refresh the status until all items show Successful (this could take a few minutes to complete)

 

 

View the Deployment

 

  1. Select the Items tab
  2. Expand the deployment
  3. Note that the IP address given to the machine is a NAT'd address assigned by Infoblox
  4. Click on Edge to open the details about the NSX Edge

 

 

View the NSX Edge Details

 

The Edge hold the NAT rules for the application.  This is where we will find the public IP address for our application.

  1. Click and drag the column separator to make the Source Address column readable
  2. Make a note of the Source Address.  We will use this again
  3. Click Close

 

 

Test the Application

 

When we created the blueprint, we created a NAT rule for port 80.  Let's test the application to make sure everything is working as expected.

  1. Open a new browser tab
  2. Type the IP address from the previous step in to the address bar
  3. Note the IP address of the machine is a NAT'd address
  4. Close the browser tab

 

 

Optional: Destroy the Deployment

 

If you plan on completing another module, destroy your deployment to save resources

  1. Click on the deployment (Note: if you click on the deployment name it will open an different window)
  2. Select Actions
  3. Click Destroy
  4. Click Submit on the new request screen (Not shown)
  5. Click OK on the request confirmation screen (Not shown)

 

Conclusion


In this module you learned about prerequisites necessary to configure Infoblox integration with vRealize Automation.  You also learned how to configure and deploy a blueprint with on-demand NAT, Routed, and Load Balanced NSX networks with Infoblox IPAM managed IP networks.


 

You've finished Module 2

 

If you are looking for additional information on vRealize Automation, try one of these:

Proceed to any module below which interests you most, or move to the next step to end your lab.

 

 

How to End Lab

 

To end your lab click on the END button.  

 

Module 3 - Integrating vRealize Automation with ServiceNow (45 minutes)

Introduction


Learn how to configure and consume vRealize Automation catalog items via the ServiceNow integration.

This HOL-1821-03-CMP lab is broken up into 5 individual modules with varying lengths. Use the "Modules" list to determine which use case(s) you want to complete. You may choose to complete any or all modules, keeping in mind you have 90 minutes available per session.

If you have not already reviewed it, the Lab Introduction contains details about Rainpole Systems (our example company,) as well as important information on text entry, multiple language support and on-screen keyboard configuration. If desired, you can click here to review this information again.

You will need about 45 minutes to complete this module.


Install and Configure MID Server


In this lesson you will watch a video that outlines how to install and configure the Management, Instrumentation, and Discovery (MID) server for ServiceNow. The MID Server facilitates communication between the ServiceNow platform and external applications, such as vRealize Automation. The MID Server allows for secure communication, data collection, and probing.


 

Video: Installation and Configuration of the MID Server

 

Configure ADFS and ServiceNow SSO


Once the MID Server has been set up, you will now begin to configure Active Directory Federation Services (ADFS) for ServiceNow SSO to handle SAML Token authentication between vRealize Automation and ServiceNow. This service will enable your users to log in to ServiceNow and have their credentials passed automatically to vRealize Automation when a catalog request is made. This will avoid the users having to log in to multiple systems to request and manage their catalog items.


 

Video: Configure ADFS and ServiceNow SSO

 

Configure vRealize Automation for ADFS


This video will review the steps required to configure vRealize Automation to use ADFS for SAML Token authentication with ServiceNow. This is necessary to allow for the user session in ServiceNow to translate to vRealize Automation and grant them access to their catalog items and actions.


 

Configuring vRA to use ADFS

Note: The XML template for the Claim Rule transformation step at 5:50 in the video can be found on page 8 of the VMware Identity Manager Integration with Active Directory Federation Services document.

 

Install and Configure vRealize Automation Plugin for ServiceNow


Now that the MID Server, and ADFS has been configured for both ServiceNow and vRealize Automation, you can now move forward with installing and configuring the vRealize Automation plugin for ServiceNow.


 

Setting up the vRealize Automation Plugin for ServiceNow

The ServiceNow plugin for vRealize Automation can be found on the VMware Solution Exchange as the VMware vRealize Automation Plug-In for ITSM.

 

Conclusion


Congratulations on completing Module 3 - Integrating vRealize Automation with ServiceNow. Now that you have configured the vRealize Automation plugin for ServiceNow, your users can request, deploy, and manage catalog items in the ServiceNow portal. ServiceNow can now act as the front end for your users who wish to consume vRealize Automation catalog items and not have to log into a separate tool to do so.


 

You've finished Module 3

 

If you are looking for additional information on deploying vRealize Automation, try one of these:

Proceed to any module below which interests you most, or move to the next step to end your lab.

 

 

How to End Lab

 

To end your lab click on the END button.  

 

Module 4 - Puppet Integration with the Configuration Management Framework (45 minutes)

Introduction


Learn how to deploy a WordPress application using Puppet and vRealize Automation's Configuration Management Framework.  This HOL-1821-03-CMP lab is broken up into 5 individual modules with varying lengths. Use the "Modules" list to determine which use case(s) you want to complete. You may choose to complete any or all modules, keeping in mind you have 90 minutes available per session.

If you have not already reviewed it, the Lab Introduction contains details about Rainpole Systems (our example company,) as well as important information on text entry, multiple language support and on-screen keyboard configuration. If desired, you can click here to review this information again.

In this module you will act as the cloud admin and a developer for Rainpole to configure and deploy a WordPress application.

You will need about 45 minutes to complete this module.


Puppet Installation and Prerequisites


vRealize Automation's Configuration Management Framework can take advantage of third-party configuration management tools that you may already leverage in your environment. In this case you will be using Puppet Enterprise, which has been installed and configured in the environment.

In this module the following items have been configured:


 

Puppet Roles

In Puppet, the roles and profiles method allows an administrator to configure an endpoint with all of the software and configuration elements needed for immediate use by the developer or end-user.  There are three levels used in this method to define a system configuration.

 

 

 

WordPress Role

In this lab, WordPress will be installed with all of elements needed on a single machine.  The following is a high-level overview of the wordpress_server role that is pre-defined in Puppet Enterprise

The outline shows that the role of wordpress_server includes several modules with their default configurations.  The role also includes two profiles, firewall and wordpress.  These profiles have some configuration elements that turn off the firewall, change the install directory for WordPress, change the install source for WordPress, and define the version of WordPress to be installed.

 

 

 

Puppet Plug-in for vRealize Automation

 

The Puppet Plug-in for vRealize Automation is installed through the vRealize Orchestrator Control Center.  The plug-in installs the workflows shown in the image.  The notable workflows used in this lab are the following:

 

Creating the Configuration Management Framework Endpoint


The Configuration Management Framework Endpoint allows vRealize Automation to communicate with the Configuration Management server.  vRealize Automation will allow the administrator to define multiple Configuration Management servers to cater to different parts of the business.


 

Open Chrome Browser from Windows Quick Launch Task Bar

 

  1. Click on the Chrome Icon on the Windows Quick Launch Task Bar.

 

 

Log In to vRealize Automation

 

  1. Enter cloudadmin as the username
  2. Enter VMware1! as the password
  3. Click Sign in

 

 

Navigate to vRO Configuration

 

  1. Select the Administration tab
  2. Select vRO Configuration from the menu

 

 

Create a new Puppet Endpoint

 

Let's create a new vRealize Automation Configuration Management Framework Endpoint for Puppet

  1. Select Endpoints from the menu on the left
  2. Click +New

 

 

Select Puppet as the Plug-in Type

 

When the Puppet Plug-in is installed in vRealize Orchestrator, the Puppet plug-in type is enabled in vRealize Automation

  1. Click the drop-down arrow to expand the Plug-in list
  2. Select Puppet from the Plug-in list
  3. Click Next

 

 

Enter a Name for the Puppet Endpoint

 

  1. Enter HOL-Puppet in the Name field
  2. Click Next

 

 

Enter the Puppet Endpoint Details

 

  1. Enter HOL-Puppet as the Display Name
  2. Enter puppet-01a.corp.local for the Hostname
  3. Enter root as the SSH and RBAC Username
  4. Enter VMware1! for the password
  5. Ensure No is selected in the sudo command selection
  6. Click Finish

Note: A user named "root" was created in the Puppet Enterprise Console.  Puppet's implementation of the framework requires that a user with the same name exist in both SSH and the Puppet Console.  If you create a user with limited access to the SSH host, then you would enable the sudo command selection option to elevate commands run on the host.

 

 

Endpoint Created

 

Note the newly created endpoint along side the existing puppet endpoint.  The Configuration Managment Framework allows for more than one Configuration Management endpoint.

The next step is to create a blueprint that will utilize the Puppet Endpoint to configure the WordPress application on a CentOS template.

 

Create a Puppet Managed Blueprint


In this section, you will create a Blueprint that will take advantage of the Puppet Endpoint to configure the node after deployment.


 

Navigate to the Blueprint List

 

  1. Select the Design tab
  2. Click on the description field of the CentOS Blueprint to select the Blueprint
  3. Click Copy

 

 

Create a Copy of the Blueprint

 

  1. Enter Puppet - CentOS for the Blueprint name
  2. Enter a description for your new Blueprint
  3. Click OK

 

 

Configure the Blueprint

 

A snapshot has been created with a custom YUM repository containing all of the packages needed to deploy your version of Apache, MySQL, and WordPress.  We need to select the appropriate snapshot.

  1. Select the CentOS machine on the Design Canvas
  2. Select the Build Information tab
  3. Select the application authoring snapshot from the Clone from snapshot drop-down
  4. Click the down arrow to collapse the details pane and expose the Design Canvas again

 

 

Add Puppet to the Machine

 

Now that the correct snapshot is selected, we need to add the Puppet agent to the machine.

  1. Select Configuration Management from the Categories menu
  2. Drag Puppet to the machine

 

 

Configure Puppet

 

This Blueprint will be used for our developers to provision their environments.

  1. Type Dev_Puppet in the ID field. (Note: The ID cannot contain spaces)
  2. Select the Server tab

 

 

Configure the Puppet Server

 

  1. Select HOL-Puppet as the Puppet master
  2. Since this will only be used by developers, select dev from the Puppet environment drop-down
  3. Check the Set in request form box to allow the user to select the appropriate Puppet role for their task.

Note: Domain based auto-signing has been configured on the Puppet Enterprise server so the Shared secret field is not necessary in this case.

 

 

Configure the Managed Node

 

The Puppet endpoint wil install the Puppet Agent on the new machine.  In order to complete this task, we need to provide the appropriate credentials for the template.

  1. Select the Managed Node tab
  2. Enter root for the username
  3. Enter VMware1! for the Password
  4. Click Finish

 

 

Publish the Blueprint

 

When a Blueprint is first created, it is in a Draft state.  We need to publish the Blueprint to make it available to be added to a catalog.

  1. Select the Puppet - CentOS Blueprint by clicking on its description
  2. Click Publish

 

 

Navigate to Catalog Managment

 

Now that the Blueprint has been created, it needs to be added to a catalog for users to deploy.

  1. Select the Administration tab
  2. Click Administration on the left menu if necessary (Not Shown)
  3. Click the Catalog Management menu item

 

 

Select the Blueprint

 

  1. Select Catalog Items from the menu on the left
  2. Click Puppet - CentOS to open the catalog item for editing

 

 

Add the Blueprint to a Service

 

  1. Scroll down
  2. Select Infrastructure from the Service drop-down to add this to the Infrastructure service in the end-user catalog
  3. Click OK

 

Deploy and Test the New Blueprint


Now that the Blueprint has been configured, let's deploy a WordPress application as a developer.


 

Log Out of the Console

 

  1. Click Logout

 

 

Log Out (continued)

 

  1. Click Go back to login page

 

 

Log In

 

Log in as a developer to request the new Blueprint

  1. Enter devuser as the username
  2. Enter VMware1! as the password
  3. Click Sign in

 

 

Request the Blueprint

 

  1. Select the Catalog tab
  2. Click Request on the Puppet - CentOS Blueprint

 

 

Configure the Request

 

When we configured the Blueprint, we selected the box to allow the user to choose the Puppet role appropriate to their work.

  1. Select Dev_Puppet from the menu
  2. Click ... to bring up the Role Selection menu (Note: You may have to scroll right to see the button)

 

 

Select the Role

 

In this instance, the developer needs to develop some WordPress Plug-ins.

  1. Select role::wordpress_server from the menu
  2. Click OK

 

 

Submit the Request

 

  1. Click Submit to start the request

 

 

Confirm the Request

 

  1. Click OK to confirm the request
  2. Select the Requests tab

 

 

Open the Request

 

  1. Click the request number to open the request status

 

 

Monitor the Request

 

We wll monitor the status of the request until all components are successful.  This could take several minutes.

  1. Click Execution Information to view the status of all components
  2. Click the refresh button to refresh the status
  3. When all components show successful, click OK

 

 

View the Deployment

 

After the deployment is successful, we will go to the Items tab and view the deployment to find the IP address.  We will use this IP address to test the new WordPress deployment

  1. Select the Items tab
  2. Expand the Puppet - CentOS deployment
  3. Note the Name and IP Address of the new virtual machine.

 

 

Open a New Browser Window

 

  1. Right-click Chrome in the taskbar
  2. Select New window from the menu to launch a new browser window

 

 

Test the New Deployment

 

  1. Enter the IP address from the previous step in the address bar and hit Enter

You now have an instance of WordPress configured to your standards for your developer.  Let's take a look at how this looks in the Puppet Enterprise console.

 

 

Open the Puppet Enterprise Console

 

  1. In the same browser window, open the HOL Admin bookmark folder
  2. Select Puppet Console from the list

 

 

Log In to the Puppet Console

 

  1. Enter admin as the User name
  2. Enter VMware1! for the password
  3. Click Log in

 

 

View the Puppet Inventory

 

The Configuration Management Framework added the machine that we deployed to the inventory of the Puppet Enterprise server and assigned the appropriate role classes.

  1. Select Nodes from the menu
  2. Click the machine that you deployed earlier to view its properties.

 

 

View the Assigned Classes

 

  1. Click the Classes tab
  2. Note the role::wordpress_server that was selected during deployment has been assigned to this node.

 

 

Return to vRealize Automation

 

Please leave the Puppet Console browser open.

  1. Return to vRealize Automation by clicking on the vRealize Automation browser window in the taskbar

 

 

Destroy the Deployment

 

When a deployment containing a Configuration Management item is destroyed, the framework kicks off a workflow to remove it from the Configuration Management service.

  1. Select the area next to Puppet - CentOS to select the deployment
  2. Click the Actions menu
  3. Select Destroy
  4. Click Submit (Not shown)

 

 

Navigate to the Requests Tab

 

  1. Select the Requests tab to view the destroy request status

 

 

View the Destroy Request

 

  1. Select the Destroy Request number to open the details

 

 

Monitor the Status of the Request

 

  1. Click Execution Information to view the detailed status of the request
  2. Click on the refresh button to refresh the status until Dev_Puppet shows successful (This could take a couple of minutes)

 

 

Return to the Puppet Console

 

  1. Return to the Puppet Console by clicking on the dev-000.corp.local browser window in the taskbar

 

 

View the Updated Puppet Inventory

 

  1. Select Nodes from the menu to refresh the inventory
  2. Note that machine has been removed from inventory by the framework

 

Conclusion


In this module you learned about prerequisites necessary to configure the Configuration Management Framework with Pupet Enterprise, created and configured a Puppet Endpoint, designed a Blueprint which utilized Puppet Enterprise to deploy WordPress, and deployed and tested that Blueprint.

To learn more about the Puppet Enterprise Plug-in for vRealize Automation visit the following site:

https://docs.puppet.com/pe/latest/vro_intro.html


 

You've finished Module 4

 

If you are looking for additional information on deploying vRealize Automation, try one of these:

Proceed to any module below which interests you most, or move to the next step to end your lab.

 

 

How to End Lab

 

To end your lab click on the END button.  

 

Module 5 - Creating and Managing Custom Resources with vRealize Automation (45 minutes)

Introduction


Learn how to use vRealize Orchestrator Custom Resources to extend vRealize Automation's ability to manage existing objects throughout your business. From user accounts to coffee makers, Custom Resources are a powerful way to bring automation to all aspects of your business.  

This HOL-1821-03-CMP lab is broken up into 5 individual modules with varying lengths. Use the "Modules" list to determine which use case(s) you want to complete. You may choose to complete any or all modules, keeping in mind you have 90 minutes available per session.

If you have not already reviewed it, the Lab Introduction contains details about Rainpole Systems (our example company,) as well as important information on text entry, multiple language support and on-screen keyboard configuration. If desired, you can click here to review this information again.

In this module you will act as the cloud admin and a developer for Rainpole to configure an Active Directory User custom resource and deploy that resource.

You will need about 45 minutes to complete this module.


Create a Custom Resource From a vRealize Orchestrator Workflow


Custom Resources utilize vRealize Orchestrator's object types to create manageable items in vRealize Automation.  To get started, a Custom Resouce needs to be created.


 

Open Chrome Browser from Windows Quick Launch Task Bar

 

  1. Click on the Chrome icon in the task bar to open the browser

 

 

Sign In to vRealize Automation

 

  1. Enter cloudadmin as the username
  2. Enter VMware1! as the password
  3. Click Sign in

 

 

Navigate to the XaaS Menu

 

  1. Select the Design tab
  2. Select the XaaS menu item on the left

 

 

Create a New Custom Resource

 

Custom Resources allow us to map vRealize Orchestrator objects to a manageable object in vRealize Automation.

Create a new Custom Resource to map the AD:User object type to vRealize Automation

  1. Select Custom Resources from the menu on the left
  2. Click +New

 

 

Define the Orchestrator Type

 

  1. Type AD in the box and select AD:User from the selection box that appears
  2. Enter AD User for the Name
  3. (Optional) Add a description to the Description field
  4. Click Next

 

 

View the Schema

 

In the previous step, we selected the AD:User Orchestrator type.  This screen shows the schema information from that object.

  1. Scroll down on the Form page to view the fields that are available for the AD:User type
  2. Click Finish

 

Create an XaaS Blueprint from a Custom Resource Workflow


Now that we have created a custom resource, we need to create a XaaS Blueprint and some resource actions to manage it.


 

Create a new XaaS Blueprint

 

Now that a Custom Resource has been created, we can create a new Blueprint to consume that resource.

  1. Select the XaaS Blueprints menu item
  2. Click the +New button to create a new Blueprint

 

 

Navigate to the Active Directory Folder

 

  1. Expand the folder tree by clicking on the arrow next to the folders

 

 

Select the Workflow

 

The create a user with a password in an organizational unit is the workflow we will use to create users for our developers to test with.

  1. Scroll down until you see User
  2. Expand the User folder
  3. Select the Create a user with a password in an organizational unit workflow
  4. Scroll down on the right side to view the inputs required for this workflow
  5. Click Next

 

 

Configure the General Options

 

The name and description fields are populated from the Orchestrator workflow selected in the previous step.  The default values are OK for this run.

  1. This Blueprint will be assigned directly to a service.  Uncheck the option to Make available as a component in the design canvas.
  2. Click Next

 

 

Select the Domain Name Field

 

The developer accounts need to be created in the corp.local domain, so the domain name field will be modified to read only with corp.local as the value.

  1. Scroll down
  2. Select The domain name in Win2000 form to edit the field

 

 

 

Make the Field Read Only

 

  1. Select the Constraints tab
  2. Click the Read only: drop-down box
  3. Select Constant
  4. Select Yes from the value drop-down box

 

 

Set the Domain Value

 

  1. Click the Value drop-down box
  2. Select Constant
  3. Enter corp.local
  4. Click on the Value drop-down box (#1) again to collapse the drop-down (Not Shown)

 

 

Apply the Changes

 

  1. Click Apply to save the changes
  2. Click Next

 

 

Select the Custom Resource

 

The new XaaS Blueprint will provision to the Custom Resource that was defined in previous steps.

  1. Select newUser [AD User] to map the Blueprint to the AD User Custom Resource
  2. Click Finish

 

 

Publish the Blueprint

 

  1. Select the new Blueprint by clicking on the description
  2. Click Publish

 

Create Resource Actions to Manage the Custom Resource


Now that a Blueprint has been created, Resource Actions need to be created to manage the lifecycle of the Active Directory User.


 

Create a new Resource Action

 

The first resource action will enable a disabled user account.

  1. Select Resource Actions from the menu on the left
  2. Click +New

 

 

Select the Workflow

 

  1. Expand Orchestrator->Library->Microsoft->Active Directory->User
  2. Select Enable a User
  3. Note the Input Parameter is a type of AD:User, the same type as the Custom Resource created earlier
  4. Click Next

 

 

Map the Input Resource

 

  1. The default values have already been set.  Note the mapping between the Custom Resource and the Input Parameter for the workflow
  2. Click Next

 

 

Configure Details

 

  1. The Name is inherited from the workflow.  Change this to Enable this user

The Enable this user action should only be available if the user is disabled

  1. Select Available based on conditions for the Target criteria
  2. Select the Clause... drop-down box

 

 

 

Set the Clause Property

 

  1. Select the Is enabled parameter to determine if the account is enabled or not

 

 

Enter the Criteria

 

In this case, the action should only be available if the user is disabled.

  1. Click the criteria drop-down box and select Equals
  2. Click the value and type false in the text box
  3. Click Next

 

 

Form Options

 

The enable a user workflow only has one input which has been satisfied by the Custom Resource defined earlier.  For other workflows, a description or other fields may be necessary and could be entered here.

  1. Click Finish (Shown greyed out)
  2. Click Yes to acknowledge that there will not be a form for this action

 

 

Publish the Action

 

The new action must be published so it will be available for use.

  1. Click on the description of the new action (You may have to scroll down to find it)
  2. Click Publish
  3. Click +New to start creating the disable this user action

 

 

Select the Workflow

 

  1. Expand Orchestrator->Library->Microsoft->Active Directory->User
  2. Select Disable a User
  3. Note the Input Parameter is a type of AD:User, the same type as the Custom Resource created earlier
  4. Click Next

 

 

Map the Input Resource

 

  1. The default values have already been set.  Note the mapping between the Custom Resource and the Input Parameter for the workflow
  2. Click Next

 

 

Configure Details

 

  1. The Name is inherited from the workflow.  Change this to Disable this user

The Disable this user action should only be available if the user is disabled

  1. Select Available based on conditions for the Target criteria
  2. Select the Clause... drop-down box

 

 

 

Set the Clause Property

 

  1. Select the Is enabled parameter to determine if the account is enabled or not

 

 

Enter the Criteria

 

In this case, the action should only be available if the user is disabled.

  1. Click the criteria drop-down box and select Equals
  2. Click the value and type true in the text box
  3. Click Next

 

 

Form Options

 

The disable this user workflow only has one input which has been satisfied by the Custom Resource defined earlier.  For other workflows, a description or other fields may be necessary and could be entered here.

  1. Click Finish (Shown greyed out)
  2. Click Yes to acknowledge that there will not be a form for this action

 

 

Publish the Action

 

The new action must be published so it will be available for use.

  1. Click on the description of the new action
  2. Click Publish
  3. Click +New to start creating the destroy this user action

 

 

Select the Workflow

 

  1. Expand Orchestrator->Library->Microsoft->Active Directory->User
  2. Select Destroy a User
  3. Note the Input Parameter is a type of AD:User, the same type as the Custom Resource created earlier
  4. Click Next

 

 

Map the Input Resource

 

  1. The default values have already been set.  Note the mapping between the Custom Resource and the Input Parameter for the workflow
  2. Click Next

 

 

Configure Details

 

  1. The Name is inherited from the workflow.  Change this to Destroy this user

This workflow will delete the user, so the Disposal Type should be selected

  1. Select Disposal as the Type
  2. Click Next

 

 

 

Form Options

 

The enable a user workflow only has one input which has been satisfied by the Custom Resource defined earlier.  For other workflows, a description or other fields may be necessary and could be entered here.

  1. Click Finish (Shown greyed out)
  2. Click Yes to acknowledge that there will not be a form for this action

 

 

Publish the Action

 

The new action must be published so it will be available for use.

  1. Click on the description of the new action (You may need to scroll down to find it)
  2. Click Publish

 

Entitle the XaaS Blueprint and Actions


Now that a Blueprint and Resource Actions have been created, the Blueprint needs to be entitled.


 

Navigate to Catalog Management

 

  1. Select the Administration tab
  2. Click Catalog Management from the menu on the left

 

 

Navigate to Actions

 

Before entitling the actions, we should add some icons that identify them better in the interface.

  1. Select Actions from the menu on the left
  2. Click on Disable this user to open the properties

 

 

Change the Icon

 

  1. Click Browse... to select an icon

 

 

Select the Icon File

 

  1. Type or browse to c:\hol\HOL-1821-03-CMP\minus.png in the File name box.

Hint: You can use the drag and drop feature to copy the text to the console.

  1. Click Open
  2. Click Finish (Not Shown)

 

 

Modify the Enable This User Action

 

  1. Select the Enable this user action to edit the properties

 

 

Change the Icon

 

  1. Click Browse... to select an icon

 

 

Select the Icon File

 

  1. Type c:\hol\HOL-1821-03-CMP\plus.png in the File name box.
  2. Click Open
  3. Click Finish (Not Shown)

 

 

Create a New Service

 

To make the new Blueprint easier to find, a new service will be created.

  1. Select Services from the menu on the left
  2. Click +New to create a new service

 

 

Configure the New Service

 

  1. Enter User Management in the Name field
  2. Ensure Active is selected in the Status drop-down
  3. Click Browse... to change the icon

 

 

Select the Icon File

 

  1. Enter c:\hol\HOL-1821-03-CMP\user-group-icon.png in the box
  2. Click Open
  3. Click OK (Not Shown)

 

 

Manage the Catalog Items

 

Now that the new service is created, the XaaS Blueprint needs to be added to the Service

  1. Select the User Management row.  Do not click on the User Management title.
  2. Click Manage Catalog Items

 

 

Add the XaaS Blueprint to the Service

 

  1. Click the + button

 

 

Select the XaaS Blueprint

 

  1. Select the Create a user with a password... XaaS Blueprint that was created earlier
  2. Click OK
  3. Click Close (Not shown)

 

 

Edit the Developement Entitlement

 

With the service created, the Development Entitlement needs to be edited to include the new service.

  1. Select Entitlements from the menu on the left
  2. Click on the Development entitlement to edit

 

 

Add the User Management Service

 

  1. Select the Items & Approvals tab
  2. Click the + button

 

 

Select the Service

 

  1. Check the box next to User Management
  2. Click OK

 

 

Entitle the New Actions

 

Entitling the service in the previous steps will allow the user access to the service.  The actions need to be entitled as well to ensure the developers can manage the user accounts they create.

  1. Click on the + button

 

 

Select the New Actions

 

  1. Select the three actions you created earlier (You may have to scroll down to find all three)
  2. Click OK
  3. Click Finish (Not Shown)

 

Deploy and Manage the New Custom Resource


Now that the XaaS Blueprint and the associated actions are configured, it is time to deploy and manage a new user account.  In this section, we'll log in as a devloper and create a user account.


 

Log Out of vRealize Automation

 

  1. Click Logout in the top-right corner

 

 

Go Back to Login Page

 

  1. Click Go back to login page

 

 

Log in as Devuser

 

  1. Enter devuser as the username
  2. Enter VMware1! for the password
  3. Click Sign in

 

 

Request the XaaS Blueprint

 

  1. Select the Catalog tab
  2. Click on the User Management service that was created earlier
  3. Click Request on the Create a user with a password... Blueprint

 

 

Configure the Request

 

This request will create a new user in the Developers OU.  Remember that corp.local was set as a read-only field.

  1. Type Dev in the ouContainer field
  2. Select Developers from the resulting drop-down (Note: this value may change as when you edit the password.  Leave the field as is)
  3. Enter TestUser1 for the account name
  4. Enter VMware1! in both password fields
  5. Enter Test User as the display name
  6. Click Submit

 

 

Monitor the request

 

  1. Select the Requests tab
  2. Refresh the status until the request shows Successful

 

 

Manage the New User

 

  1. Select the Items tab
  2. Click on the description of the user account
  3. Click on the Actions drop-down

In previous steps, three actions were created, Enable, Disable, and Destroy.  In the menu shown there are only two.  This is due to the conditional visibility on the Enable and Disable actions.

  1. Select Disable this user from the menu
  2. Click Submit (Not shown)

 

 

Monitor the Request

 

  1. Select the Requests tab
  2. Refresh the status until the request shows Successful

 

 

Manage the New User

 

  1. Select the Items tab
  2. Click on the description of the user account
  3. Click on the Actions drop-down
  4. Note that Enable this user is now available due to the conditional availability

 

Conclusion


Congratulations on creating your own custom resource along with day-2 actions to go along with it.


 

You've finished Module 5

 

If you are looking for additional information on deploying vRealize Automation, try one of these:

Proceed to any module below which interests you most, or move to the next step to end your lab.

 

 

How to End Lab

 

To end your lab click on the END button.  

 

Conclusion

Thank you for participating in the VMware Hands-on Labs. Be sure to visit http://hol.vmware.com/ to continue your lab experience online.

Lab SKU: HOL-1821-03-CMP

Version: 20170920-125950